Long Path Guide- Full Electronic Edition

Long Path Guide

The online version has been completely revised in December 2012. Jakob Franke

The printed version of the Long Path Guide
(Revised 5th Edition of 2005, ISBN 1-880775-31-X) is obsolete.

Front matter

Hudson Palisades

The Hudson Highlands

Orange County and the Shawangunks

Southern Catskills

Central Catskills

Northern Catskills

Capital District

35. East Berne to John Boyd Thacher State Park  Current end for the "end-to-end" certificate.

North of the Mohawk River

Shawangunk Ridge Trail

Back Matter

 

Would you like to support the work of the Long Path by donating to the Long Distance Trails Memorial Fund?

In honor of Jakob Franke and his amazing contributions to the trail, a generous donor will double your gift with a dollar-for-dollar matching challenge grant, which will support the work of protecting and stewardship of the Long Path.

 

 

 

Long Path CIP Data

Published by
New York-New Jersey Trail Conference
156 Ramapo Valley Road
Mahwah, New Jersey 07430
www.nynjtc.org

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

New York - New Jersey Trail Conference.
The Long Path guide -- 5th ed.
    p. cm.
  Rev. ed. of: Guide to the Long Path. 4th ed. 1996.
  Includes index.
  ISBN 1-880775-31-X (pbk.)
    1. Hiking -- Long Path (N.J. and N.Y.) -- Guidebooks. 2. Long Path Region (N.J. and N.Y.) -- Guidebooks. I. New York-New Jersey Trail Conference Guide to the Long Path. II. Title.

GV199.42.N52 L666 2002

917.47'38--dc21

2002069249

Copyright (c) 2002

New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, Inc.

President's Foreword

 

 

Welcome to the newest edition of the Long Path Guide. The Trail Conference's mission is to protect the outdoors and educate people in its wise use. This book plays a role in fulfilling that mission as it describes one of the two long distance hiking trails whose lengths mainly are in New York State. There are three main reasons why this trail is important to us. First, it offers opportunities for hikers to experience different types of terrain and passes through urban, suburban, rural, and wild areas. The road walks show how vulnerable our landscape is. Second, the trail shows how public and private interests can work together to preserve our open spaces. The trail passes through more private land than any other trail maintained by the Trail Conference. This would not have been possible without us learning how to interact with private landowners and other environmental groups to obtain rights-of-way for the trail. Third, by forming the Long Path North Hiking Club to construct the northern parts of the trail, it showed how we could create more trails to be maintained by the Trail Conference and create public support through trail construction.

Thank you and enjoy the Long Path and this guide. Your purchase provides support for Trail Conference activities such as its conservation and advocacy efforts.

 

— Jane Daniels (2002)

President, Board of Directors

Preface

It is now Sixteen years since the last edition of the Long Path Guide was printed. In that time much has happened, both to the trail and to technology that keeps track of it. Work on the Shawangunk Ridge Trail was completed so that it now forms a continuous path from High Point State Park in New Jersey to the Mohonk Preserve. The Long Path joins the route near Huckleberry Ridge State Forest  and follows it to Verkeerder Kill Falls near Sam's Point. Several major relocations in Orange County, Sullivan County, Ulster County and the Catskills were completed between 2005 and 2014. Together they have removed many miles of road walking.

Technology has made easily possible for the first time an accurate trace of the entire route of the Long Path. An online overview map is aivalable of the entire Long Path and Shawangunk Ridge Trail, The thickness of the line representing the Long Path route on the maps greatly exceeds the error of the GPS units in marking its actual trace.

There are many changes in this online guide since the last edition of the printed Long Path Guide. Currently we are in the process of creating all new maps designed specifically for the Long Path. The Guide includes GPS co-ordinates for the official parking areas for those that are inclined to use this technology. Ed Walsh has allowed me to add his "Backpacking the Long Path" booklet as a new part of this book so that more people can take their wandering spirit a little farther afield. Finally, all of the photographs are new.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 8, 2021

The hard-copy guide, which was published in 2002 and reprinted in 2005, has been sold out for several years and is very much out-of-date by now. There exist plans to publish a backpacking version of the guide, and work is proceeding on a complete map set, but currently we only offer the online guide. This guide is contineously updated, and exists as a web version as well as pdf files, without pictures, for easy printing.

— Jakob Franke ( Minor edit by Andy Garrison 6-8-21)

Long Path Co-chair

 


Acknowledgments

One person, no matter how large their pretensions may be, simply can't do a project of the size of producing this book. Listed below are the different specialized tasks that go into the making of this book and the people who worked on each task. Everyone here pulled hard and made this book into a reality. However, the technical aspects of the book are only one part of producing a hiking trail guidebook. There are also the many people who provided moral support and companionship as I walked many sections of the Long Path myself to see how things really were on the trail. Of these dozens of people, I'd like to single out a few for special thanks: Ed Walsh, who seemed to walk everywhere with his GPS to check out just where things really went now that they had finished moving the trail again; Mike Warren for setting the standard that all of the other photographers, including myself, had to meet; John Jurasek for putting up with my demands for "more GPS data, more GPS data;" and finally Jane Daniels for letting me convince myself that I could do this book, for letting me do the book with so many new things in it, and then helping me see the project through to its end.

 

—HC, January 9, 2002

 

Cartography and Overall Editing: Herb Chong.

GPS Data: Elie Bijou, Herb Chong, Kay Cynamon, Jakob Franke, Ed Goldstein, John Jurasek (coordinator), Eric Meyer, Terry Murphy, and Ed Walsh.

Trail Checking: Herb Chong, Kay Cynamon, Jakob Franke, John Jurasek, Pete Senterman, and Ed Walsh.

Photography: Herb Chong, Loren Dobert, Jakob Franke, Todd Schreibman, Ed Walsh, and Michael Warren.

Text Proofing: Kay Cynamon, Walt Daniels, Jakob Franke, Pete Senterman, and Ruth Rosenthal.

Indexing: Jakob Franke.

Book Design: Nora Porter. 

Overview Map and Overview

The following overview map of the Long Path is an interactive map (you may need to click the map to enable the interactive functions).  You can zoom in for details (+/- on top right) and select trail segments for more information.  You can also click here to view the map full-screen or on mobile devices, where you can also switch the background base map.

This map is for general reference purposes only and should not be used as a complete trail map for areas traversed by the Long Path. On certain section maps, some additional side trails are shown for reference, but there may be many additional trails not shown. When a printed Trail Conference map is available for a section (indicated at top of each section page), this is the best source of comprehensive trail information.

 Click the map to expose the interactive controls, or click here to view a full-screen version of this map.

The Long Path begins in New York City, at the West 175th Street subway station near the George Washington Bridge. After crossing the bridge the trail follows the Palisades Escarpment through the lands of Palisades Interstate Park. There are many spectacular views of the Hudson River, New York City and Yonkers.

After crossing into New York, the Long Path turns away from the Hudson River to follow the ridge of the Palisades Escarpment to its end in Mt. Ivy. Much of this route passes through units of the Palisades Interstate Park system in addition to county and town parks. However, some of the vital links take the trail through private property, and there is some road walking through the towns of Piermont and Nyack. The route has extensive views of the lower Hudson River valley with the most dramatic views from Hook Mountain and High Tor.

Leaving the Palisades, the Long Path enters Harriman State Park, traversing nearly the entire length of the park in a northwesterly direction. Since Harriman is only 30 miles from New York City, many hikers from the city frequent it. An abundance of trails and old woods roads crisscross the park, giving many opportunities for circular hikes where the Long Path forms part of the route.

The Harriman part of the trail has intersections with several other important hiking trails passing through the same area. One meets through-hikers on the Appalachian Trail near Island Pond Mountain as they traverse the park from its western edge to the northeastern corner, making their way from Georgia to Maine. More information on the Appalachian Trail can be obtained from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy at 799 Washington Street, Harpers Ferry, WV 25425, or http://www.appalachiantrail.org. Those who want to treat themselves to some Trail Conference history can trace parts of the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail*, the first hiking trail constructed by the Trail Conference (between 1920 and 1921), from the junction at Times Square.

At the northern end of the park, the Long Path goes over Long Mountain, the site of the Raymond H. Torrey Memorial, commemorating one of the founders of the Trail Conference and an early supporter of the Long Path. Torrey served as President of the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference from 1931 until his unexpected death in 1938. When Vincent Schaefer of the Mohawk Valley Hiking Club originated the Long Path idea in the 1930s as New York's version of Vermont's Long Trail, Torrey's weekly column in the New York Post, "The Long Brown Path," helped popularize the idea and spotlighted the hiking community.

North of Harriman, the trail goes over Schunemunk Mountain and follows the Orange County Heritage Trail, a rail-trail. Schunemunk Mountain, the core of the State Park named after it, is the dramatic long ridge of the westernmost mountain in this vicinity. A distinct conglomerate rock forms the upper parts of the mountain. Its flattened top has many spectacular views both east to the Hudson River and north to the Shawangunks and the Catskills. The Heritage Trail is mostly a paved rail-trail which winds it way through the countryside and passes through the towns and villages of Chester and Goshen on its way to Middletown, across the Wallkill River.

Beyond the Heritage Trail, the Long Path follows rural roads for about 14 miles until it reaches the Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT) in Greenville. From there the trail follows a mixture of woods roads, foot trails, and old railroad beds, and passes by the Basha Kill, one of the largest wetlands in southern New York State, on its way to the Wurtsboro Ridge, part of the southern Shawangunks.

From Wurtsboro the Long Path follows the Shawangunk Ridge north. Characterized by beautiful white cliffs and spectacular waterfalls, the northern Shawangunks, with five mountaintop lakes distributed on its flattened tops, are among the gems of the eastern United States. The trail climbs up and over many of the cliffs and passes Verkeerder Kill Falls and many fine viewpoints. Beyond the Shawangunks, the Long Path crosses the Rondout Valley entirely on rural roads.

North of the Rondout Valley, the Long Path enters Catskill Park. The Catskills were once thought to be the highest mountains in New York as they rise abruptly from the Hudson River valley. The Long Path continues through the Catskill Forest Preserve for more than ninety miles, going over eleven of the thirty-five peaks whose summits are higher than 3,500 feet. There are many views along the way, and one gets a true sense of wilderness here. The Catskill Forest Preserve permits camping throughout the park while on state land except within 150 feet of a trail or stream and in areas above 3,500 feet. The Long Path passes near several lean-tos for those who intend to backpack portions of the trail. There are road-walking sections, but these generally go through undeveloped areas. Just south of Slide Mountain, near Denning, the Long Path meets the eastern end of the Finger Lakes Trail, another long distance hiking trail that heads west, connecting with other trails that lead all the way to North Dakota. There is also a connector to head north into Canada to join the BruceTrail. For more information on the Finger Lakes Trail, contact the Finger Lakes Trail Conference at 6111 Visitor Center Road, Mount Morris, NY 14510 or Finger Lakes Trail.

North of Catskill Park, the trail follows a series of mountains that form the northernmost edge of the Catskill Mountains. While noticeably lower than the main peaks, these mountains and ridges still offer a beautiful hiking experience. About eight miles north of the Catskill Forest Preserve, the Long Path enters several State Reforestation areas, working forests where logging is permitted (as opposed to the Catskill Park, which must be kept "forever wild"). The trail follows a few miles of country roads and makes a gradual descent to the Schoharie Reservoir.

Once reaching the Schoharie Reservoir, the northern-most outpost of the New York City water system, the Long Path heads north for 30 miles through the beautiful Schoharie Valley. This area was once a major Native American travel route and became home to many early European settlements. As the trail passes through the valley and the highlands to the west, it encounters many remnants of that early period. At the northern end of the valley, the trail goes over the sentinel of Vroman's Nose, a rocky crag with magnificent views, before descending to Middleburgh.

In Middleburgh the Long Path turns east and traverses a region known as the "Endless Mountains," largely through State Reforestation areas. Farming is still viable in this region and the trail passes along the edge of many open fields. In the east, the Endless Mountains end abruptly at the Helderberg Escarpment. After the trail meets the upper edge of the escarpment, it turns north to follow the escarpment into John Boyd Thacher State Park. From there, it continues to near Altamont and further on rural roads, across the Mohawk River, to reach Adirondack State Park in Northville. Once in Adirondack Park, it is possible to reach Whiteface Mountain via existing trails.


* The original name of this trail was the Tuxedo-Jones Point Trail.

History of the Long Path

Hiking Through History

Vincent J. Schaefer of the Mohawk Valley Hiking Club originally conceived the Long Path in 1931. He proposed that New York establish its own "Long Path" similar to the Long Trail in Vermont. The Long Trail was America's first long distance hiking trail and was often described as a footpath in the wilderness. The Long Path was intended to be an alternative route from Bear Mountain for the Appalachian Trail hiker. Unlike other trails, the Long Path was to be an unmarked route connecting scenic or historic points of interest. These points of interest themselves would be described in a guidebook. Schaefer wanted hikers to "enjoy the sense of uncertainty, exploration, and achievement that reaches its highest level when the individual is dependent on the use of compass, marked map, and wood knowledge to reach an objective." The challenge for hikers was to use topographic maps and compass to connect these points in any way they could, using whatever they found along the way.

The Long Brown Path

The Long Path started receiving much public support from Raymond Torrey in 1933. W. W. Cady* took on the assignment of scouting the route from the George Washington Bridge through the Catskills. From Gilboa north, Vincent Schaefer and his brother Paul worked out a route through the Adirondacks to Whiteface Mountain. Every week, Torrey would write a description of the newly scouted section of the route in his column "The Long Brown Path" in the New York Post. However, Schaefer's concept of an unmarked route being called a path proved to be difficult for the general hiking public to grasp.

In 1935, the Palisades Park Commission began to acquire property for the construction of the Palisades Interstate Parkway, greatly increasing access to the cliffs of the Palisades Escarpment. This revived interest in the Long Path project. By 1943, Alexander Jessup had marked the trail as far as Peekamoose Mountain in the Catskills, but World War II distracted people's minds. The project languished for nearly twenty years after that.

A Ramblin' Revival

In 1960 Robert Jessen of the Ramapo Ramblers and Michael Warren of New York City urged revival of the project. By now the post-war boom and the growth of suburbia had changed the original concept of the Long Path from an unmarked path in the wilderness into a blazed and cleared trail. There was now too much civilization to pass through. Many of the back roads and woodlands that Schaefer had planned to use for the trail corridor were now in private hands, either subdivided into homes, or otherwise unusable as backcountry hiking.

During the 1980s, construction of the trail proceeded as far north as the Catskills. In the Catskill Forest Preserve the Long Path followed existing trails as much as possible. However, new trail construction was needed over Peekamoose and Table Mountains. The last part of new trail construction in the Catskills of this era was completed when the "missing link" section around Kaaterskill High Peak opened in 1987. It became possible to continuously hike the then-225 miles of the Long Path from the George Washington Bridge to East Windham at the northern end of the Catskill Park, although there were still road walking sections even in the Park.

Long Path North Hiking Club and the SRT

The 1990s became another great period of trail building. With assistance from the National Park Service's River and Trail Conservation Assistance Program, the Long Path North Hiking Club was formed. Members of this organization have built and maintained over 75 miles of the Long Path through Schoharie and Albany Counties, and currently are developing a trail through Schenectady County. Additionally the Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT) was built connecting High Point, New Jersey with Minnewaska State Park in New York. The SRT provides an alternative route for the Long Path from Harriman State Park northwards. One can hike the Appalachian Trail from Harriman west to High Point State Park in New Jersey before heading north on the SRT to rejoin the main Long Path in Greenville, NY.** The SRT is co-aligned with the Long Path for the next 30-plus miles, when the Long Path heads north toward the Catskills, and the SRT continues east along existing trails into Minnewaska State Park and the Mohonk Preserve, toward Rosendale and the end of the Shawangunk Ridge.

Long-Term Challenges

The existing trail route constantly changes to adapt to private land changes. In the late 1970s and in the 1980s, the northward movement of suburbia began to have a major impact on the Long Path's trail system. Where it was once possible to get permission to build a trail with just a knock on a door and a handshake, formal agreements were now required. The ridge tops where the trail passed were no longer immune to development. In some areas, the trail had to be moved from the woods to public roadways. In other places, bucolic country roads followed by the trail became suburban thoroughfares.

About 60 miles of the Long Path currently follow public roadways. The Trail Conference is working on several plans to reduce the amount of road walking. Particularly difficult is the Orange County section between Schunemunk Mountain State Park and the Shawangunks. Because of the lack of public lands and much suburban development, finding a suitable trail route is a challenge. Two strategies have developed to address the "Orange County problem."

Building a Solution

In Rockland County, the Long Path passes through a series of state, county, and town parks before entering Harriman State Park. While most of the trail in Rockland County is on public land, there are vital links across private property. Only 30 miles from New York City, this section is the most threatened. Together with the Rockland County Planning Board, the Trail Conference prepared a report in 1989 entitled "The Long Path in Rockland County." This report, which views the Long Path as "the spine of a Rockland County Greenway," provides guidelines to local planning boards for long-term protection strategies for the trail. The Long Path has received greater protection as it was put on the official county map.

In the summer of 2000, a major relocation was completed eliminating 3 miles of road walking and the use of the Mink Hollow Trail. Plateau Mountain was added. In the summer of 2001, the Long Path was rerouted over Indian Head Mountain and north through the Catskill Center's Platte Clove Preserve, eliminating another mile of road walking and the Jimmy Dolan Notch Trail. Camping is not permitted in the Platte Clove Preserve.

In 2014 the Long Path was moved onto a new trail that was constructed between 2012 and 2104. This trail starts at the foot of Wittenberg Mountain and runs across Cross Mountain, Mt. Pleasant and Romer Mountain, to Lane Street in Phoenicia. This relocation removed about 5 miles of road walking along Woodland Valley Road. Another relocation will happen in the area south of Vernooy Falls as the trail is moved to recently acquired land.

As of February 2016 the main section of the Long Path is a continuous 358-mile hiking trail that extends from New York City to Boyd Thacher State Park near the Village of Altamont, about 15 miles west of Albany (The alternate route of AT and SRT adds about 8 miles to the total). The trail has been extended across the Mohawk River to the Adirondacks (the description of a roadwalk to the Northville-Lake Placid Trail has been added), making the trail a total of 431 miles, but until more of this route has been placed off-road it will not be a requirement for the end-to-end certificate.

The Trail Conference & the Long Path North Hiking Club has also begun a concerted effort to extend the Long Path across the Mohawk River and into the Adirondack Park, thus enabling the Long Path to achieve its original goal of a long-distance trail from New York City to the northern Adirondacks. Work will continue to improve this section. After a two-year study conducted by the Trail Conference and the National Park Service, the trail is being built along the original route as envisioned by Vincent Schaefer in the 1930s.

Several sections of the Long Path are listed as National Recreational Trails: the section on top of the New Jersey Palisades, the section traversing Harriman State Park, and most recently the section in Mine Kill State Park in Schoharie County.


Cady was born in Kansas, lived in Colorado, and moved to the NYC area in the 1920s. Currently, nothing more is known about him.

** In 1989, the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, in cooperation with the National Park Service, initiated a study to determine the feasibility of relocating the Long Path from the roads of Orange County to the Shawangunk Ridge. The proposed route would follow the Appalachian Trail from Harriman State Park to High Point State Park in the northwest corner of New Jersey and then continue along the Kittatinny-Shawangunk Ridge to Minnewaska State Park. After two years of study, a report was issued that demonstrated the feasibility of this route. The Trail Conference quickly negotiated agreements with landowners, and 30 of the 36 miles of the trail were constructed during 1992 and 1993 under the leadership of Howie Dash and Gary Haugland. The remaining 6 miles were finished in 1997. Today, there are two Long Path routes from Harriman State Park to Minnewaska State Park: the traditional Orange County lowland route and the Shawangunk Ridge Trail with its breathtaking views. In 2012 almost half of the 35 miles of roadwalking in Orange County were eliminated by relocating the Long Path onto the Heritage Trail, an Orange County rail-trail.

 

Navigation

logos

 

The Long Path is marked with a 2" x 4" paint blaze for most of the route. The blaze color is LP aqua, a trade name of the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. It is a light blue-green that many people term turquoise. Turns are marked with two blazes, one over the other, with the top blaze offset in the direction of the turn. For important locations, the Long Path uses plastic marker disks (often abbreviated to "markers") that approximate the paint blaze color. The SRT is marked with 2"x3" blue paint blazes, and blue markers at some locations.

The only major exceptions to the blazing described above are in Catskill Park and on the Wurtsboro Ridge DEC parcels near Wurtsboro on the Shawangunk Ridge. These are areas where the Trail Conference maintains the trails on behalf of the DEC. In the both areas, the Long Path follows existing Forest Preserve trails marked in blue, red, or yellow plastic disks, depending upon the trail. In certain sections of private land inside the park, the Long Path blazes revert to aqua paint blazes. In the oldest parts of the park, some of these markers are made of painted metal. Be sure to read the descriptions carefully, as the disk colors often change in the middle of a section.

Three main sources of maps cover the areas traversed by the Long Path: ones produced by the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, ones produced by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and by Jimapco, a commercial map vendor. The Trail Conference's maps are specialized for hiking. They contain all of the officially maintained trails in their areas of coverage with markings for features of special interest to hikers. The maps are printed on Tyvek, a waterproof and tear resistant material, to enable their use in all weather conditions. However, only about half of the Long Path crosses areas covered by these maps. The USGS 7.5' 1:24,000 series of topographic map quads cover all areas crossed by the Long Path but are printed on paper and thus need protection from wet and windy weather. Also, the vast majority of these maps were produced in the 1950s or 60s and are sometimes well out of date, even when taking into account special "photo-revised" updates produced in the early 1980s. The third source is Jimapco, a company specialized in making road maps of the northern part of the Hudson Valley and surrounding areas. They produce the best road maps available for navigating to and from the trailheads for each of the sections of the Long Path. Jimapco maps are available at many small stores from Orange County northwards or on the web at http://www.jimapco.com.

The maps in this book are a combination of USGS data with some corrections to areas important for navigating the Long Path. They are designed to be a supplement to the Trail Conference's hiking maps and the USGS topographic maps. As such, they are neither as detailed nor as complete in coverage. However, they do contain enough detail so that hikers will not need to continually reference other maps in order to navigate the trail as they follow the descriptions in this guide.

Modern technology has become a useful accessory to hikers with small, hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) units now being quite inexpensive and reliable. The trail section descriptions contain GPS coordinates to aid in navigating the Long Path and allow hikers to reliably place themselves relative to the important points on the trail. This includes all of the major named features and all of the official parking areas.

Each GPS coordinate in this book is given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM), a worldwide standard for specifying a location on the Earth. UTM has become popular among GPS users because the coordinates are north and east specifications in meters. Knowing the UTM coordinates for two positions allows one to easily estimate the distance between the positions.

One caveat of using a GPS for navigation is that there are many different references for specifying a position. Nearly all United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are referenced to NAD27 while all GPS units in this country come from the factory set to NAD83/WGS84 (the later two standards are identical for practical use in North America). All of the coordinates in this book are given using the NAD83/WGS84 standards. In the area covered by the Long Path, the difference in position using a given coordinate amounts to several hundred feet when switching between NAD27 and NAD83/WGS84.

The second caveat for using a GPS for navigation is that there is an inherent error in GPS positions that depend on the satellite configuration and signal reception conditions at the time of measurement. Although under ideal conditions, a consumer GPS unit can be as accurate as ten feet, more typically twenty to fifty feet is the norm. The GPS positions in the descriptions in this book specify location information to more precision than the accuracy allows. This means that using a GPS unit to move to the position exactly as stated in the trail descriptions in this book will place one very close to the intended point, but not necessarily closer than one hundred feet, depending on conditions.

A third caveat for GPS users is that USGS topographic maps can contain systematic positional errors. Some of the older maps were completed from aerial photographs taken during World War II. These include many of the quads required to obtain coverage of the Long Path, and can have average horizontal errors of as much as 200 feet compared to a GPS or recent aerial photographs of the same area.

Thus, although a GPS unit can be very precise for navigation, it may not correspond to topographic or any other map sources based only on USGS data.

End-to-End

LP rocker 

The New York-New Jersey Trail Conference offers a certificate and an End-to-End "rocker" to anyone who hikes the entire length of the Long Path. Hikers have the option of using the traditional Orange County route or the more scenic Shawangunk Ridge route. The trip can be completed in one continuous trip or in a number of hikes over many years. As of December 2019, there are 178 Long Path End-to-Enders. The certificate is free to members of the Trail Conference, but there is a $5.00 handling charge for non-members.

Since the Long Path is continually expanding, the requirements for completing the trail are constantly changing. For more information, contact The Long Path End-to-End Committee, c/o Ed Walsh, 11 Kwiecinski Street, West Haverstraw, NY 10993. 

Click here to see the list of Long Path End-to-Enders.

Click here for the current End-to-End Tally Sheet.

Hudson Palisades

Hudson Palisades

The southernmost sections of the Long Path follow the Hudson River and the Hudson Palisades north, staying close to the river and to civilization. Although the trail does have some quiet forests and lakes, the majority of its scenic vistas look out over the Hudson River and the works of civilization. Its most impressive views encompass towns and villages along the way, but the most conspicuous ones are of the cities and villages on the east side of the Hudson River, not the least of which include the Borough of Manhattan and the City of Yonkers. On most days, it is possible to see barges and tugboats plying the river, and occasionally a small freighter passing as it connects points along the navigable portions of the Hudson River, from Albany south to the great port of New York City. These southernmost sections of the Long Path are the main ones easily accessible by public transportation, making them attractive and easily reachable weekend jaunts into nature for those who live in New York City.

 

forest-view 

Forest View, New Jersey Palisades. 2001 [Michael Warren]

 

1. New York City to the NY-NJ State Line

Feature: GWB, New Jersey Palisades
Distance: 14.10 miles
USGS Map Quads: Central Park, Yonkers, and Nyack
Trail Conference Map: Trail Maps 108 and 109 (Hudson Palisades Trails)

General Description

After crossing the George Washington Bridge, the Long Path follows the crest of the spectacular Palisades Escarpment on the western bank of the Hudson River near New York City, wandering between the cliff edge and the Palisades Interstate Parkway. The route affords stunning views of the basaltic face of the Palisades, the Hudson River and the City of New York and its suburbs. The trail passes through rich forests, with occasional streams and swamps. Old roads, rock walls and foundations along the route are remnants of past settlement along the Palisades. Several side trails lead down to the Shore Trail along the Hudson River. These allow the hiker to make a number of interesting circuits. The New York Walk Book and the New Jersey Walk Book, both published by the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, can be consulted for additional information. The trail is generally wide and nearly level (except for some steep sections near the New York-New Jersey border). Unfortunately, the trail is almost always within sound of the Palisades Interstate Parkway. In 1971 this section of the Long Path was designated a National Recreational Trail by Secretary of the Interior, Roger C. B. Morton.

Access

From New York: Take the A train to the West 175th Street station.
From New Jersey: Take any road, including the Palisades Interstate Parkway, I-95, NJ 4 and US 1-9, that leads to the George Washington Bridge (GWB). The trail starts on the New York side of the GWB.
By public transportation: Take any bus to the GWB bus terminal and walk over the bridge. The Red and Tan Lines buses 9W and 9A give access to many points along the trail from US Route 9W.

Parking

1.50 Fort Lee Historic Park, just south of the bridge (metered parking). (40.85181°, -73.96245°)
1.55 Street parking along Hudson Terrace (free on Sundays and holidays; meters on other days). (40.85430°, -73.96322°)
2.95 Allison Park (when open). (40.86978°, -73.95259°)
4.85 Rockefeller Lookout (20-minute limit). (40.89225°, -73.94119°)
8.05 Alpine Lookout (20-minute limit). (40.93013°, -73.92690°)
9.80 Alpine headquarters PIPC. (40.95337°, -73.92067°)
11.85 Parking, 0.2 mile from the Long Path, along Route 9W in Alpine near overpass leading to Women's Federation Monument. (40.97989°, -73.91352°)
12.60 State Line Lookout. (40.98888°, -73.90662°)

Parking is also available at Ross Dock and the Englewood and Alpine Boat Basins on the Hudson River (fee charged in season); side trails lead up to the Long Path.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path starts in New York City at the West 175th Street subway station in Washington Heights (Manhattan). Once at the station, exit to Fort Washington Avenue at either W 175th Street or W 177th Street, and turn north (uptown) on Fort Washington Avenue.

0.15 Turn left onto W 178th Street and pass Pinehurst Avenue and Cabrini Avenue on the left.

0.25 About 150 feet beyond Cabrini Avenue, turn left onto the walkway to the George Washington Bridge, and cross the bridge.

1.50 Turn right onto Hudson Terrace in Fort Lee and pass underneath the highway.  *Please click here for detour alert 

1.55 Turn right onto a staircase. The trail climbs two sets of steps, turns left to cross a roadway bridge, and enters the woods on a broad gravel track to the right of a chain-link fence. The Long Path follows the "Trail to River" signs, while several side paths lead left and right. There are a few views of the Hudson River.

GWB 

1.1 Manhattan and the George Washington Bridge. 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]

2.05 At the last of several signs for "Trail to River," the Carpenter's Trail (blue on top and white on the bottom) heads right, leading to the Shore Trail (white). The Long Path continues to the left on a narrower track near the cliff edge. In 300 feet, a side trail (white on top and blue on the bottom) leads left to a footbridge over the Palisades Interstate Parkway. The Long Path continues on past the former site of an old mounted cannon from the Spanish-American War. The trail then goes by several old stone walls and crosses a stream.

2.70 The trail passes a gas station (water, vending machines, food, phone) on the left and then crosses a stream after a short while.

2.95 The trail passes to the left of the iron fence surrounding Allison Park to reach the entrance to Allison Park. This park was developed by the  trustees of the Estate of William O. Allison (1849-1924), who was born and spent his life nearby.* When open, the park offers water, restrooms, phone, and overlooks. The Long Path continues along the paved access road to the park,  passes the entrance road to St. Peter's College, and enters a narrow strip of woods near the Parkway. It briefly follows the Parkway's shoulder before heading back toward the edge of the Palisades' cliffs on what becomes an abandoned asphalt drive.

3.65 The trail descends steps to Palisade Avenue, turns right, turns left at the corner and goes up another set of steps to the right. Nearby, the Dyckman Hill Trail (yellow) starts down the Palisades to the Englewood boat basin, leaving the Long Path, which turns left to follow the cliff edge. Views across the river include the Henry Hudson Bridge over the Harlem River and Manhattan's Inwood Hill Park. The medieval-looking monastery is the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Cloisters.

4.30 As the Long Path turns left, an unmarked trail straight ahead leads to the High Tom promontory with its magnificent views up the river.

4.80 The Long Path reaches Rockefeller Lookout and its tremendous views. Not long after, it crosses a small stream and briefly follows an old gravel road. There are many fine river views. Clinton Point, reached by a short walk toward the right away from the Long Path immediately after it passes an open area, is one of the best viewpoints. Just after the trail crosses another stream, reach the fence for the Greenbrook Sanctuary on the right of the trail.

6.65 The trail crosses the entrance road to the Greenbrook Sanctuary. The Sanctuary, open to interested parties by membership, preserves a splendid example of the forests and other habitats that once ranged along the top of the Palisades. The Long Path continues along the Sanctuary's fence, twice plunging below the grade of the Parkway to cross over streams that run through woodland swamps.

7.50 The Huyler's Landing Trail (red), which connects to the Shore Trail (white) at the Hudson's edge, leads right at a very sharp angle shortly after leaving the Sanctuary fence. The Long Path then returns to the edge of the Palisades.

8.00 Reach Alpine Lookout, with many fine views. The trail runs past the lookout point and enters the woods at the end of the cliff-edge railing. It then passes a series of old stone walls and foundations and travels briefly on an old road as it meanders between the Parkway and the cliff edge. It is never far from either, but there are plenty of river views.

9.40 A tunnel leaves to the left under Palisades Interstate Parkway to US Route 9W. The Closter Dock Trail (orange) joins from the left and continues jointly with the Long Path for the next 0.2 mile.

9.60 The trail uses a tunnel to pass below Alpine Approach Road. Immediately after the tunnel, the Closter Dock Trail (orange blazes) leads right and down the hill to the Alpine Boat Basin. The Long Path shifts left at this point and exits the woods. (For reverse direction, a sign reading "Path to River" shows where the Long Path leaves the paved road and enters the woods.)

 

Kearny House

1.2 Blackledge-Kearny house at Alpine Boat Basin. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

palisades

View from the Palisades. 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]

 

9.80 The trail passes the headquarters of the New Jersey section of Palisades Interstate Park. There are water, telephone, bathroom facilities, and information about the Park and Greenbrook Sanctuary in the Park Commission headquarters building. The Long Path enters the woods on a wide path at the north end of the headquarters parking lot, past the building. Once in the woods, it goes through a variety of hardwood and hemlock forests that afford river views, some quite fine.

11.55 The trail reaches the end of a dirt road - the abandoned portion of Ruckman Road. To the right is an overlook above the Hudson (with a concrete block wall). The Long Path turns left on Ruckman Road and, in another 50 feet, turns right on a gravel road into well-developed forest. A short distance beyond, another gravel road leads right to run along the cliff edge. This road, not part of the Long Path, ends in about 900 feet at the terminus of a great split off the main face of the Palisades. With its many splendid views, it makes a worthwhile excursion.

11.75 The trail turns right on a narrow gravel road.

11.85 The Long Path reaches a second gravel road. The left branch, marked with blue-and-white rectangles, leads to a footbridge over the Parkway to parking on 9W and to the Bergen Boy Scouts Council's Camp Alpine. To the right, these markers run concurrently with the Long Path.

11.90 Reach a clearing with stone monument shaped like a castle, a reminder of the preservation works of the New Jersey State Federation of Women's Clubs. They played an instrumental part in creating Palisades Interstate Park at the beginning of the 20th century. Beyond the clearing, the trail descends on rock steps.

 

Women's Federation Monument

1.3 Women's Federation Monument. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]


12.10 The blue-and-white trail, now called the Forest View Trail, leaves to the right and descends to the river to connect with the Shore Trail (white). The Long Path continues ahead to cross a stream on a bridge and begin an ascent on steps to reach the concrete access road to State Line Lookout. (This road was originally part of US Route 9W).

12.20 Cross the road, and continue on cross-country Ski Trail A, which is marked with aqua blazes.

12.50 Turn right on Ski Trail F.

12.60 The State Line Lookout snack bar, with restrooms, food, water, phone, and bookstore, is on the right. The concession is open all year. Beyond the snack bar is Point Lookout on top of Indian Head, the highest point in the New Jersey section of Palisades Interstate Park. The trail turns left just before reaching the snack bar, and reaches the old Route 9W in 150 yards.  Turn left on the road.

12.80 The Long Path bears right into the woods on Ski Trail E, just past the end of the rock wall along the roadside.

13.30 Continue straight ahead as cross-country Ski Trail E turns left. In another 300 feet, the Long Path turns right, up four steps, and continues on a narrower path. It turns right at a chain-link fence marking the New Jersey-New York state boundary (to the left, there is a stone boundary monument placed in 1882). The trail descends along the fence on stone steps, turns left, and passes through a gate in the fence to enter New York. It continues to descend on steps, often quite steeply, close to the edge of the cliffs.

13.60 The steps end and the Long Path turns left to descend more gradually to a stream crossing.

13.75 The Shore Trail (white) goes right and follows the stream for 0.75 mile to a beautiful cascade and remnants of Lawrence Garden (or Italian Garden, designed after a garden in Amalfi). The Long Path turns left to follow the stream uphill, ascending gently but steadily. Another unmarked trail leaves to the left 0.2 mile farther along the Long Path as the ascent ends.

14.10 The Long Path reaches US Route 9W at the entrance road to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, just north of the New Jersey-New York state line. To continue, turn right on the entrance road, then turn left at the guard house.


* William O. Allison was a native of the small group of small fishing villages that developed at the base of the Palisades during the 19th century. He was born in Undercliff Village in 1849 and became a successful journalist in his early twenties. He started a trade journal (the Oil, Paint, and Drug Reporter) and became very successful at acquiring more trade journals, making him a wealthy man. In his later years, he interviewed old-timers from the Undercliffs, but a large part of his historical collection burned along with his mansion in 1903. The trustees of his estate established Allison Park, and some of the land he owned is now a part of the Flat Rock Brook Nature Center in Englewood. 

2. NY-NJ State Line to Nyack

Features: Tallman Mountain State Park, Clausland Mountain Park, Tackamack
Town Park, Blauvelt State Park, and Sean Hunter Ryan Memorial Park.
Distance: 10.35 miles
USGS Map Quads: Nyack
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 109 (Hudson Palisades Trails)

General Description

After following the Palisades through New Jersey, the Long Path continues into New York along the Palisades Escarpment. This section is a mix of state, county and town parks and some suburban road walking. The trail begins along US Route 9W in the hamlet of Palisades, continues to Tallman Mountain State Park, descends to the Village of Piermont, ascends to Mt. Nebo, Clausland Mountain Park, Tackamack Town Park, Blauvelt State Park, and Sean Hunter Ryan Memorial Park, and finally descends into Central Nyack. This section is rich in history, with the trail passing close to historic places such as Sneden's Landing, the Revolutionary War hamlet of Palisades, Rockland Cemetery (General Frémont's Grave) and the abandoned rifle ranges in Blauvelt State Park.

Access

Take the Palisades Interstate Parkway to Exit 4, just south of the New York-New Jersey state line. Turn north onto Route 9W and continue to the entrance of the Lamont Campus of Columbia University. By public transportation: The Red and Tan Lines buses 9W and 9A along Route 9W give access to many points along the trail.

Parking

0.00 State Line Lookout (40.98888°, -73.90662°), about one mile south of the state line.
1.00 Route 9W at Rockland County bike trail near the south entrance to Tallman Mountain State Park. (41.01546°, -73.91340°)
2.60 Tallman Mountain State Park main parking area off Rockland Road (fee in season). (41.02911°, -73.91651°)
3.45 Street parking in Piermont. (Unlocated)
6.70 Tackamack Park on Clausland Mountain Road. (41.06229°, -73.93952°)
10.35 Street parking in Central Nyack. (Unlocated)

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path passes the entrance to Columbia University's Lamont Campus. The campus has departments for research on clima­tology, geochemistry, oceanography, and seismology. In another 300 feet, it turns left. Soon, the trail turns right and then stays close to Route 9W, passing a swamp on the right. The trail crosses a stone wall and ascends over a small knoll.

0.25 Turn right onto a woods road and continue downhill, roughly paralleling Route 9W.

0.45 The Long Path reaches the parking lot of a building, the former Tree Ring Lab of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, but now a daycare facility. Turn left toward Route 9W and then right onto the highway. Hikers should exercise extreme caution along this road. It has frequent high-speed traffic. Keep to the left of the road, well within the white line of the shoulder.

0.55 Reach an intersection with Washington Spring Road and Oak Tree Road in the hamlet of Palisades, New York. This is an area rich with history. To the right is Sneden's Landing. Today, it is a well-known enclave for artists and actors escaping from New York City. Historically, Sneden's Landing was the site of ferry service to Dobbs Ferry. About two miles west on Oak Tree Road are historic sites such as the De Wint House in the hamlet of Tappan, Washington's Revolutionary War headquarters, and the 1776 House, where the British spy Major André was kept prisoner prior to his execution. The Long Path continues north along Route 9W.

1.00 The Long Path turns right, leaving Route 9W, and enters Tallman Mountain State Park, passing a parking area on the left. It heads towards the river on a gravel road, part of the Tallman Bike Path.

1.30 With ruins of a brick-and-concrete building visible to the right, the Long Path turns left and continues along a raised berm. These elevated mounds of dirt were built in the early 20th century to retain seepage from a never-constructed oil storage facility that was to be established in the area. The Long Path crosses a marshy section on plank bridging and passes a pond on the right.

 

ts06a

2.1 Bridge on the footpath, Tallman Mountain State Park. 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]

 

1.95 The Long Path curves to the right and crosses the Tallman Bike Path. The Long Path then turns left and follows the Palisades Escarpment parallel to the river. There are views through the trees of Sparkill Marsh, filled with Phragmites communis (common name "giant reed") extending out into the river.

2.45 The Long Path skirts the South Picnic Area of the park, passing a stone comfort station on the left. It descends stone steps and a paved path to cross a wooden bridge over a stream. With the park swimming pool visible below to the right, the Long Path turns sharply left and goes up a paved path with a wooden railing.

2.70 At a traffic circle, the Long Path crosses the park road leading down to the river. On the other side of the road, it ascends railroad-tie steps and continues to climb, steeply at times, to the North Picnic Area. At the top, it turns right and follows the park road that runs close to the edge of the escarpment.

3.00 The Long Path reaches an outstanding viewpoint on the right, looking over the Hudson River. The Tappan Zee Bridge and Hook Mountain are visible to the north. Directly below are the mile-long Piermont Pier (the original terminus of the Erie Railroad) and the extensive Sparkill Marsh. The villages of Irvington and Dobbs Ferry may be seen across the river, with the gothic tower of the Lyndhurst mansion on the skyline to the northeast. Turn right, leave the road, and begin a steep, rocky descent towards Piermont. Interesting restaurants and shops are found in the village.

 

jf08a

2.2 Winter view of the Sparkill Marsh. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]


3.15 At the bottom of the descent, the Long Path turns left on a gravel road, the route of the Tallman Bike Path. In 200 feet, the bike path ends, and the Long Path turns right on Ferdon Avenue. It immediately crosses Sparkill Creek and enters the Village of Piermont. At a traffic light, the trail crosses South Piermont Avenue (left) and Paradise Avenue (right) to continue straight ahead on Piermont Avenue.

3.45 At the old railroad crossing in the center of Piermont, the trail turns left onto Tate Avenue, climbs uphill, then turns right and parallels the river. The trail veers left and climbs up an old concrete staircase, emerging onto Ash Street adjacent to the former railroad station. (The station building, which is over 100 years old, is now unused.) The abandoned Erie Railroad right-of-way that crosses the Long Path here is a rail-trail and an official side trail to the Long Path. It provides an interesting alternative path, with Hudson River views, north to Nyack. The Long Path turns left and continues west along Ash Street to Piermont Place. Turn left on Piermont Place and then right on Crescent Road. At the end of Crescent Road turn left, and follow the path past several houses on the right. Turn right on an old fire road and, in 75 yards, reach US Route 9W. Turn right on Route 9W and follow it for a few yards to Castle Road, a rural road.

3.90 Turn left on Castle Road, which bends north. This part of the road is private. Before reaching the last house, the trail heads to the right into the woods and rejoins the old fire road. Turn right and follow this road into Rockland Cemetery. It has fine views west toward the Ramapos in the distance. About 500 feet after passing the last house, the path meets a paved cemetery road. The trail makes a 180-degree turn and continues uphill on the cemetery road to reach the top of the Palisades and a seasonal view of the Hudson. At the top, the trail passes the obelisk memorializing Henry Honeychurch Gorringe, who transported Cleopatra's Needle from Egypt, as well as the monument to General John Charles Frémont, better known as the "Pathfinder." Also buried at the cemetery, almost within touching distance of the Long Path, is George Zoebelein, a long-time trail supervisor of the Long Path in Rockland County, and a former president of the Trail Conference. George's gravesite is approximately 30 feet from where the trail makes the 180-degree turn.

4.80 The Long Path leaves the cemetery and gradually regains the Palisades ridge, where it heads northwest along the ridge. It continues on a level path through the woods, crossing several stone walls and intermittent streams.

5.50 The Long Path arrives at a three-way trail intersection. An orange-marked trail, built and maintained by Rockland County, goes to the right to Mt. Nebo, once an Air Force Nike missile site and now a recreation area for the Town of Orangetown. This trail rejoins the Long Path in 0.4 mile. The Long Path continues straight ahead and heads downhill, crosses a streambed, makes a left jog, and then goes right. An old woods road goes left and leads to NY Route 303, near the Kings Highway intersection. The trail ascends gradually and then undulates through the woods of Clausland Mountain Park, a Rockland County park.

5.90 The orange-marked trail comes in from the right. The Long Path continues, crossing several streams along the way, the last time on a wooden bridge.

6.70 The trail crosses Clausland Mountain Road and enters Tackamack Town Park in the Town of Orangetown. Tackamack was the Indian name of Jan Claus, a trader who lived in the area.*The trail passes through a metal gate and descends, first on a gravel road and then on a woods road, until it reaches a small water impoundment. Here the Long Path goes right into the woods, following the water impoundment. The trail follows the stream for a while and finally crosses it on a wooden bridge.

7.20 The Long Path crosses a road (Marsico Court) and enters Blauvelt State Park. The trail passes through a stand of evergreens and veers right, after which it joins a woods road. A nearby embankment was the site of the firing line for the pre-World War I National Guard Camp Bluefield's rifle range. They were forced to close the camp because the lead from the bullets kept landing in Grand View, to the east along the river. All the trees in this section were planted after the National Guard abandoned the rifle range. The trail continues on a series of woods roads, then parallels a target wall of the rifle range.

7.75 The Long Path climbs over a small embankment and descends a set of wooden steps to a woods road. This embankment is actually the earth-covered concrete tunnel that provided safe passage from the firing line to the target wall. The entrance to the tunnel is on the right. The trail crosses the woods road, in about 100 yards turns right onto another woods road, and in one-tenth of a mile turns right again, then continues straight on yet another woods road. At the next crossing the Long Path turns left.

8.25 A white trail and a woods road join from the left, just before a stream crossing. The Long Path turns right across the stream and heads uphill into the woods before finally emerging onto Tweed Boulevard (Rockland County Route 5).

8.65 The Long Path crosses the road and climbs a staircase onto the crest of the Palisades ridge.

8.75 There is a 180-degree view here, with the Tappan Zee, Piermont Pier, New York City and the Hackensack River valley visible. This was the site of the famous "Balanced Rock." Because vandals managed to unbalance the rock, park officials were forced to remove it in 1966. From here, the trail continues along the ridge before finally descending to a gravel road. The road leads left to Tweed Boulevard and right to a water tank.

9.15 The Long Path continues by crossing the gravel road and making a sharp ascent to gain the ridge. The trail starts descending, crosses an open woods road, and continues north. It passes a grove of evergreens just before reaching Bradley Hill Road (Rockland County Route 38).

9.65 The trail turns right on Bradley Hill Road and, after a few paces, turns left into the woods just past a driveway and regains the Palisades ridge crest. You are now in Sean Hunter Ryan Memorial Park, a Rockland County park. [If heading for historic Nyack instead of staying on the Long Path, continue on Bradley Hill Road and turn right onto South Highland Avenue, at the entrance to Nyack College. Turn right onto Upland Drive; turn right onto South Boulevard, and then left onto Central Avenue, left onto Prospect Avenue, right onto Terrace Drive, and left onto Lowland Drive. Following a switchback, US Route 9W is reached. Turn left to a bridge across the New York State Thruway and cross the bridge. At a blinking red light (corner of Franklin Street and Clinton Avenue) the rail-trail from Piermont to Nyack is reached. Follow the rail-trail to the left to reach the center of Nyack. Broadway, where buses, shops, and restaurants are available, is one block to the right.]

9.90 The Long Path passes an opening in an old stone wall. There are good (seasonal) views into the Village of Nyack in this area. On the right is a bench and mounted in the rocks is a plaque commemorating Sean Hunter Ryan. The trail starts to descend west off  the ridge.

10.00 The trail passes a side trail (white blazes) on the left to Buttermilk Falls Park, a Rockland County park. The side trail connects with a county-maintained trail system and allows a loop hike of 2.4 miles. The trail continues to descend off the ridge and turns left, then right, to pass a residential area.

10.10 The trail emerges onto the end of paved Towt Road. It follows Towt Road and then continues onto Waldron Avenue.

10.35 The trail reaches the intersection of Waldron Avenue and NY Route 59 in Central Nyack. Here there are a number of motels, stores and fast food restaurants. To continue, proceed straight ahead (the road beyond this point is known as Mountainview Avenue). At the northeast corner of Route 59 and Mountainview Avenue are two monuments. The first is 'Mile to Nyack' and commemorates the opening of the Nyack Turnpike in 1830 (from Nyack to Suffern). The second monument commemorates the slaying of O'Grady, Brown and Paige, following the Brinks armored car robbery on October 20, 1981.


 

* Although a Native American of the Wicqaskeek tribe on the east side of the Hudson, Tackamack adopted the Dutch name of Jan Claus (or Jan Klase). He was a very active signer of Native American deeds, and his name can be found on the deeds establishing the Tappan patent, the Demarest patent, and the Wawayanda patent. One wonders how he had established the right to sign these patents on behalf of Native Americans.

3. Nyack to Long Clove

Features: Hook Mountain
Distance: 8.85 miles
USGS Map Quads: Nyack and Haverstraw
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Maps 110 and 111 (Hudson Palisades Trails)

General Description

The first two miles of this section are suburban and the trail frequently runs along roads or near houses. After leaving US Route 9W, the Long Path ascends Hook Mountain. Its bare summit affords splendid views up and down the Hudson River. The trail then continues through woodlands and along ridges, passing an old cemetery and old quarries.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 11, Mountainview Avenue.
By public transportation: The Red and Tan Lines buses 9W and 9A give access to many points along the trail from US Route 9W.

Parking

0.00 Strip shopping centers along NY Route 59 may provide parking. (Unlocated)
2.10 Christian Herald Road at US Route 9W. (41.11008°, -73.92744°)
5.75 Landing Road (limited, tends to fill up on weekends). (41.14358°, -73.91232°)
6.35 Golf course parking lot (fee in season).
8.85 Southeast side of US Route 9W, across from Landmark Drive, formerly known as Long Clove Road (limited parking). (41.17449°, -73.94458°)

Trail Description

0.00 The section begins where Waldron Avenue/Mountainview Avenue crosses NY Route 59. There is a traffic light at the intersection. The Long Path continues north on Mountainview Avenue and heads uphill to the bridge over the New York State Thruway. This is a busy commercial area with food and phones widely available. Once across the Thruway, Mountainview Avenue passes a driveway on the right.

0.25 The trail turns right into woodland after passing the driveway. Next, the trail crosses a road from an apartment complex and ascends the steep pitch on the other side. It quickly bears right and passes through a narrow strip of woods with housing complexes on both sides. At the next junction, continuing eastward on a woods road leads to a corner of Oak Hill Cemetery where there are spectacular views of the Tappan Zee, one of the widest parts of the Hudson. The trail turns left instead and climbs the woods road on a series of switchbacks to a water tank.

0.70 Now on the level, the trail continues northward along a stone wall. It skirts another garden apartment complex on the left through adjoining woodland. An unmarked trail drops down on the right to the Nyack High School, but continue on the level. Finally, the trail turns downhill on an old driveway and reaches Christian Herald Road.

1.70 Turn right onto Christian Herald Road.

2.10 The Long Path turns left onto US Route 9W at a traffic light.

 

07s

3.1 View from Hook Mountain [MICHAEL WARREN]


2.50 Leave US Route 9W through a gap in the guardrail. After about 20 feet, the trail turns right into the woods, and moves diagonally away from the road. Pass an intersection on the right where the Upper Nyack Trail (white) descends downhill through the woods. It ends after 0.75 miles at the entrance to Nyack Beach State Park. This permits a circular hike using the Long Path and the Shore Path at the base of Hook Mountain. Views of the Hudson River and the Tappan Zee Bridge appear, and the trail begins
the often steep and rocky climb up Hook Mountain.

3.25 The open, rocky summit of Hook Mountain affords a tremendous view up and down the Hudson River with the Palisades visible to the south on the right bank of the river. The trail now descends through dry woods.  Many fine views occur as the trail trends downward along a broad woods road on the west side of Hook Mountain's ridge. As the trail approaches the recreation areas of Rockland Lake State Park, it passes an old stone wall and several unmarked trails leave on both sides. After a final steep descent, reach Landing Road. Turning right, Landing Road will meet the Shore Path. It can be used for a circular hike over and around Hook Mountain. Turning left leads to Rockland Lake State Park and US Route 9W.

 

jf18s

3.2 Chicken mushroom (Laetiporus sulphureus) [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

5.75 The Long Path crosses Landing Road and begins to climb. It quickly passes a tiny, old cemetery, the Wells Family Cemetery, with faded headstones from the 19th century. After passing the cemetery, the trail
begins to go up and down, following the crest of the ridge. There are several beautiful views, some from precipices, of Croton Point Park on the other side of the Hudson River. The trail passes tennis courts and a stone wall to the left.

6.35 An unmarked trail leads left to the parking lot of the State Park golf course. When open, the concession provides water, phone and food. The Long Path continues along the ridge, often changing from upward to downward, with views through the trees both to the left and to the right.

8.45 The Long Path reaches the Treason Trail (white) on the right. This trail leads down to the Shore Path. The Long Path veers left, crosses under a power line beneath which there is a railroad tunnel, and descends to US Route 9W.

8.85 The trail reaches Route 9W just east of its intersection with NY Route 304. To continue, cross Route 9W and follow Landmark Drive, an abandoned town road formerly known as Long Clove Road.

4. Long Clove to Mt. Ivy

Features: High Tor
Distance: 6.85 miles
USGS Map Quads: Thiells
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 112 (Hudson Palisades Trails)

General Description

In this section, the Long Path travels along little used roads for a mile, passes dramatic quarried cliffs of the Palisades, and then enters the woods and ascends High Tor. The ascent is often steep, with several good viewpoints. The open summit affords a 360-degree view up and down the Hudson Valley. The trail then descends from High Tor, ultimately passing Little Tor while following the ridge. After crossing Central Highway, the trail enters Rockland County's South Mountain Park. The section ends by descending off the western curving edge of the Palisades just before that feature plunges below the ground.

Access

This section begins on US Route 9W about 100 yards east of its junction with NY Route 304. The trail crosses Route 9W in the center of an "S" curve on the highway.
By public transportation: The Red and Tan Lines 11A bus stops at the intersection of Ridge Road and Old Route 304 (Rockland County Route 90, and erroneously shown as South Mountain Road on some maps), which the trail crosses.

Parking

0.00 Limited parking on the southeast side of Route 9W, across from Landmark Drive, formerly known as Long Clove Road. (41.17449°,  -73.94458°)
1.15 Grassy area at the SW corner of Old Route 304 and Ridge Road, large enough for at least 4-5 cars. (41.17682°, -73.96148°)
4.75 Central Highway (limited parking). (41.19210°, -74.00450°)
6.85 Parking in Gurnee Park and Amphitheater on the east side of NY Route 45 in Mt. Ivy, 0.15 miles south of US Route 202. (41.18434°, -74.03635°)
On holidays and weekends there is additional parking in the commuter parking lot at the corner of Routes 45 and 202.

Trail Description

0.00 The section begins by crossing US Route 9W and a guard rail, near a large Tilcon sign. The trail proceeds northward on Landmark Drive, an abandoned town road formerly known as Long Clove Road, and follows the road uphill around a sharp left hook.

0.60 Make a right turn onto Scratchup Road. The trail passes the gates for the Tilcon New York quarry.

1.00 The trail swings left and uphill to reach Old Route 304. Turn left here onto the road. This is a twisting road with narrow shoulders. Remember to walk single file facing traffic.

1.15 Pass Ridge Road on the left.

1.20 The trail turns right into the woods and crosses a wet area. It continues uphill, meandering beside and sometimes over stone walls.

1.70 The trail levels off and passes by a stand of mountain laurel. After a brief descent, the trail resumes uphill climbing to reach the ridge top near another stone wall. Halfway along the descent is a white-marked trail to the left and a sign saying: "Spur Path (High Tor State Park) - 2/10 mile to the site of the historic Youmans-Van Orden House and High Tor Vineyards."

2.00 An unmarked woods road (Deer Path) turns right down the cliffs.

 

Haverstraw

4.1 View of Haverstraw from High Tor. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

 
2.30 Reach the summit of High Tor. High Tor is the highest peak on the Palisades and its open, rocky summit affords spectacular views in all directions. The Hudson River vanishes to the north behind Dunderberg Mountain. Directly below, along the Hudson, is the Town of Haverstraw. Entergy's Indian Point nuclear plant is visible across from Tomkins Cove. To the west, the rolling hills of the Ramapos and Harriman State Park may be seen. The polygonal pattern visible on the summit's rocks is a natural result of the cooling of the diabase that forms the Palisades. Colonists used the summit as a signal point during the Revolution, and it later was the site of an airplane beacon; the remains of the tower are still visible. The peak was the subject of Maxwell Anderson's play High Tor. The Long Path leaves High Tor and drops steeply into the woods.

2.45 The trail reaches the end of a fire road that it will follow gently downhill all the way to Central Highway. On the way, it runs through deciduous woods on or near the top of the ridge of the Palisades. The slope is steep to the right of the trail and gentle to the left.

3.05 The Long Path meets an unmarked trail to the right. This trail leads to a summit over the cliff edge.

3.70 The trail crosses a dirt road. To the right the road is blazed white, and heads briefly uphill and swings to the front of the open summit of Little Tor. To the left is a small artificial pond. It was the water source for the Kaatz mansion, a building demolished in the early 1970's during the construction of High Tor State Park. There is a fine view to the north, with Haverstraw directly below. As the Long Path continues to gradually descend along the ridge, it is crossed by many unmarked side trails and dirt roads.

4.45 Cross beneath a power line.

 

ts04s

4.2 Deer by the trailside. 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]

 

4.75 Cross Central Highway and enter Rockland County's South Mountain Park. The trail enters the woods on a gravel road, but just after passing the car barrier, it leaves the road and turns right onto a steep path. The trail is generally close to and parallel with the gravel road and crosses it once.

5.20 Join the gravel road briefly as it curves left. Follow the road for about 50 feet and than leave it to descend gently to the right. The Long Path is now a wide, well-cleared path through the woods following the cliff edge of the Palisades. There are extensive views to the south.

6.55 A precipice affords a view of Cheesecote Mountain and Limekiln, Catamount and Horse Stable Mountains. An old quarry and the edge of the Palisades can be seen looking down along the direction of the trail.

6.65 A view over an old quarry shows the end of the Palisades. Beyond, the Palisades ridge dips into the ground. The trail follows this last curving ridge downhill.

6.85 Reach the parking area in Gurnee Park and Amphitheater, a county park on the east side of NY Route 45.

The Hudson Highlands

The Long Path makes its first foray into genuine mountains as it passes through the Hudson Highlands. It is the first time that the trail reaches higher than 1000 feet elevation above sea level. As part of its journey north through this region, it traverses the length of two major New York State Parks, Harriman, one of the oldest, and Schunemunk Mountain, one of the newest. It also enters a part of New York State that is steeped in Trail Conference history. Many of the trails created by the Trail Conference in its infancy are contained in Harriman and Bear Mountain State Parks. The very first section of the Appalachian Trail lies in Harriman and that first section crosses the Long Path near Island Pond Mountain in Section 6. There are many, many trails throughout the Harriman and Bear Mountain State Parks, making endless loop possibilities incorporating portions of the Long Path.

 

Turkey Hill Lake from Long Mountain. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]

5. Mt. Ivy to Lake Skannatati

Features: Harriman State Park
Distance: 9.40 miles
USGS Map Quads: Thiells
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 112 (Hudson Palisades Trails), and Trail Map 118 (Southern Harriman-Bear Mountain Trails)

General Description

The Long Path heads north along the Palisades Interstate Parkway for about a mile, crosses the South Branch of Minisceongo Creek, turns west, and climbs up the side of Cheesecote Mountain before descending past Cheesecote Pond and Letchworth Village Cemetery. The trail briefly follows Call Hollow Road before turning west into Harriman State Park. Harriman State Park is a stunningly beautiful preserve of lakes, hemlock and hardwood forest, historical trails and sites, wetlands, mountains and ridges. On the portion of its route through the Park covered in this section, the Long Path keeps largely to gentle grades until it reaches Lake Skannatati.

Access

This section begins in the parking lot of South Mountain County Park on the eastside of NY Route 45, near Exit 13 of the Palisades Interstate Parkway. The trail turns west off Call Hollow Road, about 1 mile west of Exit 114 of the Palisades Interstate Parkway. The section ends at a fishermen's access parking area beside Lake Skannatati on Seven Lakes Drive, about 0.75 miles north of Kanawauke Circle.

Parking

0.00 Parking area off NY Route 45, 0.15 miles south of US Route 202. (41.18434°, -74.03635°)
2.60 Cheesecote Lane in Pomona, off North Ridge Road (3-4 cars). (41.20788°, -74.04574°)
A 0.1-mile unmarked path leads to the Long Path near Cheesecote Pond.
3.60 Along Call Hollow Road. (41.21814°, -74.04881°)
9.40 Lake Skannatati parking area. (41.24198°, -74.10243°)

Camping

5.65 Big Hill Shelter

Trail Description

0.00 Turn right (north) from the parking lot of South Mountain County Park onto NY Route 45

0.15 At the intersection of NY Route 45 and US Route 202, turn left (west) on Route 202.

0.20 At the next light turn right at the pedestrian crossing. It pays to wait for the light; traffic can be very heavy on Rte 202. Once on the northside of Rte 202, turn left. Be careful, you have to cross Thiells Mt. Ivy Road, which also is an off-ramp for the northbound Palisades Interstate Parkway. Proceed west along the northside of Rte 202, and immediately after passing underneath the Parkway, turn right. The trail goes into the woods for a moment, then emerges to cross the on and off ramps of the Parkway southbound lanes. Be careful: traffic moves fast here!

0.40 The trail makes a short right-left jog and  enter the woods at a small pine grove. The turn is indistinctly marked. The trail follows a narrow strip of land between the Palisades Interstate Parkway on the right and a chain-link fence on the left.

0.60 The trail passes under a power line and continues north along the narrow strip.

1.20 The route becomes very swampy as you reach a corner in the chain-link fence. It veers to the left away from the trail.

1.35 The trail turns right onto a grassy woods road, and in a few hundred feet turns left to continue on the bank of the South Branch of Minisceongo Creek.

1.55 Walk along the top of a stone arch over the South Branch of the Minisceongo Creek that carries the creek under the Parkway. Continue along a small tributary stream for approximately 75 yards. Cross the stream, turning away from the Parkway, to intersect a woods road. Turn right onto the road and ascend gently through a hardwood forest along a hill slope. You are entering Cheesecote Park in the Town of Haverstraw.

1.70 The trail turns left and heads up the hill. The grade moderates and the trail continues uphill, with many turns along the way.

2.00 Turn left on a grassy woods road and continue uphill. The road changes from grass to cinders. For the next 1.6 miles until Call Hollow Road, many dirt roads diverge from the road that the Long Path follows. However, the trail stays with the largest and most developed road as it twists and turns.

2.45 Reach the crest of a knob on the shoulder of Cheesecote Mountain and begin to descend, still on the woods road.

2.55 Reach Cheesecote Pond and turn left. The trail goes along the side of the pond, keeping the pond on the right. Turning right there is a camping area (permit required).

2.70 Reach a large turnaround at the southwest corner of the pond. The trail bears left and uphill for a short distance, away from the pond. It then begins a steady descent and changes to a rough cobble base.

3.00 Bear left at a Y-intersection and follow the steeper road downhill.

3.40 Shortly after crossing a power line right-of-way (May 2016: pipeline construction in progress; be prepared to detour), the trail reaches Letchworth Village Cemetery. The Long Path turns left and skirts the cemetery, then turns left again at an intersection of gravel roads. The grade levels off.

3.60 Reach Call Hollow Road and turn left along the pavement.

3.70 Turn right, leaving the road, and re-enter woods. The trail crosses Horse Chock Brook. The bridge across Horse Chock Brook that had been wiped out by Irene in 2011 has been rebuilt in March 2013 by an Eagle Scout. After crossing the brook, make a short ascent up the slope to meet a woods road. The trail turns left to follow the road.

4.25 After a brief drop into the valley of an intermittent stream, the Long Path veers right on a narrow track to ascend the valley while the woods road continues left across the valley. The trail crosses the stream and a rock wall as it continues to climb.

4.50 Reach a crest. From here it is a short drop and rise to the crest of another small knoll.

4.65 The Long Path reaches the dirt road of an AT&T buried telephone cable right-of-way. Cross the road and enter the woods on the other side. After 250 feet, turn right onto an old woods road headed toward a stream. Cross the stream (last sure water before Big Hill Shelter) and turn left as the trail begins a gradual climb.

5.00 Continue climbing over open rock with a seasonal view of the Hudson behind you.

5.10 Pass a small swamp on the left. It may be dry in summer.

5.25 After passing some small glacial erratics, the Long Path enters mountain laurel, turns left and begins a gradual downhill.

5.40 Turn left as the trail drops downhill.

5.45 Reach an intersection with the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail (SBM) (yellow). The Long Path and SBM continue jointly over ledges to climb up to Big Hill Shelter. The woods road leading left from this junction leads to Second Reservoir.

 

big_hill

5.1 Big Hill Shelter. 2008 [JAKOB FRANKE]


5.70 Arrive at Big Hill Shelter. Built in 1927, this stone shelter has three fireplaces. The Long Path veers right at the shelter as the SBM continues straight ahead. The Long Path follows a fire road back to the AT&T right-of-way.

5.85 Cross AT&T right-of-way and continue through laurel.

5.95 Begin a short climb up a grassy slope.

6.10 Turn right onto a woods road.

6.15 Cross an intermittent stream on the rocks and contour around a small hill.

6.40 The trail passes just to the north of a 727 plane crash site. Northwest Airlines flight 6231, chartered by the Football Baltimore Colts, took off from JFK airport to pick up the team in Buffalo, NY. During take off an ice storm caused their instruments to provide inaccurate airspeed readings, the plane stalled and crashed here in Harriman Park on December 1, 1974. All 3 crew members [Captain John B. Lagorio, First Officer & Co-Pilot Walter A. (Jim) Zadra, and Second Officer James (Jim) F. Cox, Jr.] lost their lives. This tragic accident drove changes in airline training throughout the world, making flying safer for everyone. Please do not remove items from this site, as it is a memorial to those who lost their lives here.

6.60 After passing through a boulder field, turn right on an old woods road. The trail passes under a telephone line and then through a red pine grove before descending through a swamp, crossing its outlet on a wooden bridge. The trail goes up and down through a hardwood forest rich in oak. Note: The USGS Thiells topographic map of the area from mile 7.15 to mile 8.00 is well out-of-date and shows incorrect road locations.

7.05 The Long Path makes a left turn uphill. Straight ahead, an unmarked trail leads in 0.15 miles to St. John's-in-the-Wilderness Church, the site of the hiking community's annual Palm Sunday pilgrimage.

7.55 Turn right and, in 250 feet, cross a grassy road. (In the opposite direction, one must bear right a bit when crossing the road.) The trail becomes wide and grassy as it approaches Lake Welch Drive.

 

Pb20099.lpg

5.2 St. Johns-in-the-Wilderness Church . 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]


7.70 Cross Lake Welch Drive near its intersection with St. John's Road (formerly Johnsontown Road). The Long Path ascends on an old woods road, at first steeply and with several turns, through open, glade-like forest.

7.90 Bear right, still heading uphill, as another woods road goes left. In 200 feet, the trail turns left on a narrow path as the woods road continues straight ahead. After crossing a rock wall, the trail reaches an open knoll with an old stone foundation on the left and cellar holes on both sides of the trail. This was the site of the Charles Conklin farm. Once past the foundation, the trail enters brushier woods and begins to descend.

8.25 The Beech Trail (blue) starts to the right. A few hundred feet farther on, an unmarked trail goes off to the right as the Long Path bears left and begins to descend to an intermittent stream.

8.80 Cross the rocky outlet stream of a large marsh that is all but hidden to the right. The trail continues on a grassy woods road.

8.90 Reach Rockland County Route 106 (also known as Gate Hill Road or Old Route 210), turn right and follow the road for 250 feet. The trail then crosses the road and heads diagonally uphill into the woods. Not long after, it makes a left turn onto a woods road. Cross under a telephone line. Two additional left turns bring the trail past the south end of Lake Askoti.

9.35 Reach Seven Lakes Drive. Turn right, cross the bridge over the outlet of Lake Askoti and enter the woods on the opposite side of the road, across the guard rail. The trail descends along the stream and swings to the right, passing Lake Skannatati on the left.

9.40 The trail reaches a paved parking lot beside the lake. To continue, follow the shore of Lake Skannatati north through the parking lot.

6. Lake Skannatati to US Route 6

Features: Harriman State Park, Surebridge Swamp, Appalachian Trail Crossing, and Stockbridge Mountain
Distance: 10.15 miles
USGS Map Quads: Thiells and Popolopen Lake
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 119 (Northern Harriman-Bear Mountain Trails)

General Description

This section of the trail continues through Harriman State Park. The Long Path crosses many woods roads and other trails within the park, making possible various loop hikes. The trail traverses hemlock forests and rhododendron groves, and passes by large swamps. It then climbs and follows along the long, linear ridge of Stockbridge Mountain. Upon descending from the mountain, the trail passes another swamp before reaching US Route 6.

Access

To reach the beginning of the section from the New York State Thruway, take Exit 15 (Suffern). Continue north on NY Route 17 to Sloatsburg. Just north of the village, turn right onto Seven Lakes Drive. This section starts at the fishing access parking lot off of Seven Lakes Drive at Lake Skannatati, about 0.75 mile north of Kanawauke Circle. From the Palisades Interstate Parkway, take Exit 15, go west on Gate Hill Road and Rockland County Route 106 to Kanawauke Circle, and then go north for 0.75 mile on Seven Lakes Drive.

Parking

0.00 Lake Skannatati parking area. (41.241979°, -74.102427°)
5.75 Tiorati Circle picnic area, about 0.5 mile east of the Long Path crossing of Arden Valley Road (fee charged seasonally). (41.275190°, -74.089036°)
10.15 Parking area off Route 6. (41.315976°, -74.050148°)

Camping

4.45 Cohasset Shelter.
8.00 Stockbridge Shelter.

Trail Description

10lpg

6.1 Lake Skannatati. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

0.00 The section begins at the Lake Skannatati parking area off Seven Lakes Drive. Follow the shore of Lake Skannatati north through the parking area. At the northeast end of the lake, where the Arden-Surebridge Trail (A-SB) (red triangle on white) starts on the right, turn left into the woods and follow the north shore of the lake. About halfway along the north shore, the Long Path veers away from the lake, goes over a small ridge and drops back to the west arm of the lake. After undulating up and down along the lake's western shore, the trail crosses the lake's swampy inlet stream and begins a series of longer ups and downs.

1.25 The Long Path turns left and joins a woods road, the route of the Dunning Trail (yellow). In 250 feet, the Long Path turns right on a footpath, as the Dunning Trail continues along the woods road. The Long Path goes over a grassy ledge perched on a hill slope and passes a shaft of the abandoned Hogencamp Mine, one of the largest iron mines inside the Park boundary. Stone foundations on the side of the trail are remnants of this mining community.

1.40 The trail turns right near an overhanging rock, known as Cape Horn, to continue up an old stone-lined road. After passing through a saddle, the trail begins to descend through forest rich in hemlock and mountain laurel. It joins an old woods road, the continuation of the Surebridge Mine Road.

2.00 Reach Times Square, the junction of the Long Path, the A-SB Trail (red triangle on white) and the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail (red dot on white). The Long Path continues west jointly with the A-SB Trail on the Surebridge Mine Road through fairly level terrain.

2.10 The Long Path and the A-SB Trail turn left, leaving Surebridge Mine Road, and rise gently through a forest of hemlock and white pine. Surebridge Swamp becomes visible below on the right. The trail now alternates through laurel, hardwoods, hemlocks and large rhododendrons.

2.60 The Lichen Trail (blue L on a white square) starts to the left as the Long Path and A-SB continue on a downgrade to pass a swampy area on the right. The trails approach and veer away from a hemlock swamp and then run along the swamp's intermittent outlet stream before crossing the stream. The descent ends as the combined trails begin to pass a marsh on the right.

2.90 The White Bar Trail (horizontal white rectangle) starts to the left. In another 30 feet, the Long Path turns right as the A-SB continues straight ahead along the side of a marsh. The Long Path crosses an outlet stream and runs between the marsh and a steep, hemlock-covered slope. Upon reaching the head of the marsh, which becomes a wooded swamp, the trail follows an inlet stream. The trail then turns left and uphill, away from the stream. 

3.60 Cross the Appalachian Trail (vertical white 2x6 rectangle) in a slight dip at a prominent signpost. The sign has distances to various landmarks on both the Long Path and Appalachian Trail routes. The Long Path now rises to a broad knob, dips to a marsh, and climbs a knoll.

02-2lpg-2

6.2 Appalachian Trail Junction. 2001 [ED WALSH]  

4.30 The trail reaches the top of the knoll and begins to descend, passing a partial view of Upper Lake Cohasset on the way down.

4.45 Pass Cohasset Shelter (no water), on the left as the descent continues. This shelter was built in 1937 for the girls' camps on Upper Lake Cohasset. The trail crosses Surebridge Mine Road and, in another 0.25 mile, crosses a stream leading from a marsh on the right to Upper Lake Cohasset. The trail now crosses a series of intermittent streams and boulder fields as it approaches the road.

5.75 Cross Arden Valley Road at a horseshoe bend. The Long Path jogs left to cross the pavement opposite a wide woods road. Follow this woods road as it passes to the left of a beautiful hardwood swamp.

6.15 After the swamp ends, the Long Path climbs to the left as the woods road continues straight ahead to the AT and the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. The trail now ascends to the long ridge of Stockbridge Mountain. Once on the bedrock outcrop of the ridge, the trail follows the gentle ups and downs of the crest northeast.

7.80 The trail passes under a large cantilevered rock, known as Hippo Rock, which juts toward the trail from the west.

7.90 The Menomine Trail (yellow), which leads to the Silvermine picnic area, leaves to the right in a valley.

8.00 The trail reaches the Stockbridge Shelter, which is a handsome rock-and-mortar structure with a plank floor. It sits on a rock outcrop with a fine view to the south. No water is available.

8.30 The Long Path drops steeply over a boulder slope. The Cave Shelter is set into an overhang near the base of its rock face. It is damp and hardly an inviting place to spend the night. Again, no water is available. From here, the trend is downhill to US Route 6. As the descent progresses, trees get larger and form a closed canopy; blueberry becomes more dominant in the understory.

9.10 The trail turns left and passes to the left of a small knob that is the point of a large saddle. After crossing from the right to the left side of a valley and back again, the trail climbs out of the valley. It reaches and turns left on a woods road to US Route 6.

10.00 The trail crosses US Route 6 and continues up the exit road from the parking area on the north side of Route 6. (This road is the old Route 6, used until 1967, when the present road was opened to traffic).

10.15 The section ends shortly after the pavement widens to allow parking. There is kiosk here with a description and map of the Long Path. To continue, turn left and enter the woods.

7. US Route 6 to NY Route 32 (Town of Woodbury)

Features: Harriman State Park, Howell, Brooks and Blackcap Mountains, and the Torrey Memorial on Long Mountain
Distance: 11.60 miles
USGS Map Quads: Popolopen Lake
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 119 (Northern Harriman-Bear Mountain Trails), and Trail Map 114 (West Hudson Trails)

General Description

This section is the last of the three within Harriman State Park, and is by far the most rugged. The Long Path climbs four peaks, often on steep grades both up and down. The exertion is worth the effort because of views of dramatic geology, especially in the U-shaped valley between Howell and Brooks Mountains. The trail frequently borders West Point Military Reservation. The last part of this section is outside of Harriman State Park and generally follows suburban and rural roads.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16, Harriman. Continue east on US Route 6. Or take the Palisades Interstate Parkway to Exit 18, and continue west on Route 6. The section starts at a parking area in a narrow, unmarked loop on the north side of Route 6. Entry by car is one way from the east side of the loop, about 1.2 miles west of the Long Mountain Circle.

Parking

0.00 Parking area off Route 6. (41.315976°, -74.050148°)
3.85 There is parking along NY Route 293 near Barnes Lake (0.2 mi north of US Route 6), about 0.25 mi south of where the Long Path crosses the road. (41.326418°, -74.082527°)
6.45 Near the end of Estrada Road (pay attention to the 'No Parking' signs and do not block the gate). (41.320196°, -74.106322°)
11.60 Intersection of Evans Drive and NY Route 32, about 0.2 miles south of the Long Path's crossing of Route 32. (41.360910°, -74.107742°)

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path leaves the pavement of the parking area loop road at the interpretive kiosk honoring Raymond H. Torrey and the Long Path. It heads north into the woods on a wide gravel road. The road becomes grassy as it passes through oak forest with open, short and shrubby understory. The descent into a hollow steepens as traffic noises fade.

0.30 Pass an old woods road going down to the left. Immediately thereafter, the Popolopen Gorge Trail (red square on white) leaves to the right. The Long Path turns left after this and begins to climb toward the summit of Long Mountain.

0.75 The Long Path reaches the summit of Long Mountain, the site of the Torrey Memorial. There is a spectacular 360-degree view from the summit with Bear Mountain visible to the east and Turkey Hill Lake directly below.

 

long-mtn

7.1 and 7.2 View from Long Mountain and Torrey Memorial. 2001 [TODD SCHREIBMAN]

0.80 The Long Path continues past the Torrey Memorial and starts a gradual descent from Long Mountain. In another 500 feet, the trail turns left and descends through a series of long switchbacks.

1.25 The trail intersects an old woods road to the left and crosses Deep Hollow Brook (the crossing can be difficult after a heavy rain). It then turns right and continues on a path alongside the stream. Meet a second stream paralleling the trail on the left. Shortly thereafter, the trail turns left at an opening in the woods and crosses the stream on rocks. It then ascends and approaches a cleared swath along the West Point boundary. The trail follows the boundary line, with some detours to the left and back again, for about half a mile. The trail eventually leaves the boundary permanently and heads left to top out at a knoll with lots of blueberries.

2.30 Reach the summit of Howell Mountain. The trail briefly continues its gentle descent on a curve, slabbing a rise to the right. Then, it abruptly turns left and begins a steep plunge into Brooks Hollow. The Long Path traverses a flat terrace before another left turn over the edge completes the descent, this time with switchbacks.

2.70 Cross the outlet stream from Lake Massawippa in the middle of Brooks Hollow, a classic U-shaped post-glacial valley. Its broad, flat floor with several intermittent streambeds, curves upward on both sides at a rapidly increasing pitch. Once across the stream, the trail turns left and goes upstream for a short distance before continuing across the valley floor. It reaches the valley wall and the trail begins a steep ascent of Brooks Mountain, principally by two long switchbacks. The second switchback becomes gentler in grade as it merges with the southwest trending crest of Brooks Mountain. Once on the crest, the grade is gently uphill with views of the steeply plunging valley to the left.

3.35 The ridge ends suddenly at a rocky knob. The Long Path turns to descend steeply to the left at first and then curves to the right around the end of the ridge. It reaches and climbs out of the small valley to views of Lake Massawippa a few hundred feet downhill to the left. The trail next undulates up and down through laurel and then blueberry, the dominant understory plants.

3.85 Reach NY Route 293 near a stream. Cross the road at the end of the guardrail, re-enter the woods, and start ascending.

4.05 The trail crosses a power line. The trail now ascends, often steeply, up the shoulder of Blackcap Mountain. Once attained, it follows the ridge crest southwest, closely paralleling the West Point boundary, until the trail descends toward Route 6.

4.75 The trail crosses another power line, a small stream, and a stand of mountain laurel.

5.30 The trail approaches US Route 6 and turns west along the highway. The next blazes are about 30 feet inside the woods bordering the road, next to a chain-link fence.

5.60 Just before a small stream the trail turns left, leaves the woods, and turns right to cross a road (OP Charlie Road) near a West Point entrance gate. Continue through the wide grassy berme along Route 6. The trail veers to the right and crosses a clearing on a diagonal to the northwest. At the opposite side of the clearing, there is a telephone pole at the end of an abandoned paved road (the old Route 6).

5.85 Continue along the abandoned paved road.

6.45 Reach a barricade across the road with a small vehicle turnaround just beyond, on the right. The trail continues straight ahead on what is now known as Estrada Road, a quiet residential street, past several houses. Thomas Estrada-Palma, the first president of Cuba (1902-06), lived here from 1879 to 1902 while he headed a junta that financed the Cuban Revolution.

7.40 Continue straight, staying on Estrada Road. In 200 feet, in sight of the New York State Thruway, turn right onto Abrams Road. Pass Stone Gate Road on the right.

8.20 At a T-intersection, go right on Smith Clove Road (Orange County Route 9) and head away from the Thruway.

8.70 Pass a golf course entrance on right.

8.80 Go left on Pine Hill Road.

9.40 Cross the Thruway and follow Pine Hill Road downhill as it curves.

9.70 Follow Pine Hill Road under the railroad. 

9.80 Just before Pine Hill Road crosses Woodbury Creek, the Long Path turns right on a gravel road and gas-pipeline right-of-way, which runs between the railroad tracks and Woodbury Creek.

10.70 Cross a seasonal stream.

11.30 Pass underneath a railroad trestle (formerly the Graham Line of the Erie Railroad, now the Metro-North Port Jervis Line) and go down the embankment to Woodbury Creek. After crossing the creek, the trail turns right and climbs to Route 32, which it crosses (use caution, as Route 32 is a very busy highway).

11.35 Section 7 ends about 100 ft north of the trestle, where the Long Path turns left and climbs an embankment.

 

cardinal-flower-woodbury

7.3 Cardinal flowers along the Woodbury Creek. 2010 [JAKOB FRANKE]  

8. NY Route 32 (Town of Woodbury) to Heritage Trail in Monroe

Feature: Schunemunk Mountain State Park
Distance: 8.85 miles
USGS Map Quads: Popolopen Lake, Cornwall, Maybrook, and Monroe
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 114 (West Hudson Trails)

General Description

The trail proceeds for a short distance just inside the woods on the south side of the right-of-way of the Metro-North Port Jervis Line, before beginning a steep ascent of Schunemunk Mountain. Schunemunk (pronounced "skun-uh-munk") is a northeast-southwest trending ridge, with steep sides and a nearly level top. The mountain was formerly owned by the Star Expansion Company. In 1996, the Open Space Institute acquired 2,100 acres of land on the mountain (including most of its ridgetop), and it transferred this parcel to the State of New York in 2003, securing its lasting protection and ensuring public access for future generations. Schunemunk Mountain State Park was New York's 163rd state park. Upon reaching the Jessup Trail and Highlands Trail, which are co-aligned along the entire length of the mountain, the Long Path turns south and is co-aligned with these two trails. As the trail heads south, the height of the ridge becomes lower, but it still affords many fine views. The trail soon enters private lands. Hunting is allowed on these lands (as well as on the northern portion of Schunemunk Mountain); hikers should be aware of the dates of the various hunting seasons and plan accordingly. At the southwest end of the mountain, the Jessup Trail ends in Gonzaga Park,* while the Long Path and Highlands Trail continue toward the Heritage Trail in the Town of Monroe. The trails follow a mix of local roads and footpaths through privately-owned woods and pass along Orange-Rockland Lake. This section ends in a commuter parking lot adjacent to NY Route 17 (future Interstate 86).

Access

Take the New York State Thruway north to Exit 16, Harriman. Continue north on NY Route 32. Approximately 1.8 miles north of the "Woodbury Police" sign in the Village of Highland Mills, you will pass under a high railroad trestle painted black. The Long Path leaves the west side of the road about 50 feet north of the trestle.

Parking

0.00 At the intersection of Evans Drive and NY Route 32, about 0.2 mile south of the railroad trestle. (41.36085°, -74.10769°)
6.55 In Gonzaga Park, about 1.0 mile from Exit 130 of Route 17. (41.35669°, -74.17556°)
8.80 Monroe commuter parking area at Exit 129 of Route 17. (41.34678°, -74.19807°)

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path crosses NY Route 32 across from a driveway, about 100 feet north of the high railroad trestle that goes over the road. It climbs a wooded embankment on rock steps, crosses under a railroad trestle on a gravel road and turns right to climb rock steps and a steep embankment (watch for poison ivy) to the grade of the tracks. The trail continues between a fence and an earth embankment for about 300 ft.  At the end of the fence the trail crosses the earth berm, then makes a quick right and follows the bottom of the berm. After a short distance the trail climbs up onto the berm which runs along the railroad. The Long Path soon drops off the berm, goes up and down a bit, then turns away from the railroad.

0.45 The trail reaches a woods road and turns left. Almost immdiately, just before reaching a gully, the trail turns right into the woods, soon reaching another woods road. Follow this second road to the right as it begins a meandering ascent of Schunemunk Mountain, crossing several stone walls along the way.

0.85 The trail turns left onto a narrow track and heads uphill. It now ascends steadily, first steeply, then more gradually, passing several good viewpoints, including one at Little Knob.

1.70 Reach High Knob. This open ridgetop has fine views up and down the valley and of the Hudson River to the north. The trail continues on the top of this flat ridge and then goes left on rocks forming the west side of the ridge. It descends to approach the head of the valley between High Knob and the main ridge to the west. As the gap between the ridges closes, the trail drops into the woods to cross two small rocky ravines before ascending a boulder-strewn slope to the opposite ridge. On the low ridge between the two ravines an unmarked trail goes right, and shortly afterwards, another unmarked trail goes left.

2.30 The Long Path crosses the old Woodbury Park trail. Traces of red blazes are still visible.

2.70 The trail crosses Dark Hollow Brook and climbs to the main ridge of Schunemunk Mountain.

2.90 The Long Path reaches the Jessup Trail (yellow) near the top of the ridge. This is also the route of the Highlands Trail (teal diamond), which heads northeast to Storm King Mountain and southwest through Sterling Forest State Park to the Delaware River in Riegelsville, NJ. The orange-blazed trail straight ahead is the Western Ridge Trail, the former route of the Long Path. The Long Path turns left (south) and is co-aligned with the Jessup Trail to its end. Follow the yellow Jessup Trail blazes, as the Long Path and Highlands Trail are marked with their trail logos only at occasional intervals and at junctions.

 

Schunemunk

8.1 View from the co-aligned Jessup-HT-LP on Schunemunk. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

3.35 An unmarked side trail on the right leads to a woods road that descends to Mountain Lodge Road in about 0.6 mile. Many other unmarked trails intersect the Long Path in the next three miles.

3.55 The trail passes an antenna park and leaves Schunemunk State Park. After bearing left at a fork, the trail curves to the left and heads towards the eastern side of the ridge. It emerges onto an open rock ledge, with views to the east.

4.40 The trail turns sharply right and soon crosses a small stream.

4.50 The trail climbs to the crest of the western side of the ridge and reaches a panoramic west-facing viewpoint.

4.60 The trail reaches another west-facing viewpoint and bears left, reentering the woods.

4.80 Pass a limited east-facing viewpoint and then a broader west-facing viewpoint.

5.05 The trail climbs to another panoramic west-facing viewpoint. It then descends steeply to a col and climbs rock ledges. For the next mile, the trail follows undulating terrain, with a number of ups and downs.

6.05 The trail emerges on a rock ledge, with panoramic views on both sides of the ridge – both to the east and to the west. The Shawangunks and the Catskills are visible to the northwest. From this viewpoint – the last one along the ridge – the trail descends steadily on a woods road.

6.40 Bear right at a fork, leaving the main woods road and continuing to descend on a narrower road.

6.55 The trail reaches paved Seven Springs Road, which is closed to vehicular traffic. The Long Path and Highlands Trail continue across Seven Springs Road. (The Jessup Trail turns right onto the road and ends in 0.1 mi at a gate, with the parking lot of Gonzaga Park* on the right.) The trail descends slightly, crosses a small drainage area, and passes by a spring house. Shortly thereafter there is a small cemetery on the right. The trail soon reaches an old woods road which it follows to the right for a few hundred feet to an ATT powerline cable right-of-way. The trail turns left here, crosses a couple of stone walls, and reaches Seven Springs Mountain Road (Orange County Route 44) and the entrance of Gonzaga Park.

 

Gonzaga

 8.2 and 8.3 Spring house and Davison Cemetery in Gonzaga Park. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

6.80 The trail crosses County Route 44 and continues on Seven Springs Road.

7.25 The trail turns right into the woods, passing several stone walls and interesting low rock ledges. Near NY Route 208 there are foundations of an old homestead.

8.00 The Long Path and Highlands Trail cross Route 208 and enter the woods near Orange-Rockland Lake.

8.20 The trail reaches the lake and follows its shoreline.

8.40 The trail reaches Museum Village Road, turns left, and follows the road, crossing Route 17/Interstate 86.

8.75 Turn left onto Orange and Rockland Road and into a commuter parking lot.

8.85 Once in the parking lot, make a U-turn to find the Heritage Trail, a paved rail-trail. This is the end of Long Path Section 8. 


 

* Gonzaga Park is a 216-acre former Jesuit retreat that was acquired by Orange County in 2001 and has since been developed as a county park. The park is located in the towns of Blooming Grove, Monroe, and Woodbury, and there still are a few of the original buildings on the site, including a chapel.

Orange County and the Shawangunks

These sections of the Long Path provide the bridge between the low mountains of the Hudson Highlands in the south and the beginnings of the Catskills in the north. In between lie many small villages and towns set in the gently rolling hills of Orange County. Although not as exciting as sections further north or south, walking the backroads of Orange County move one into an older time and a way of life different from the frenetic pace of city living. It is only by walking the roads ordinarily driven that one can appreciate the different pace of rural living and its dependence on the pace of nature rather than the pace of people. In addition to a large portion of the southern Shawangunk Ridge these sections pass the Basha Kill, a large and beautiful wetland, on their way to Sam's Point Preserve and Minnewaska State Park Preserve. These are one of the most beautiful and interesting areas of the Hudson Valley. Though certainly not the highest or the most exotic parks in New York, they are some of the most colorful in character with their rich and varied flora, fauna, and vistas.

 

sams-point

Sam's Point Preserve. 2008 [JAKOB FRANKE]

9. Heritage Trail (Orange County rail-trail)

Feature: Heritage Trail (Orange County rail-trail)
Distance: 11.40 miles
USGS Map Quads: Monroe, Warwick, and Goshen
County Map: http://www.orangecountynyparks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/herit-trail.pdf

General Description

This section follows the Heritage Trail — a 10-foot wide trail on the right-of-way of the former Erie Railroad. The trail currently extends for 11.85 miles from the Town of Monroe to Hartley Road in the Town of Goshen, near the City of Middletown, and it features sections of both asphalt and limestone surface. It winds through a bird/wildlife sanctuary and passes historic landmarks, murmuring streams, rolling meadows and friendly communities. Trail users may enjoy biking, walking, rollerblading and nature study, as well as shopping and dining in the local villages. Goshen is the picturesque county seat of Orange County, and the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame (open seven days a week) is definitely worth a visit.  Access points to the trail are in Monroe, Chester and Goshen, all with convenient parking. There are bicycles for rent in Monroe and in Goshen, and there is a motel in Goshen. The Green Onion, located just off the Heritage Trail in Chester, hosts evening events and a farmers market every Saturday during growing seasons.

Access

Take the New York StateThruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Proceed west on NY Route17/Interstate 86 for three miles to Exit 129. Turn left on Museum Village Road and turn left again onto Orange and Rockland Road immediately after crossing over Route 17, into a commuter parking lot and Park & Ride.

Parking

0.00 Commuter parking lot in Monroe, off Exit 129 on Route 17. (41.34678°, -74.19807°)
4.15 At the Chester Depot Museum in the Village of Chester, off Exit 126 on Route 17. (41.36258°, -74.26969°)
8.30 Parking lot at the end of St. James Place in the Village of Goshen, off Exit 124 on Route 17. (41.40023°, -74.32294°)
11.40 Hartley Road, at the end of this there is aparking area 200 feet south of the trail. (41.40903°, -74.37190°)

Trail Description

0.00 The trail makes a sharp right onto the Heritage Trail, which is an Orange County paved (asphalt) rail-trail.

0.75 The trail crosses underneath Route 17. Just before the next bridge is a small cemetery (Tuthill Cemetery? Oxford Depot Cemetery?) on the right-hand side of the trail.

1.10 The Highlands Trail leaves the rail-trail immediately after passing the cemetery, and continues on Conty Route 51 (Craigville Road). The LP continues on the rail-trail. The trail passes through farmlands.

2.60 The Heritage Trail passes the old Camp LaGuardia. This used to be a New York City homeless shelter, but it is currently being redeveloped.

3.70 Near Chester, there is a black soil district north of the trail, known for its onion farms.

4.15 The trail passes through the Village of Chester, which has eateries and ice cream stores.

 

Goshen

9.1 and 9.2 Village of Goshen. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


8.30 Reach the end of the paved section of the Heritage Trail in the Village of Goshen. There is a creamery right next to the trail, and there are restaurants, shops and the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame (open seven days a week) in town. This museum is well worth a visit. The trail turns right onto St. James Place, then turns left onto South Church Street.

8.50 At the light, the trail crosses Route 207 and follows the second road left (West Main Street) for about 0.5 miles.

9.00 The trail turns sharply right onto a driveway, across from St. John's Cemetery.

9.05 The trail immediately turns sharp left onto the rail-trail, which is paved with crushed limestone at this end.

9.45 The trail crosses underneath Route 17, goes by a sewage treatment plant, then passes by attractive wetlands and ponds.

11.40 The trail reaches Hartley Road, to continue to the next section cross the road and continue on the Heritage Trail.

 

Heritage Trail

9.3 Heritage Trail west of Goshen. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

10. Heritage Trail in Goshen to Mountain Road in Greenville

Features: Roadwalk through rural Orange County
Distance: 14.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Goshen, Middletown, and Otisville
Trail Conference Maps: Online SRT Map #1 in PDF format

General Description

The Long Path follows several roads in south-western Orange County as it approaches the Shawangunks. This is still a fairly unpopulated area of the county, and the trail passes many farms and fields with expansive views. Some of the fields have disappeared though during the building boom of the last several decades. This section is suitable for bicycling since it is relatively free of truck traffic.

Access

Take New York StateThruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Proceed west on NY Route17/Interstate 86 for about 12 miles to Exit 123 (US Route6/NY Route 17M). Proceed west on Route 6 for 1.9 miles to Hartley Road and turn right. The end of the Heritage Trail is in 0.8 mile on your right. Park on the side of the road.

Parking

0.00 There is a parking area 200 feet south of the trail on Hartley Road. (41.40903°, -74.37190°)
14.55 There is a parking area at the end of this section, there is also room for several cars a few hundred feet south of the main parking area on Mountain Road in Greenville. (41.39199°, -74.59952°)

Trail Description

 

Wallkill

10.1 Wallkill River. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

0.00 The Long Path reaches and crosses Hartley Road and continues to follow the Heritage Trail.

1.30 The trail tuns left onto County Route 50, across the road the Heritage Trail continues straight. Across the street to the right of the Heritage Trail is the old Wawayanda Inn (now Mason's Marketplace and tap room).

1.85 Cross Route 6/17M (where County Route 50 becomes County Route 12), and soon after cross Denton Hill Road.

 

Hampton

10.2 Wawayanda Inn in the Hamlet of Hampton. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


2.05 The trail turns right onto Ridgebury Road.

4.90 Turn right onto Ridgebury Hill Road. There is a deli at the corner, and soon after the Town of Wawayanda town hall and DPW building are on the right.

5.20 The trail veers left onto Wilcox Road and passes by "The Pine Museum" (open on Wednesdays from 1-3 pm, between April 1 and December 24, or by appointment — call Ed Horan @ 1-845-355-8342).

5.40 Wilcox Road joins Ridgebury Hill Road again.

5.75 The Long Path turns right onto Route 6.

6.00 The trail turns left onto McBride Road.

6.80 At the end of McBride Road, the Long Path turns left onto County Route 49.

6.90 Turn right onto R. Hunter Place.

7.15 The trail reaches Mount Orange Road. Continue straight.

8.15 Mount Orange Road makes a sharp right turn and passes in about one-tenth of a mile over Interstate 84.

9.15 The Long Path turns left onto Remey Road. 

9.30 The trail turns left onto South Centerville Road.

9.90 South Centerville Road turns left. The Long Path continues on Mullock Road (County Route 81) which it follows to Mountain Road.

 

Cemtery Mullock Road 

10.3 Cemetery on Mullock Road. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]
 

11.40 Cross Greenville Turnpike.

11.55 Pass a small cemetery on the left.

11.80 Cross Eatontown Road.

12.85 Cross Fort Van Tyle Road.

13.55 Turn left onto Mountain Road (County Route 35).

14.35 Pass Schoolhouse Road on the left.

14.55 The trail reaches the entrance to aparking area on the right  (across from No. 1032) into a detached state forest parcel, part of the Huckleberry Ridge State Forest. This is the start of the next section.

11. Mountain Road in Greenville to the Basha Kill

Feature: Southern Shawangunk Ridge, Gobblers Knob, Basha Kill
Distance: 11.90 miles
USGS Map Quads: Otisville, Yankee Lake
Trail Conference Maps: Online SRT Map #1 and Map #2 in PDF format

General Description

This section is a mixed bag of woods roads, abandoned rail beds, ridgetops and wetlands. The section begins with the trail passing through the 435-acre Ridgeview parcel which was acquired in 2012 by OSI, NYNJTC and OCLT, and in 2015 was transferred to the State. It is now part of Huckleberry Ridge State Forest. The trail follows woods roads across the ridge and passes by three secluded ponds. It then reaches an abandoned section of Shin Hollow Road, which is a nice woods walking section. Here the Long Path is joined by the SRT.* The trail soon leaves Shin Hollow Road and begins a gradual descent to Guymard Turnpike, paralleling the Conrail Port Jervis line in the woods. After crossing Guymard Turnpike at a bridge over the railroad, the trail descends to the abandoned Erie Port Jervis line. It continues north on the rail bed, which it follows to NY Route 211. The trail crosses Route 211 and heads north on Orange County Route 61 (Otisville Road), descending below steep cliffs on the right. The road passes over the top of the western portal of the Otisville tunnel of the Conrail Port Jervis line. The trail then turns right into the woods and climbs steeply to a viewpoint. It continues for nearly two miles through the woods before it descends and reaches Otisville Road again. The trail turns right, then right again onto Indian Orchard Road (which becomes South Road when it enters Sullivan County), and in a few hundred yards the trail turns left into the woods and reaches the Basha Kill Rail Trail. The trail follows the abandoned "Kingston Line" of the New York, Ontario and Western Railway (O&W). While the 5.5-mile walk along the Basha Kill** is straight and level, it is a wonderful area, with many fine views across the Basha Kill, one of the largest wetlands in southern New York. In the springtime the Basha Kill fills with runoff from the nearby Catskills and Shawangunks to form a giant lake. At that time of the year, sections of the trail may be flooded. If this is the case, South Road, which parallels the Basha Kill Rail Trail nearby, can be followed to bypass flooded areas. In the summer the Basha Kill is a large wetland with many channels that are perfect for canoeing, and because it is a stop-off point on the Shawangunk migration routes, it is a splendid area for bird watching.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Take NY Route17/future Interstate 86 west to Interstate 84 in Middletown. Take Interstate 84 west to exit 2, Mountain Road. Turn right on Mountain Road and continue about 1.5 miles to no. 1032. The main gate of Ridgeview is opposite no. 1032.

Parking

0.00 Mountain Road, there is a parking area st the beginning of this section. Also a few hundred feet south of the parking are there is room for additional parking. (41.391987°, -74.599519°)
2.00 End of paved portion of Shin Hollow Road, just west of the railroad bridge, 0.35 miles south of the LP/SRT junction (41.40448°, -74.61631°)
3.45 Guymard Turnpike and rail bridge. (41.42695°, -74.59694°)
7.65 NY Route 211 and Otisville Road. (41.47619°, -74.55412°)
10.10 DEC parking area, Otisville Road and Indian Orchard Road. (41.49960°, -74.55219°)
10.35 DEC parking area. (41.50248°, -74.54892°)
10.85 DEC parking area. (41.50829°, -74.54424°)
11.90 DEC boat launch parking area. (41.51591°, -74.53713°)

Camping

The trail passes through DEC state forest parcels between between miles 0.00 and 2.00, and miles 2.4 and 3.15. At mile 5.25 more DEC land can be found to the east of the trail. Camping is also allowed in the Gobblers Knob section (mile 8.40), but the stream on this parcel is seasonal.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path passes through the parking area and around the trail crosses the field and then follows an old road.

0.25 The trail passes an gravel pit on the right, soon followed by an old spring house on the right. On the left are a couple of woods roads that go to and around two of the ponds on the property.

0.45 The Long Path crosses a gas pipeline and continues on a woods road. A couple of logging roads go right but the trail continues on the old road. A pond appears on the left.

1.05 Pass a woods road on the left that leads to a dam between two ponds. Proceed straight ahead.

1.30 At a split in the road the trail makes a left turn, passing a very nice viewpoint on a pond, then the trail turns right again. The trail now continues slowly  downhill all the way to Shin Hollow Road, passing several old roads on both sides.

 

Ridgeview-5s

11.1 Pond in Ridgeview estate.  2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


2.00 The Long Path reaches Shin Hollow Road and the Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT), and turns right. Shin Hollow Road is a woods road that is passable to jeeps heading to hunting camps along the ridge. The SRT (blue blaze) and Long Path are co-aligned from here for the next 34 miles.

2.15 A gravel road leads right uphill. The Long Path continues on Shin Hollow Road for another 150 feet, when it turns left into the woods and parallels Shin Hollow Road. After another 300 feet, the trail descends gradually on a faint old logging road. The trail turns right and parallels the ridge north.

2.50 The trail crosses a stream at the head of a beautiful waterfall. Above the waterfall is a nice place for lunch in a deep hemlock grove. The trail continues north through the hemlocks, gradually descending to just above the railroad tracks. The trail is on state land in the section from mile 2.40 to 3.15.

3.05 The trail crosses a stream above a second waterfall and continues north in the woods, just above the railroad tracks.

3.45 The trail crosses Guymard Turnpike near a bridge and follows the tracks just inside the woods. After about 0.1 miles, the trail descends into a hollow, which was formerly a passing track for heavy freight trains. After crossing the hollow, the trail climbs up to an abandoned rail bed and continues north along it. The remnants of a lead smelter are nearby.

3.85 To the right is a short gravel road that connects to Guymard Turnpike and was once the tunnel portal for the freight siding. The trail continues north along the original Erie Railroad Port Jervis line, which was the original route through Otisville Notch. When the Otisville Tunnel was constructed, a new line was constructed at a lower elevation and the original line, which the trail follows, was abandoned. The original line intersects the new line just south of the Guymard Turnpike bridge. The trail continues north along the rail bed, which is passable to passenger cars, and is lined with trees on both sides.

4.75 The trail passes the remnants of some old structures.

5.25 To the right are two trails: the Graham Fire Tower Trail (red blazes) and the Ravine Trail (white blazes), which are both almost one mile long and lead to the top of the ridge where there is a fire tower. The trails form a figure eight and are in Graham Mountain State Forest.

6.45 The Marcy-South power lines follow the rail bed north. Where the power lines intersect the rail bed, there are views across the Neversink Valley.

6.90 The Marcy-South power lines turn left and descend off the ridge. The trail continues along the rail bed as it continues north through the woods.

7.65 The rail bed reaches NY Route 211 in Otisville Notch. The trail turns left, crosses Route 211, and continues on Otisville Road (Orange County Route 61) north, descending below steep cliffs on the right. The trail passes over the top of the western portal of the former Erie Railroad's Otisville Tunnel. This line is still used daily for both passenger and freight service.

7.95 Turn right off Otisville Road and begin the steep ascent to the top of the ridge (Gobblers Knob), first continuing north, then sharply turning right (south).

8.10 Reach the top of the ridge. There is a short side trail to the right with a view south and west over the valley of the Bashakill and Neversink. The trail turns sharply left and follows the ridge to the north, then starts to descend through a young forest and levels off as it passes through a boulder field. The trail turns left, and gradually descends again.

8.80 Cross an old woods road and continue through saplings.

8.90 Reach another woods road and follow it to the right, gradually ascending.

9.15 When the trail levels turn left off the woods road and start to descend. Cross a couple more woods roads while descending.

10/3/2021 The Long Path was just relocated to eliminate the walk on Otisville Road and all but a couple of hundred feet on Indian Orchard Road. Continuing from the description above the Long Path turns right on the last woods road while descending. After following the woods road for a bit, the trail turns left off of it. The Long Path descends to Indian Orchard Road turns left onto the road and in a couple of hundred feet turns right into the woods. Continue with the description at mile 10.10 below. Proper update is coming soon.

9.85 Reach Otisville Road and turn right.

9.95 The trail turns right on Indian Orchard Road, which will become South Road in Sullivan County, and passes a parking and fishing area on the left side of the road.

10.10 The trail reaches the Basha Kill Rail Trail in about 0.1 mile.

10.20 The trail turns right on the Basha Kill Rail Trail. The rail trail is the remnants of the Port Jervis to Kingston branch of the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad (O&W). Built in direct competition to the D&H Canal, which was on the western side of the Basha Kill, it was abandoned when the O&W went bankrupt in the early 1950s. The trail is unmarked except for an occasional blue DEC disc, Long Path aqua blaze, or Long Path disc. The Basha Kill Wildlife Management Area is a huge wetland in the floodplain of the Basha Kill stream. The walk along the Basha Kill is a beautiful one. While the trail is level, there is much to see along the way. There are views across the Basha Kill toward the Catskills and east to the Shawangunks. The Basha Kill is home to many migratory birds and there are bird-feeding stations along the way. One can put a canoe into one of the many channels for a lazy trip through the wetland, or to find a location to fish. In the springtime, the Basha Kill fills up with the runoff from the mountains and becomes a large, shallow lake. In the summer, it is a green wetland, a rich home to aquatic life.

10.35 The trail passes a DEC parking area on the right.

10.85 The trail reaches another larger DEC parking area near a bridge. This area is prone to flooding and being overgrown. The trail turns left across a bridge, veers right, and crosses a bog bridge. The trail then reaches a woods road, turns left, and follows the woods road. The trail is marked with blue DEC discs.

 

Bashakill-16s

11.2 Basha Kill. 2008 [JAKOB FRANKE]


11.35 A viewing stand offers great views over the Basha Kill.

11.55 The trail reaches the rail trail again and turns left. The trail crosses a small bridge where there are views across the Basha Kill. Beyond here, the trail passes through a white birch forest.

11.90 The trail reaches a large parking area with a boat-launching site to the left. From here one can launch a canoe or other non-motorized boat in a side channel of the Basha Kill. From the side channel there are many interesting routes to either canoe or fish. Section 12 starts here.


* The Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT) starts at the Appalachian Trail at High Point, NJ and heads north to Rosendale, NY, following the Shawangunk Ridge for nearly 80 miles. The trail is blazed with blue discs on DEC land and blue 2"x3" blazes on private land. Where it is co-aligned with existing trails only an occasional circular SRT disc will be found. Use sections G1-G2 in reverse to head south from here to High Point where, at the intersection with the Appalachian Trail, you can then proceed to Harriman State Park to rejoin the main Long Path or continue south along the Kittatinnies.

** The Basha Kill is also spelled Basher Kill, Bashakill, and other variants with approximately the same pronunciation.

 

12. Basha Kill to Ferguson Road

Feature: Basha Kill, Wurtsboro Ridge
Distance: 10.50 miles
USGS Map Quads: Yankee Lake, Wurtsboro
Trail Conference Maps: Online SRT Map #2 and Map #3 in PDF format, and Trail Map 106B  (Shawangunk Trails 2019)

General Description

This section starts along the Basha Kill Rail Trail. The trail follows the abandoned "Kingston Line" of the New York, Ontario & Western (O&W) Railroad. While the walk along the Basha Kill is straight and level, it is a wonderful area, with many fine views across the Basha Kill, one of the largest wetlands in southern New York. In the springtime the Basha Kill fills with runoff from the nearby Catskills and Shawangunks to form a giant lake. At that time of the year, sections of the trail may be flooded. If this is the case, South Road, which parallels the Basha Kill Rail Trail nearby, can be followed to bypass flooded areas. In the summer the Basha Kill is a large wetland with many channels that are perfect for canoeing, and because it is a stop-off point on the Shawangunk migration routes, it is a splendid area for bird-watching. After leaving the Basha Kill the trail follows roads for about 2 miles through the Village of Wurtsboro on its way to the Wurtsboro Ridge. Upon leaving Old Route 17 (Sullivan County Route 171), the Long Path quickly gains the ridgetop. This ridgetop trail section is one of the most dramatic in southern New York, with many spectacular views in all directions. With the forest primarily scrub oak, blueberry and occasional pitch pine; the hiker is frequently above the trees with unlimited visibility. There are also sections of Shawangunk slab, though not as frequently as found in the northern Shawangunks.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Take NY Route 17 (future Interstate 86) west 31 miles to Exit 113, US Route 209 south. Take US Route 209 south 5 miles to Westbrookville. Turn left on Otisville Road and follow it for 0.4 miles to the junction with Indian Orchard Road. Turn left and follow this road (which changes into South Road upon entering Sullivan County) for almost 2 miles to a parking area on the left.

Parking

0.00 DEC boat launch parking area. (41.51591°, -74.53713°)
2.00 Main Basha Kill parking lot. (41.53595°, -74.51161°)
2.55 DEC parking area; side trail 0.1 miles to Basha Kill. (41.54184°, -74.50161°)
2.90 Another DEC parking area; side trail 0.1 miles to Basha Kill. (41.54639°, -74.49690°)
4.25 South Road, just to the right of the trail. (41.56186°, -74.48499°)
6.20 Old Wurtsboro High Line O&W Rail Station. (41.57718°, -74.46488°). A trail with white blazes connects the parking lot with the Long Path.
10.20 DEC parking lot at the corner of Ferguson and Shawanga Lodge Road, 0.70 mi from the Long Path. A trail blazed with yellow DEC markers leads from the parking lot to the Long Path. (41.60627°, -74.42649°)
10.50 Ferguson Road (still called Roosa Gap Summitville Road on some maps), 0.7 miles west of Shawanga Lodge Road). There is limited parking just to the west of the trail crossing. (41.61105°, -74.43498°)

Camping

Camping is allowed in the DEC lands on the Wurtsboro Ridge (mile 6.20 to mile 10.20).

Trail Description

0.00 This section starts in a large parking area with a boat-launching site. From here one can launch a canoe or other non-motorized boat in a side channel of the Basha Kill. From the side channel there are many interesting routes to either canoe or fish. The trail proceeds north along the edge of the Basha Kill. In this section there are many views across the open expanse of water and marshlands, as well as many bird feeding stations on the Basha Kill, making it a good area for bird-watching.

1.75 The trail crosses Haven Road. Haven Road crosses the Basha Kill on a causeway and is the only road crossing along the Basha Kill Wildlife Management Area. You will see many people fishing along the causeway. The trail continues straight ahead on the rail bed, which for this section is a gravel road that leads to the main parking area in the Basha Kill.

2.00 Reach the main parking area. The trail passes through a gate and reverts to the abandoned rail bed.

2.40 A nature trail leads left 0.1 mi to a raised platform with a spectacular view across the Basha Kill and the mountains beyond. Along this nature trail, markers identify the different trees along the way. Near the platform are several signboards that show pictures of the various flora and fauna found at this location. Unfortunately, the signs have been vandalized.

2.50 The trail passes the north end of the nature trail. In another 300 feet, an unmarked side trail of 0.1 mile leads right to a parking area.

 

Bashakill railtrail12.1 Basha Kill railway bed. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

2.90 The trail passes another side trail that leads in 0.1 miles to a parking lot.

3.20 The trail passes a private camp on the right along South Road. There are views to the Shawangunks from here. Beyond this point, the Basha Kill changes from open marshland to a stream with multiple channels that run through the forest. The trail crosses some of these channels on a series of bridges.

3.70 The trail crosses under NY Route 17 (Quickway) in a culvert and continues north.

4.25 At South Road the abandoned rail bed turns into a dead-end street with houses on both sides. The Long Path turns here left onto the road. South Road becomes Pennsylvania Avenue, which the trail follows into the Village of Wurtsboro. On the left is the Mamakating Little League Field, a charming small-town baseball stadium.

5.15 The trail turns right onto the Delaware and Hudson (D&H) Canal Trail.

5.25 Turn right on Sullivan Street. To the left is the Village of Wurtsboro, with several stores and restaurants in this section. Sullivan Street was part of the original NY Route 17 before the Quickway was constructed.

5.60 On the right is the Wurtsboro train station on the Port Jervis-Kingston O&W branch. The trail continues uphill on Old Route 17 (Sullivan County Route 171).

6.20 The trail reaches the abandoned O&W High Line right-of-way just beyond VFW Road. The Long Path turns left and climbs the dirt bank, it's just past the concrete abutment of an old railroad bridge. The Long Path climbs up the embankment into the woods. From now on the blazes are blue DEC discs with occasional LP and SRT markers.

6.40 A white-blazed side trail leads to the VFW post parking area.

6.65 Past a stream crossing, the trail switches right and then left to gain the top of the ridge. As the trail approaches the ridgetop, the trail steepens, and the forest cover begins to thin. At the higher elevations the forest is predominantly scrub oak and blueberry. As the trail reaches this dwarf forest, views begin to open up.

7.20 The trail reaches the top of the ridge, turns north and comes to a section of rock slab where there are spectacular views up and down the ridge. To the south you can see the Basha Kill Wildlife Management Area. This is an excellent area to watch migratory birds. To the west you can see the Village of Wurtsboro below, with NY Route 17 in the distance crossing the mountains to the west. Just to the north you can see Wurtsboro Airport, where it is common to see airplanes towing gliders aloft to float above the updrafts created by the ridge. To the far north the Catskill Mountains can be seen. Beyond this vantage point, the trail follows the western slopes of the ridge. Unlike the northern Shawangunk's, where the most interesting topography is in the east, the southern Shawangunk's are much more interesting on the western side. Development reaches high up on the ridge on the east side. The Long Path proceeds straight ahead just to the left of the slab, into and through the scrub oak. For the next quarter mile or so, the trail alternates between scrub oak forest with views and denser woods. It then begins to descend, gradually at first, followed by a steeper descent to a col.

8.00 The trail reaches a gravel road that leads down to the abandoned O&W railway. After crossing the old road, the trail crosses a stream, water flows in this stream even in the driest times. The trail crosses an overgrown abandoned road and then begins climbing back to the ridgetop on a series of switchbacks. As the trail reaches the scrub oak, views again open up to Wurtsboro Airport and to the south.

8.65 The trail crosses another gravel road that leads down to an abandoned lead mine. It then reaches a rock outcropping with a spectacular view north and south across the valley to the west. This point is just south of Wurtsboro Airport. The large structure below is Kohl's warehouse.

9.20 The trail reaches another dramatic viewpoint. From here it is possible to see northwest to the Catskills and northeast to Roosa Gap and Sam's Point. Beyond here the trail begins a gradual descent toward Roosa Gap with many views along the way.

 

Wurtsboro Ridge

12.2 View south from the Wurtsboro Ridge with the Basha Kill visible. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


9.60 The trail reaches a large overhanging boulder. Again, there are views into Roosa Gap and northwest to the Catskills. Below is the water-filled Summitville section of the old D&H Canal, now a county park. The towpath of the old canal has been restored here. On the ridgetop to the north is an old fire-lookout tower. The trail will pass by this tower; see next section. Beyond the boulder, the trail turns right and descends to a seasonal stream. At the seasonal stream, the trail turns left and descends more steeply along the left bank. At the bottom of the grade, the trail crosses the stream, passes through a stand of mountain laurel, and then reaches a larger stream at the bottom of Roosa Gap.

10.20 Immediately after the stream crossing the trail crosses a woods road, which to the right is blazed with yellow DEC markers and leads in about 0.7 miles to a parking area at the corner of Shawanga Lodge Road and Ferguson Road. This yellow trail passes a nice little waterfall in a ravine with slate walls. The Long Path turns left onto the woods road.

10.30 The trail turns right, off the woods road, and begins to ascend. Soon it enters private land, and the blazes change into the standard Long Path aqua blaze. Beyond the land boundary the trail climbs to Ferguson Road through a large switchback.

10.50 The trail reaches Ferguson Road, the end of Section 12. Just to the left of the trail there is room to park several cars. The trail crosses the road about 0.7 miles west of the height of land and a DEC parking lot at the corner of Shawanga Lodge Road and Ferguson Road.

13. Ferguson Road to Sam’s Point Preserve

Features: Wurtsboro Ridge and South Gully
Distance: 10.90 miles
USGS Map Quads: Wurtsboro, Ellenville, and Napanoch
Trail Conference Maps: Online SRT Map #3 in PDF format, Trail Maps 106B and 104 (Shawangunk Trails 2016)

General Description

The Long Path is co-aligned with the Shawangunk Ridge Trail north for the next eleven miles. This section is primarily ridgetop with many spectacular views in all directions. These are among the most dramatic in southern New York. The forest is primarily scrub oak, blueberry and occasional pitch pine. The low forest frequently places the hiker above the trees with unlimited visibility. There are also sections of Shawangunk slab, though not as common as found further north. The trail traverses the ridge to old Route 52, now a woods road, and follows this for a couple of miles until it reaches NY Route 52 and South Gully. The trail then enters Minnewaska State Park, and ascends through South Gully to Sam's Point Preserve.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16, Harriman. Take NY Route 17/future Interstate 86 west 29 miles to Exit 114, Highview. Turn right at the end of the exit ramp onto Old Route 17 (Sullivan County 171) and go uphill for 0.4 miles. Turn left on Shawanga Lodge Road and follow it for about 4 miles. Turn left onto Ferguson Road. The trail crosses the road about 0.7 miles west of Shawanga Lodge Road.

Parking

0.00 Ferguson Road (still called Roosa Gap Summitville Road on some maps), 0.7 miles west of Shawanga Lodge Road). There is limited roadside parking near the trail crossing. (41.61105°, -74.43498°)
0.00 DEC parking lot at the corner of Ferguson and Shawanga Lodge Road (41.60627°, -74.42649°). A trail marked with yellow DEC markers leads in 0.7 miles to the Long Path, just south of Ferguson Road. 
0.75 DEC parking lot near the fire tower. It is about 0.1 mile from the parking area to the fire tower. (41.61689°, -74.42567°)
3.50 and 4.70 DEC parking lot on Cox Road (41.64629°, -74.40142°). A red trail leaves the parking lot and connects in 0.85 mi with the Long Path at mile 3.50 when keeping left (west). When keeping right (north), the trail reaches the Long Path in about 1.2 mi at mile 4.70.
5.30 DEC parking lot on NY Route 52. (41.66694°, -74.40406°). From here it is about 0.5 mi to the Long Path, following the red-blazed woods road.
7.80 Route 52, where the Long Path crosses. Several cars can be parked at the woods road (old Route 52) and along Route 52. (41.69251°, -74.39387°)
10.90 Sam's Point Preserve visitor center (fee charged). (41.67012°, -74.36138°)

Camping

Camping on DEC land, which is from mile 0.00 to approximately mile 6.5.

Trail Description

0.00 This section starts at Ferguson Road. Just to the left (west) of the trail, there is room to park several cars. The trail crosses the road about 0.7 miles west of the height of land and parking lot at the corner of Shawanga Lodge Road and Ferguson Road. North of Ferguson Road, the blazes change back to the blue DEC disks. The trail ascends steeply back up to the ridgetop. As you climb, views open up to the south. The ridge north of Ferguson Road is higher and is thus more populated with scrub oak.

0.50 The trail levels out and reaches a spectacular view to the south. This vantage point is higher than any point since the New Jersey border, yielding a view all the way down the ridge to the High Point Monument in New Jersey. There are also views north to the Catskills. From here the trail continues north, remaining about 100 vertical feet below the ridgetop for about one-tenth of a mile, before turning right.

0.60 The trail turns right and reaches the ridge near a fire tower, which is open to the public.

0.75 The Long Path turns left on a road around the fire tower, and soon turns left again to follow the ridge north. The road continues to the right and downhill to the parking area at the end of Fire Tower Road, near the tall emergency tower of Sullivan County.

1.70 A woods road appears on the right. The trail continues north, comes to a boulder and descends east into a col between two ridges of the mountain.

2.15 After a short climb, the trail reaches the top of the lower eastern ridge and turns back north to descend to another col. There is another view from the eastern ridge northwards. The trail continues to descend from the scrub oak and enters the forest.

2.55 The trail descends through an interesting escarpment, and then turns right  to parallel it uphill to a height of land. At the height of land, the trail turns left and continues to a woods road. This road connects Cox Road on the east side of the ridge with US Route 209 on the west side of the ridge.

2.90 The trail crosses the woods road and goes through hardwood forest criss-crossed by stone walls, slowly heading uphill in a generally northerly direction. During the next 0.3 miles the trail crosses six stone walls.

3.50 The trail makes a sharp left turn and climbs up the ridge. A trail blazed with red DEC markers goes off to the right and reaches a DEC parking area on Cox Road in 0.85 miles. The Long Path goes through scrub oak with an occasional pine tree. Some of its markings are painted on the rocks. Once on the ridge, the first good views appear with the Shawangunk Ridge and Basha Kill south and the Catskill Mountains northwest. During the next mile the trail winds itself over the ridge, sometimes affording views to the west and northwest, other times northeast to southeast. On the east side of the ridge are steep ledges of 20-40 ft in height and beautiful loose-standing rock formations.

 

wurtsboro-ridge 2007-2009

13.1 Rhodora (wild azelea). 2007 [ELIZABETH AIVARS]
13.2 Wurtsboro Ridge looking north toward the Catskills. 2009 [JAKOB FRANKE]  

 

4.20 An old woods road becomes visible on the bottom of the ledges.

4.60 There are some fine last views of the Catskills, Ellenville, and Bear Hill.

4.70 Another red-blazed trail goes off to the right and reaches Cox Road in 1.2 miles. The Long Path starts heading down through a nice stand of laurel. The trail is quite steep at places.

5.30 Reach an old road blazed with red DEC markers. This road is the former connector between Route 52 in Cragsmoor and NY Route 209 in Spring Glen. The Long path turns left and follows the woods road. Although the first half of the woods road is on DEC land, the Long Path blazes are now LP aqua. (A trail blazed with yellow DEC disks goes right, then left, and in 0.7 mi reaches a DEC parking area on NY Route 52 after crossing a stream with a nice cascading fall, a short climb, and passing a couple of good viewpoints. When following the red-blazed woods road to the right, the same DEC parking area is reached in about half a mile.)

5.60 A red-blazed road leaves to the left and reaches in about a mile another DEC parking area on Old Mountain Road in Spring Glen, off Route 209. The Long Path continues straight ahead.

5.80 The road crosses a stone culvert across a stream in a ravine.

7.80 The woods road reaches NY Route 52. Cross Route 52, and turn left along the shoulder of the highway.

7.85 The Long Path now enters Minnewaska State Park. Turn right into South Gully, at the end of the guide rail, across from two houses. The trail follows an old woods road at the edge of a ravine, and steadily climbs. It comes close to a  nice stream with numerous small falls and crosses three side streams before it reaches Gully Road.

9.65 the Long Path turns left on Gully Road, crosses a stream, and immediately turns right  into the woods. The trail ascends, makes a switchback near a stream, and steadily keeps climbing.

10.55 Pass a berrypicker cabin.

10.65 The trail reaches the Sam's Point Preserve loop road and continues to the right.

10.90 Reach a split in the loop road. The Sam's Point Preserve parking lot and visitor center are to the right. A parking fee must be paid. The Long Path continues to the left.

 

south-gully2007

13.3 South Gully. 2007 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 


14. Sam's Point to Berme Road (Port Ben)

Features: Shawangunk Mountains, Verkeerder Kill Falls
Distance: 11.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Napanoch, Kerhonkson
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 104 (Shawangunk Trails)

General Description

The Long Path enters the northern Shawangunks near Lake Maratanza in Sam's Point Preserve, which is part of Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The northern Shawangunks are one of New York's most popular scenic destinations. Capped by a hard, white conglomerate, the Shawangunks form a long mountain ridge with gently dipping slopes along the surface of the conglomerate, that give way suddenly to great white cliffs. A favored spot for rock climbers from all over the northeastern US, the cliffs provide wonderful views of forested and farmed land in the valley below. In addition, the many miles of carriageways provide unparalleled mountain biking and cross-country skiing opportunities. The trail passes by one of the Shawangunk's finest waterfalls: Verkeerder Kill Falls. The trail follows the Verkeerder Kill Falls Trail (LP Aqua), High Point Trail (red) and Berrypicker Trail (blue), all with numerous views, on its way north to the Mine Hole Trail and spectacular views of the Catskills.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 17, Newburgh. Continue west on Interstate Route 84 to Exit 5. Follow NY Route 208 north to NY Route 52. Turn left onto Route 52 and follow it west to the top of the ridge at Cragsmoor. Turn right on Cragsmoor Road and follow it 1.3 miles to the middle of the Hamlet of Cragsmoor. At a three-way intersection, bear right and again make a right onto Sam's Point Road. Follow Sam's Point Road one mile to parking lot at end.

Parking

0.00 Sam's Point Preserve entrance (fee charged). (41.67003°, -74.36162°) 
11.55 There are plans for a small parking lot along Berme Road but until that has been built there is only room for one or two cars along the road. More parking is available along Foordemoor Road at the bottom of the Mine Hole Trail (41.75966°, -74.32420°) and along the Rondout Creek (41.76285°, -74.33401°), both about one mile away.

Camping

There is no camping allowed in this section, but at mile 8.05 it is only 0.6 miles west to DEC land - Witch's Hole - where camping is allowed.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path turns left near the Sam's Point visitor center parking lot and follows the road that loops around Lake Maratanza. (From the parking lot, turn right on the loop road.)

0.50 The Long Path passes under the cliffs of Sam's Point on the left and comes to a spectacular view to the right. From here you can see south along the ridge to High Point, New Jersey. You can also see across the Wallkill Valley to the Hudson Highlands to the south and east. After the view, the trail turns left and ascends along the road to the top of the cliffs.

0.60 To the left is a road that leads a short distance to Sam's Point. It is worth the detour as the view is even better than along the road. Here you are high enough to see above the high point of Cragsmoor and can see west as well as south and east. Just to the west of the ridge and ten miles south is Basha Kill Wildlife Management Area. On a clear day, you can see all the way into New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The Long Path continues straight ahead on the road, passing through a dense pitch pine forest.

1.05 Reach the intersection with the road that leads down to the former commercial ice caves. About one-quarter mile straight ahead is Lake Maratanza. The Long Path turns right and follows the road to the ice caves a short distance.

1.10 The Long Path turns left and leaves the road. (A side trip to explore the ice caves and return to this junction takes less than an hour and is well worth the time.) The trail ascends through the blueberry bushes for a short distance and then descends gradually through a mixed blueberry-pitch pine forest.

1.25 The trail gradually turns left and goes through an open area covered with blueberry bushes. There are continuous views north towards Mud Pond and Minnewaska State Park with Gertrude's Nose and Castle Point prominent on the skyline.

1.45 The trail enters a denser forest of pitch pine and blueberry.

1.65 The trail enters a hardwood forest with a stream running through the middle. Here a highly unusual stand of birch is found in the middle of the pitch pine and blueberry woods.

1.75 The trail exits the hardwood forest and reemerges in the pitch pine and blueberry scrub. Again there are views towards Minnewaska State Park.

2.00 The Long Path intersects the old trail that once ran from Lake Maratanza to Verkeerder Kill Falls. The trail left to Lake Maratanza is now closed. The Long Path turns right and follows the other branch of the old trail as it  descends towards the falls. The forest gradually changes from one of pitch pine and blueberry to a hardwood forest.

2.60 The trail enters a hemlock forest on private property.

2.85 The trail crosses Verkeerder Kill. There are several channels and the crossing may be difficult in times of high water.

 

14.1 Verkeerder Kill Falls. 2011 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

2.90 The trail reaches an intersection. To the right, a path leads in one hundred feet to a spectacular overlook above Verkeerder Kill Falls. Be careful here, as a misstep will send you plunging to the base of the falls 100 feet below. Please do not proceed past the overlook as the landowner has closed the trail beyond this point. The falls and the overlook are on private property. The landowner has graciously allowed us access to the falls, so please respect his rights and keep the area as you found it.  The Long Path turns left back at the intersection and begins to climb to the top of another ridge. The climb is gradual at first, then steep.

3.10 The climb becomes gentler as it gains the ridge crest. After a viewpoint to the left on a conglomerate shelf, the trail turns away from the edge and passes through an area covered with blueberry bushes and small trees.

3.20 The Long Path reaches open slab. There is an intersection with the High Point Trail (red) and the Scenic Trail (lavender). The Scenic Trail, co-blazed with blue SRT markers, follows the previous Long Path route to Mud Pond, 0.6 miles away. The Long Path turns left on the High Point Trail, which is co-blazed with aqua LP disks.

3.55 The trail reaches the first of several fine view points as it continues north along the rim of a ravine, passing alternatingly over slab rock and through blueberry and pine pitch scrub.

4.40 The trail crosses the first of several small seasonal streams as it continues along the rim of the bowl.

5.15 An unmarked trail (Cut-off Trail) on the left leads to the High Point Carriage Road.

5.35 The trail reaches High Point which affords a panoramic view of the Catskills, Mohonk, Minnewaska, and the Hudson Highlands, with the southern Shawangunks hidden behind Sam's Point.

5.70 The trail reaches the Berrypicker Trail (blue), which is co-blazed with LP disks. The red-blazed High Point Trail turns left and descends to reach the High Point Carriage Road in about a tenth of a mile. The Berrypicker Trail and Long Path continue straight ahead for about 150 feet to a fantastic view point overlooking the Rondout Valley and all of the Catskills north of there. This was the site of a fire tower of which the anchors are still visible. The Berrypicker Trail and Long Path turn right at the view point. This section passes through typical pine barren forest, over slab rock, and along many fine view points.

5.95 Great view of Minnewaska and Mohonk.

6.45 A spectacular panoramic view of the Shawangunks and the Catskills.

6.80 The trail approaches the rim of a giant bowl. In a while the forest becomes more deciduous.

7.75 Reach the end of the Berrypicker Trail and turn left on Smiley Carriage Road. From here on the trail is marked with 2x4" LP Aqua blazes. A couple of hundred feet to the right are the remnants of 4-Mile Post, one of the old berrypicker settlements.

8.05 Turn right onto the Mine Hole Trail which is an old fire road from Foordemoor Road up the mountain. The trail descends almost 1600 feet over the next 3 miles. (About 0.6 miles wesr on Smiley Road there are DEC lands - Witch's Hole - where camping is allowed.)

8.10 An unmarked trail to the left leads a to a nearby cabin. In the next mile or so the trail crosses lots of slickrock sections where cairns are used to show the way.

8.50 The trail crosses a stream.

8.70 A short side trail on the right (white blazes) leads to Panther Rock, one of the more outstanding view points along this trail.

8.90 Two large cairns mark an unmaintained trail to the left that leads to Jacob's Ladder. The trail continues downward with several views north of the Catskills and crosses several patches of bare rock that can be very slippery when wet. Slowly the size of the trees increases. The old road can be quite steep at times.

 

14.2 View of the Catskills from the Mine Hole Trail. 2011 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

10.70 Cross a seasonal stream.

10.85 The Long Path turns left off the Mine Hole Trail, crosses a wet area, and passes through some nice open woods on its way down. The Mine Hole Trail continues straight ahead as a white-blazed trail and reaches Foordemoor Road in about 0.8 miles.

11.15 The Long Path crosses a small stream, then passes through a dense stand of mountain laurel before reaching open woods again.

11.55 Reach Berme Road, which is the end of this section.

Southern Catskills

These sections of the Long Path mark the beginning of the route through Catskill Park. The Catskill Park has spectacular scenery and considerable rugged terrain. It passes over Slide Mountain, the tallest in the Catskills. Nowhere does the Long Path go higher. Small villages nestled in the valleys provide a break from the traverses through dense forests carpeting most of the Catskill Mountains. Most of its route follows DEC trails maintained by the Trail Conference. The trails are generally marked with different colored plastic markers. These are usually the only trail identification except at major trail junctions. The LP aqua paint blaze is reserved for when the trail crosses private property and road sections. As the Long Path changes frequently from one DEC trail to another, hikers must watch carefully for turns and make sure that they are on the proper trail. Most trail DEC junctions have signs that give the trail names and the direction and distance to important points.* At many of these intersections, a plastic Long Path marker indicates the route of the Long Path. Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3,500 feet (this elevation is usually marked by signs along the trails), and at locations at least 150 feet away from trails and water. The Long Path also passes several DEC lean-tos and campgrounds.

Vernooy Falls

Mushrooms. 2005 and Vernooy Falls. 2006 [JAKOB FRANKE]

_________________________________________________________________________

* The distances given on these signs are not always accurate.

15. Berme Road to Riggsville

Features: Road walk
Distance: 12.30 miles
USGS Map Quads: Napanoch, Kerhonkson
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 104 (Shawangunk Trails), and Trail Map 146 (Catskill Trails)

General Description

Currently this entire section is on roads but as soon as the DEC approves a Unit Management Plan for Vernooy Kill and Sundown state forests most of this section will get off the roads. The Long Path heads west on Berme Road to Port Ben, a hamlet in the town of Wawarsing, then turns north onto Port Ben Road and crosses the Rondout Creek. After the Long Path crosses US Route 209 it turns north on Lundy Road, then east on Rouge Harbor Road, and north again on Cherrytown and Upper Cherrytown Road to Riggsville. Although this is currently a roawalk there are many fine views and interesting features along the way and traffc volume is low on most of the roads.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 19 near Kingston, then take NY Route 209 west through Kerhonkson, to Wawarsing. In Wawarsing, immediately after crossing the Vernooy Kill, turn left on Port Ben Road, and after crossing the Rondout Creek turn left onto Berme Road. Port Ben Road and about half a mile of Berme Road are marked with LP Aqua blazes. There is little parking available where the trail reaches Berme Road.

Camping

On DEC land.

Parking

0.00 There are plans for a small parking lot along Berme Road (41.75375°, -74.33943°) but until that has been built there is only room for one or two cars along the road. More parking is available along Foordemoor Road at the bottom of the Mine Hole Trail (41.75966°, -74.32420°) and near the Rondout Creek (41.76285°, -74.33401°), both about one mile away from the Long Path.
2.80 Old quarry off Lundy Road. (41.76811°, -74.37085°)
12.30 Parking area at entrance to Catskill Park on Upper Cherrytown Road. (41.86395°, -74.34630°)

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path turns left (west) onto Berme Road and in 150 ft turns right, crossing the canal bed of the old D&H Canal.* The trail then turns left again and follows an overgrown railroad bed. Be careful, there is poison ivy present! In a few tenths of a mile the trail crosses a bridge across an old waste weir.

0.40 The trail reaches the end of Towpath Road and continues along the road. The third house on the right is across from the site of Lock 26 of the D&HCanal and is the improved locktender house.

0.55 Cross Port Ben Road and continue on Towpath Road which turns sharply right in a few hundred feet. On your left is the historical Port Ben railroad station.

0.60 Turn left onto Port Ben Road toward the bridge across the Rondout Creek. For the next half a mile the road passes farmland with great views on both sides of the road.

1.40 Turn right onto US Route 209 and cross the Vernooy Kill. The Wawarsing post office is on the right, next to the stream.

1.50 Turn left onto Lundy Road. Be careful, Route 209 is a very busy road.

1.80 Pass the last house on the left. The Vernooy Kill is on the left side of the road.

1.90 DEC land starts on the right. In the next half a mile there are a dam and rapids in the Vernooy Kill and opportunities for swimming. Both Lundy Road and Rouge (Rogue?) Harbor Road are very low traffic roads.

2.75 Cutler Road on the left crosses the stream. Future plans have the Long Path cross the Vernooy Kill here and then proceed north to the Vernooy Falls.

2.80 There is parking in an old quarry on the right.

3.10 Pass the first of two old homestead sites on the left. The second one is in another 500 feet on the left.

3.60 Turn right onto Rouge Harbor Road (unpaved). The property on the south side of the road is privately owned.

3.90 A large fence appears on the right (south) side of the road.

4.30 The end of the fence.

4.50 DEC lands start on the left (north) side of the road.

4.80 DEC lands start on the right (south) side of the road.

15.1 and 15.2 Turner cemetery off Rouge Harbor Road. 2011 [JAKOB FRANKE]

5.05 A tree on the left contains an old sign (facing east) pointing south to Turner Cemetery. About 300 feet off the road, just to the east of a stone wall, are two head stones.

5.60 End of the DEC lands.

5.80 J&J Road on the right. Rouge Harbor Road becomes paved.

6.20 Woodland Valley Ridge Road on the right. The traffic increases.

6.50 The end of Rouge Harbor Road. Turn left onto Cherrytown Road.

7.80 Pass Water Falls Road on the right – Cherrytown Road turns left.

9.00 Pass Baker Road on the left.

9.10 When Cherrytown Road ends, the trail turns left onto Upper Cherrytown Road. As it makes the turn, houses are on the left and a garage is on the right.

12.30 The section ends at a DEC parking area on the right side of the road. To continue, turn left and enter the woods on a DEC snowmobile trail.

 * The Delaware & Hudson Canal was in operation from 1828 until 1899. Following its demise the O&W used the canal right-of-way, and its railroad bed is in some places on the towpah or in the canal prism.

16. Riggsville to Bull Run

Features: Vernooy Falls, Bangle Hill
Distance: 10.10 miles
USGS Map Quads: Kerhonkson, West Shokan, Peekamoose Mountain
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 143 (Southern Catskill Trails)

General Description

The Long Path follows a snowmobile trail to Vernooy Falls, a series of lovely waterfalls. After the cascade, the Long Path leaves the snowmobile trail to follow and cross many dirt roads on gentle grades for the first six miles. The trail becomes narrower and more rugged as it passes the shoulder of Samson Mountain and climbs gently over Bangle Hill. The final descent to Bull Run is steep and long.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 19, Kingston. Continue on NY Route 28 west for about three miles, then turn left onto NY Route 28A. At Ulster County Route 3, go west to and through Samsonville. Go right on Sundown Road, then turn left onto Upper Cherrytown Road and follow it to the trailhead.

Parking

0.00 DEC parking area at entrance to CatskillPark on Upper Cherrytown Road. (41.86395°, -74.34630°)
9.65 Sundown primitive campsite on Peekamoose Road. (41.91679°, -74.43791°)
10.10 Parking area on Peekamoose Road (also known as Gulf Road and Ulster County Route 42). (41.91493°, -74.42923°)

Camping

Sundown primitive campsite and state land.

Trail Description

0.00 Opposite a DEC parking area on Upper Cherrytown Road, the Long Path enters the woods at a DEC sign with a red marker indicating a snowmobile trail. Follow the blue hiking trail markers and the large orange snowmobile markers on a wide path. The trail crosses a small stream and begins to ascend.

0.25 Cross a stream on a wooden footbridge and turn right to follow the stream. In another 0.1 miles, pass a piped spring on the left. The trail turns left away from the stream and ascends more sharply as large trees give way to a smaller forest. The trail eventually levels off and crosses several small streams.

1.70 Reach a clearing with Vernooy Falls, a series of lovely cascades in a large stream, on the left. A number of old foundations are in this area, and the hiker can explore several paths. The Long Path makes a sharp right turn on a wide cobble path as it continues to follow the blue trail markers and the orange markers of the snowmobile trail. After a gradual ascent, the trail levels off. Here, it is often wet.

Vernooy-Falls2008

16.1 Vernooy Falls. 2008 [JAKOB FRANKE]


2.65 The Long Path turns left up a gentle hill as the orange-marked snowmobile trail continues straight ahead. It reaches a gentle hilltop and becomes fairly level.

3.90 The trail turns left, the Long Path now follows a wide woods road. It crosses a stream on a large culvert. Several dirt roads lead away from the trail. A stream approaches from the left and the trail runs alongside it.

4.60 Cross a tributary stream on a wood plank bridge. The trail passes through hemlock forest before rejoining hardwoods. This section of the trail is often wet.

5.30 Cross a stream on a metal pipe culvert. In 500 feet, another dirt road goes off to the left.

5.60 The Long Path goes right on a narrow track, leaving the woods road. The trail climbs, often fairly steeply, until it reaches an abandoned woods road. Here it turns left on level ground. (For reverse direction, the turn off this woods road is a few hundred feet before the road curves to the left.)

6.10 At a small crest in the woods road, the Long Path turns right on a footpath, leaving the road. A few hundred yards further on, it makes a sharp left on a well-defined path. The general trend is gently downhill as it crosses several small streams.

7.95 The trail jogs left and runs along a level grade with a sharp drop to the right.

8.65 After reaching the top of Bangle Hill, the trail descends steeply, and then turns left and continues along a nearly level contour. 

8.85 Cross a rocky intermittent stream, turn right, and head downhill, parallel to the stream. It is now steep downwards all the way to the base of Bangle Hill. On the way down, the trail crosses the stream two more times. It then crosses the outlet of a spring and continues along the valley of the stream. The trail widens into a woods road and passes several other woods roads on the left.

Bangle_Hill

16.2 At the bottom of Bangle Hill, near Peekamoose Road. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


9.65 Reach Peekamoose Road (Ulster County Route 42) and turn right, passing  a parking area for the Sundown Primitive Campsite on the left. Occasional LP aqua blazes appear on roadside objects to mark the way.

9.75 The road crosses a bridge over Rondout Creek. In another 600 feet, it crosses a bridge over a tributary stream.

10.10 The Long Path departs from the road by turning left.

17. Bull Run to Denning Road

Features: Peekamoose and Table Mountains
Distance: 7.60 miles
USGS Map Quads: Peekamoose Mountain
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 143 (Southern Catskill Trails)

General Description

This is a rugged trail section that begins with a three-mile, 2,500-foot ascent of Peekamoose Mountain. Shortly before the top, there is a tremendous view of the Rondout Creek valley. After climbing out of the saddle between Peekamoose and Table Mountains, the trail ascends along the broad, gentle "top" of Table to the summit. From Table, the trail drops to the valley of the East Branch of the Neversink River. The trail then climbs out of the river valley and joins the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail. For the entire length of the section, the Long Path follows the blue-blazed Peekamoose-Table Trail.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 19 (Kingston). Continue on NY Route 28 west. In Boiceville, about 17 miles from the Thruway, turn left onto NY Route 28A. (Do not turn left onto Route 28A where it first meets Route 28, about 3 miles west of the Thruway.) In West Shokan, turn right onto Peekamoose Road (Ulster County Route 42, also known as Gulf Road and as Sundown-West Shokan Road). (This turn may not be marked by a street or route sign, but a large sign points to Grahamville and Town Offices.) Follow Peekamoose Road for about 10 miles to a parking area on the right.

Parking

0.00 Parking area on Peekamoose Road. (41.91493°, -74.42923°)
7.60 Parking area at end of Denning Road (1.2 miles along the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail from the end of this section). (41.96556°, -74.45248°)

Camping

0.00 Sundown Primitive Campsite (on Peekamoose Road, 0.4 miles west of trailhead).
5.20 Bouton Memorial Lean-to.
7.15 Two DEC campsites.

Trail Description

0.00 From the north side of Peekamoose Road, about 250 feet south of the parking area, the Long Path proceeds uphill on a woods road, following the blue-blazed Peekamoose-Table Trail.

0.85 The trail turns right, leaving the woods road, and continues on a footpath. The ascent is steady but varying in pitch as the trail alternates between gentle stretches and sharp, rocky climbs.

2.35 Reach Reconnoiter Rock, a rock outcrop, with a partial view to the northwest. The trail now levels off for some distance.

3.10 Just past the 3,500-foot elevation sign, reach a wide ledge to the right of the trail, with excellent views. In another 250 feet, an unmaintained trail, with some old red paint blazes, goes off to the right and descends to Peekamoose Road.

3.35 Pass a spring that comes from a small cleft in the rock to the left, a source of water. The trail now passes through a dwarf spruce forest.

3.80 Begin to climb steeply.

3.95 Reach the summit of Peekamoose Mountain, marked by a large rock to the left of the trail. Some views to the northeast are possible from the top of the rock. The trail descends steeply into the col between Peekamoose and Table Mountains.

4.20 Reach the base of the col, and begin gentle ascent.

4.40 Begin a steep ascent up Table Mountain. The grade moderates, and then becomes extremely gentle when the nearly flat ridge of Table Mountain is attained. Shortly after attaining the ridge, an unmarked trail to the right leads to an excellent viewpoint over the Burroughs Range and Rocky and Lone Mountains to the northeast.

4.80 Reach the summit of Table Mountain, on the divide between the drainage basins of the Hudson and Delaware Rivers. (The wooded summit affords no views.) Descend, sometimes steeply, as hardwoods replace spruce forest. Past the summit is an excellent view point.

5.15 Pass a sign indicating the 3,500-foot elevation.

5.20 A trail leads left to the Bouton Memorial Lean-to. About 500 ft past the turn-off to the lean-to is an excellent spring.

5.55 Begin to climb over a small knoll. The way down includes four sharp drops that are separated by gentler sections.

6.35 The descent is interrupted briefly by a second small knoll.

7.15 Two DEC campsites are indicated with yellow tent markers.

7.20 The trail drops into the broad, flat flood plain of the East Branch of the Neversink River.

7.30 Pass the flood plain of the East Branch of the Neversink River. At the crossing of Deer Shanty Brook, two new log bridges have been constructed where crossings at times of high water were formerly a problem.

7.45 Climb out of the flood plain and ascend gently.

7.60 Reach the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch Trail.* To continue, turn right and follow the yellow markers. To the left, it is 1.2 miles to the parking area at the end of Denning Road.

 

* This junction marks the eastern end of the Finger Lakes Trail, a hiking trail that continues west along the Southern Tier of New York to the Pennsylvania border at Allegheny State Park.

18. Denning Road to Wittenberg Mountain

Features: Slide, Cornell and Wittenberg Mountains
Distance: 8.40 miles
USGS Map Quads: Peekamoose Mountain, Phoenicia
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 143 (Southern Catskill Trails), and Trail Map 142 (Central Catskill Trails).

General Description

From the valley of the East Branch of the Neversink River, the Long Path follows the route of the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail. At the Curtis Monument, it turns onto the ridge of the Burroughs Range. Slide Mountain, the first encountered on the ridge, is the highest peak in the Catskills. The trail then passes over Cornell and Wittenberg Mountains. Since the Long Path in this section follows several DEC trails, the hiker should be careful at trail junctions to choose the correct trail.

Access

From New York City: Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Continue on NY Route 17 west to Exit 100 (Liberty). Turn right at the end of the exit ramp and follow NY Route 55 east for 10 miles to Curry. At a sign on the right for Claryville, turn left onto Sullivan County Route 19 (Claryville Road) and follow it for 13 miles to the trailhead at the end of the road. The name of the road changes to Denning Road upon reaching Claryville. After about 7.5 miles, the designation of the road as a county road ends, and the road narrows. To reach the beginning of this section of the Long Path, follow the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail northeast from the parking area for 1.2 miles.
From the Hudson Valley: Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 18 (New Paltz). Continue west on NY Route 299 through the Village of New Paltz. At the junction with US Route 44/55, go west (right). Follow Route 55 to Curry, and make a right onto Sullivan County Route 19. Continue as described above.

Parking

0.00 Parking area at end of Denning Road (1.2 miles along the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail from the beginning of this section) (41.96556°, -74.45248°).
8.40 Woodland Valley State Campground (parking fee charged in season) (42.03576°, -74.36531). It is 2.75 miles along the Wittenberg-Cornell-Slide Trail (also called Burroughs Range Trail) from the Long Path to the campground.

Camping

Several campsites in this section at 1.75 mi, 5.00 mi, and 5.25-5.50 mi.
8.40 Terrace Mountain Lean-to (1.05 miles from the Long Path on yellow-blazed Terrace Mountain Trail; no water), and Woodland Valley State Campground (fee charged), 2.75 miles from the Long Path.

Trail Description

0.00 From the intersection of the Peekamoose-Table Trail with the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail (it is 1.2 mi from Denning Road to this intersection) proceed north on the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch Trail (a woods road). The trail rises gently but steadily through hardwood forest, crossing a few small streams.

0.55 Pass a spring to the left of the trail.

0.85 Cross a stream on a wooden bridge. The trail runs along the shoulder of a steep slope, with the rushing water of Deer Shanty Brook below to the right.

1.75 Turn right onto the blue-blazed Curtis-Ormsbee Trail. The yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch Trail continues straight ahead, reaching Ulster County Route 47 in 1.5 miles. Near the junction is a DEC campsite, and a stone monument in memory of William ("Father Bill") Curtis and Allen Ormsbee, both of whom died in a snowstorm on Mt. Washington on June 30, 1900. The trail is named in their memory. The Curtis-Ormsbee Trail leads up the ridge of the Burroughs Range, which comes into view just before the trail junction. The ascent is sometimes steeply up rock ledges, and alternates between hardwood and spruce forest.

2.40 About 500 feet past the sign marking the 3,500-foot elevation, a short side trail leads right, to a ledge with a spectacular lookout. Table Mountain (with its long, flat top) and Rocky and Lone Mountains are clearly visible. The ascent continues, with level, swampy stretches and steep climbs.

3.40 Turn right onto the red-blazed Wittenberg-Cornell-Slide Trail. The trail ascends gently through dense spruce trees.

4.05 Reach the summit of Slide Mountain (marked by a concrete slab, a remnant of a former fire tower). At 4,180 feet in elevation, this is the highest point in the Catskill Mountains. In another 300 feet, an outcrop on the left side of the trail offers an excellent view to the east, with the Ashokan Reservoir visible below in the distance. The Burroughs Plaque, commemorating John Burroughs, is set into the side of this outcrop. The descent from Slide is steep and rugged, with wooden steps provided in the steepest section. Several good views are possible along the way.

4.30 A sign marks the way to a spring, a dependable source of water, on the left side of the trail. The pitch of the descent becomes more moderate, but several sharp rock faces must be traversed.

5.00 Reach the low spot between Slide and Cornell Mountains. An unmarked trail leads right, about 300 feet to a spring. This is a popular camping spot for those doing the Wittenberg-Cornell-Slide circular, but reports indicate it may be trashy. Beyond the col, the trail levels off and passes around a wet area. In the spring, the hobblebush puts on a spectacular show in this area. The trail begins to ascend Cornell Mountain, passing through a dense spruce-balsam forest. As the trail nears the summit of Cornell, it climbs steeply over a series of rock ledges.

5.25 There are at least 4 decent campsites in the next quarter mile.

6.25 Reach the top of a rock ledge. To the left of the trail is a rock outcropping with a spectacular view of the great Panther-Slide Wilderness Area, the largest unbroken landmass in the Catskills. Views of Slide Mountain and its slide are directly ahead. To the left, Peekamoose, Table, Lone and Rocky Mountains are visible. To the right of Slide are Giant Ledge and Panther Mountain, with the Devil's Path range in the far distance. From this viewpoint, there is no evidence of civilization in the Catskills.

6.45 To the right, a short yellow-blazed side trail leads to the summit of Cornell Mountain. The view from Cornell is somewhat overgrown, but there are good views eastward to the Ashokan Reservoir. From here, the trail begins to descend. 

6.55 The trail reaches the top of a rock ledge, with a view to the northwest toward Wittenberg Mountain. The trail scrambles down a very steep crevice in the rock ledge and onto the "Bruin's Causeway", the path along the ridge between Cornell and Wittenberg. This is one of the highest cols in the Catskills, with the elevation remaining over 3,500 feet.

wittenberg

18.1 View of Wittenberg. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

6.90 Reach the col between Cornell and Wittenberg Mountains. To the right, a faint old trail leads down extremely steeply to Moon Haw Road in Maltby Hollow. This trail should be avoided by all but the most experienced hikers. The Long Path now begins its climb to the summit of Wittenberg Mountain.

7.25 Reach the summit of Wittenberg Mountain, with a large open rock ledge that affords a tremendous view to the east. The Ashokan Reservoir is visible down below, with Ashokan High Point beyond. On a clear day, the Hudson River may be seen in the distance, with the Taconic Mountains at the Connecticut-Massachusetts border far beyond. To the north, the Devil's Path range is visible. The trail begins a steep descent over a series of rock ledges, continuing through the characteristic spruce-balsam summit forest.

8.15 The Long Path begins to level off and now follows a trail that was constructed by the CCC. It passes through a high elevation deciduous forest.

8.40 The Long Path reaches the end of this section, and turns right on a blue-blazed trail. This new 9-mile section opened in 2014 and is a continuation of the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail. The Wittenberg-Cornell-Slide Trail continues straight ahead and reaches the Woodland Valley campground in 2.75 miles. The Terrace Mountain lean-to is 1.05 miles ahead.


ashokan

18.2 The Ashokan Reservoir from Wittenberg Mountain. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

19. Wittenberg Mountain to Phoenicia

Feature: Scenic views from Cross Mountain, Mount Pleasant, and Romer Mountain.
Distance: 9.85 miles
USGS Map Quad: Phoenicia
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 143 (Southern Catskill Trails), Trail Map 142 (Central Catskill Trails), and Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

A major relocation of the Long Path was opened in June 2014.  The former roadwalk from Woodland Valley to Phoenicia has been replaced by a beautiful footpath constructed by volunteers. See http://www.nynjtc.org/sites/default/files/Catskills_LongPathRelocation-SlideMountainWilderness_TrailMap2014.pdf

The Long Path follows a new trail along the foot of Wittenberg Mountain and reaches a spectacular viewpoint before descending to Cross Mountain. It is a pleasant hike along Cross Mountain, which is nothing more than a long ridge connecting Wittenberg Mountain with Mount Pleasant. There are several good views of Wittenberg and the Ashokan Reservoir along the way. The trail then passes over Mount Pleasant, about a quarter mile west of the summit, with more nice views of Wittenberg Mountain and a view to the east. Following a series of switchbacks, the trail starts ascending Romer Mountain. From the summit of Romer Mountain, it is a three-mile descent before reaching the DEC parking area at the foot of Romer Mountain. The trail continues on local streets east along the Esopus Creek, and crosses the Esopus into the Village of Phoenicia.

Access

Take the New York StateThruway to Exit 19 (Kingston). Follow NY Route 28 west for 23 miles to Phoenicia. Turn right at the first turn to Phoenicia (Bridge Street). Follow Bridge Street to just before the railroad tracks, and turn left onto High Street. Follow High Street and then Woodland Valley Road 6 miles to the Woodland Valley State Campground. It is a 2.75-mile hike from the campground to the Long Path.

Parking

0.00 Woodland Valley State Campground (parking fee charged in season) (42.03576°, -74.36531°). It is 2.75 miles from the parking lot to the Long Path.
9.10 DEC parking area at Lane Street, Phoenicia. (42.07825°, -74.31913°).
9.85 Village of Phoenicia (parking available on Main Street or behind the Phoenicia Pharmacy on NY Route 214).

Camping

0.00 Woodland Valley State Campground (fee charged). It is 2.75 miles from the campground to the Long Path.
0.00 Terrace Mountain Lean-to (1.05 miles from the Long Path on yellow-blazed Terrace Mountain Trail; no water).
9.85 Black Bear Campground, 17 Bridge Street,
Phoenicia; Tel. 845-688-7405.

Trail Description

0.00 From the trail junction, the Long Path follows a section of the Phoenicia–East Branch Trail (constructed by volunteers and opened in June 2014) which is blazed with blue DEC markers. The trail passes through an area that is occasionally wet. In about half a mile, the trail crosses a small stream that often has water.

0.85 Another seasonal stream crossing.

1.15 The trail reaches a spectacular viewpoint on the cliffs. Wittenberg Mountain is rising in the back, Panther Mountain is visible, as are the entire northern Catskills, and from a cliff slightly below, the Ashokan Reservoir can be seen. The trail descends steeply after the viewpoint and in about 0.2 mile passes the Grand Staircase, a series of beautiful rock steps. Past the Grand Staircase, the trail reaches the col between Wittenberg and Cross Mountains. The next couple of miles are mostly ridge walking, with several viewpoints near the summit of Cross Mountain.

 

viewpoint

19.1 View of the Devils's Path. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE]


2.25 A short side trail (currently unmarked) leads to a good viewpoint. In a few hundred feet, when the trail makes a sharp left turn, there is another short side trail (unmarked) straight ahead through a field of ferns to a viewpoint.

2.35 View from the trail of the Ashokan Reservoir and Samuels Point.

2.40 Another side trail (unmarked) to the right leads to a viewpoint.

2.50 The Long Path reaches the summit of Cross Mountain. The trail starts slowly descending and passes over low cliffs and through several open areas where brambles and blueberries can be found. In about 3/4 mile the trail reaches the col between Cross Mountain and Mount Pleasant and passes through a relatively dark and cool forest, until the trail starts ascending again.

4.00 The trail reaches a fine viewpoint to the west, with Wittenberg and Panther Mountains in full view. The trail then veers to the east side of the ridge, passing a seasonal spring in about 0.1 mile.

4.40 A viewpoint to the east is reached. Below, the Route 28 corridor with the Emerson Resort is visible. The trail swings back to the west side of the ridge.

4.70 Another fine view to the west. Past this view, the trail follows the cliff line for a short while, than slowly descends to the col between Mount Pleasant and Romer Mountain. In the next mile, several switchbacks are passed, after which the trail starts to ascend.

5.75 The trail passes another unmarked side trail to a fine viewpoint to the east.

5.90 The trail reaches the summit of Romer Mountain.

6.70 The trail reaches a cliff, with a seasonal view to the west.

7.10 The trail passes through an interesting crevice and keeps descending, following on occasion stretches of old woods roads.

8.20 The trail crosses a wet area on rock slabs installed by one of the volunteer trail crews.

8.30 The trail turns left onto a woods road. To the right, the woods road leads to an old bluestone quarry.

8.55 The trail makes a sharp left turn. Straight ahead is a short side trail to a pipe spring.

9.10 The Long Path reaches a DEC parking lot at the end of Lane Street. The trail continues out of the parking lot on a local street (Lane Street) and turns left.

9.30 The Long Path turns right on High Street, which runs parallel to Esopus Creek. It crosses under NY Route 28 and intersects Bridge Street.

9.65 The Long Path turns left on Bridge Street, crosses the railroad tracks and then Esopus Creek, and enters Phoenicia. Black Bear Campground is off Bridge Street on the right. The railroad tracks, formerly the route of the Ulster and Delaware Railroad, which once brought trainloads of tourists to this portion of the Catskills. Today, Rail Explorers offers railbike rides from Mt. Pleasant to Phoenicia (www.railexplorers.com).

9.85 Reach Main Street in Phoenicia (Ulster County Route 40). To the left is the center of Phoenicia. While just two blocks long, it is well worth the detour. It is the home of several restaurants and a number of antique shops. There is also a grocery and general store for backpackers to resupply, as well as a B&B. To continue on the Long Path, turn right and proceed eastward on Main Street (Ulster County Route 40).

 

Phoenicia

19.2 Esopus Creek in Phoenicia. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

20. Phoenicia to Silver Hollow Notch

Feature: Tremper Mountain
Distance: 11.50 miles
USGS Map Quads: Phoenicia, Bearsville, Hunter
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

The Long Path leaves Phoenicia on public roads, paralleling the Esopus Creek. The trail then climbs up the south side of Tremper Mountain, following an old tote road to the former state fire tower. From there, it heads toward Carl Mountain and circles it to descend to Warner Creek before going over Edgewood Mountain to Silver Hollow Notch. This section begins a long stretch between supply points. From Phoenicia to Palenville is over 40 miles. In this distance, only two roads are crossed. Neither has stores within 4 miles of the crossings. There is an unbridged stream crossing at the 8.25 mile mark (Warner Creek) that is dangerous to impassible at high water.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 19 (Kingston). Follow NY Route 28 west for 23 miles to Phoenicia. Turn right at the second turn to Phoenicia (Bridge Street). Follow Bridge Street across the Esopus Creek to Main Street in Phoenicia.

Parking

0.00 Village of Phoenicia (parking available on Main Street or behind the Phoenicia Pharmacy on NY Route 214). (unlocated)
1.30 There is a DEC parking lot on Plank Road (Ulster County Route 40), 0.3 miles south of where the Long Path leaves the road. (42.06599°, -74.30312°)
11.50 There is parking about 1.2 miles from the end of this section, off NY Route 214 near Notch Inn Road. ( 42.14324°, -74.21215°)

Camping

3.15 Baldwin Memorial Lean-to.
4.00 Tremper Mountain Lean-to.

Trail Description

0.00 From the intersection of Bridge Street and Main Street in Phoenicia continue east on Main Street (Ulster County Route 40), following the north side of Esopus Creek. In the spring, the Esopus is filled with white water canoers and kayakers, as well as trout fishermen. The Esopus is one of the most famous trout streams in America. In the summer, the primary recreational use of the creek is by people who ride lazily downstream in inner tubes.

1.30 The Long Path arrives at the unmarked beginning of the old fire warden's road leading up Tremper Mountain on the left. This was the trailhead for the Phoenicia Trail before it was moved 0.3 miles east to a new parking lot in the late 90s. Turn left following the wide road steeply uphill for about 100 yards to a junction with the Phoenicia Trail. Red markers to the right lead 0.3 miles to the parking area on Ulster County Route 40. Continue straight ahead on red markers following the fire warden's road to the abandoned state fire tower. The grade varies between steep and gradual. On the steeper sections, the trail is rocky and eroded. For most of the way, the trail passes through a mixed hardwood and hemlock forest.

2.05 Pass rock ledges on the left.

2.15 Pass a seasonal spring on left, which is reliable in all but the driest times.

2.20 The trail passes an abandoned bluestone quarry on the left. Bluestone mining was once one of the primary industries in the Catskills. As you pass the quarry, you can see the layering that made bluestone an easy mineral to mine. Past the quarry the trail levels off, crosses several woods roads, and begins a series of switchbacks.

2.95 The trail sidehills through a steep slope with rock walls on the right and a steep drop on the left. After a short level stretch, the trail again begins a steep climb.

3.15 A side trail to the right leads to the Baldwin Memorial Lean-to. In another 250 feet, pass an undependable pipe spring 50 feet to the left of the trail.

3.65 After a switchback, the trail climbs to the top of the ridge, and then follows it the rest of the way to the summit. Here the forest is less mature; consequently, there is more undergrowth.

4.00 Pass the Tremper Mountain Lean-to on the left.

4.05 Reach the flat, level summit of Tremper Mountain, with an abandoned state fire tower, formerly used by fire observers with two-way radios. These towers were placed on top of selected mountains in the early 1900s after a series of fires devastated the mountains. More recently, the fire towers have been replaced by aircraft patrols. This fire tower has been restored and is open to the public. To the right of the tower is an open area that affords a view of the Devil's Path when the leaves are down. Continuing past the tower, the Long Path passes through a cleared area and then begins to descend, now following the blue-blazed Warner Creek Trail. It passes through a fairly open forest, with a base of blackberry rambles.

frost

20.1 Frost growing from the rocks. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

4.30 The trail enters a more mature forest, with little undergrowth. It continues to descend along the ridge top towards the col between Tremper Mountain and Carl Mountain. Initially, the trail follows the eastern slope of the ridge, with seasonal views through the trees over the Devil's Path to the north.

4.95 The trail levels out and then begins a gradual climb of the north peak of Tremper Mountain. For the most part, the trail stays about 200 vertical feet below the top of the ridge, following the western slopes.

5.80 After passing through a hemlock grove, the trail descends along the eastern side of the ridge.

6.20 Reach the col between Tremper Mountain and Carl Mountain. Here, the yellow-marked Willow Trail turns right, leaving the ridge, descending steeply 1.6 miles through Hoyt Hollow to Jessop Road, and in another mile to the Willow Post Office. Continue ahead on the blue-marked Warner Creek Trail following an old, gently sloping woods road with little elevation change.

6.60 Bear left leaving the woods road and begin a moderate descent through open hardwoods. When the leaves are down, there are views to Tremper Mountain and the Central Catskills beyond.

7.00 The trail eases onto a wide bench and contours to the right around Carl Mountain, slowly gaining elevation.

7.35 Begin a steep descent to Warner Creek, passing a series of cataracts in the seasonal stream to the right of the trail. There are many switchbacks on the way down.

bluestone-quarry

20.2 Bluestone quarry. 2011 [JAKOB FRANKE]

7.60 The trail descends some stone steps into the bed of a seasonal stream. Continue across the streambed to meet the terminus of an old quarry road and follow it. In about 0.2 miles, there is a bluestone quarry on the right. Once past the quarry, the trail descends again for a few hundred feet.

7.90 Pass a stone foundation to right. It is in open park-like surroundings and is a perfect area for a campsite. Continue gently downhill towards Warner Creek.

8.25 The trail crosses Warner Creek on a gravel bar in a hemlock grove. There is no bridge for this crossing, making it dangerous at medium or high water.

warner-creek

20.3 Warner Creek. 2009 [JAKOB FRANKE]


8.30 Reach a woods road and turn right to follow it. There is a small stream within 500 feet located in a hemlock grove.

8.60 Turn left, leaving the woods road, and begin the climb to the summit of Edgewood Mountain. The ascent is moderate to steep through open hardwoods and an occasional hemlock grove.

9.25 Pass a black birch tree with a large burl in its trunk. Just beyond, the trail joins a faint old quarry road and steepens.

9.55 The trail reaches the broad ridge and turns right to follow it uphill.

10.00 The trail traverses a grassy area.

10.50 Pass a large bog on right.

10.70 The trail crosses the broad summit of Edgewood Mountain. There are no views. Shortly beyond, begin a steep descent through rocky ledges toward Silver Hollow Notch.

11.00 Reach a view into Warner Creek Valley with Olderbark Mountain opposite.

11.20 Reach a view to the south over Warner Creek Valley.

11.50 Arrive at Silver Hollow Notch and the end of Section 20. To continue, cross the road and follow the blue blazes. Turning to the left leads in about a mile to Notch Inn Road and NY Route 214.

Central Catskills

Once out of the southern parts of the Catskills, the Long Path enters the more well traveled and civilized regions. The trail joins the Devil's Path, one of the most strenuous hiking trails in New York, and passes near the former sites of two large hotels. Both hotels played a huge role in the development and then subsequent protection of the Catskills as an area "forever wild" to be spared from logging and other encroachments of civilization on nature. North Lake State Campground now occupies the land owned by both hotels in order to preserve the landmarks and vistas seen by the rich and famous when the Catskills were "the" place to go to for travel and vacation. The trail also passes a bounty of waterfalls, some directly on the trail and some nearby. Kaaterskill Falls, a short distance from North Lake State Campground, has two major drops, each a major waterfall in its own right, that add up to the tallest falls in New York State.

 

porcupine

Porcupine. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

21. Silver Hollow Notch to Platte Clove Road

Features: Devil's Path (Plateau, Sugarloaf, Twin, and Indian Head Mountains).
Distance: 13.00 miles
USGS Map Quads: Hunter, Bearsville, Woodstock, Kaaterskill
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

This section of the Long Path contains some of the most spectacular and rugged scenery in the Catskills. From Silver Hollow Notch the trail ascends a shoulder of Plateau Mt. Passing several viewpoints before reaching the Devil's Path on the ridge of Plateau Mt. From here it follows the Devil's Path east over Plateau's summit, Sugarloaf, Twin and Indian Head Mountains. This trail ascends and descends in dramatic fashion, clambering over and through large rock ledges. Each mountain offers excellent views. The Devil's Path is the most dramatic trail in the Catskills, going up and over six major peaks. The Long Path traverses the four eastern peaks. As its name implies, there are tremendous drop-offs between the peaks. The hike of the entire Devil's Path (west to east) involves a gain of over 8,000 feet in total elevation, an elevation gain comparable to that of the Great Range in the Adirondacks!

Access

The southern end, Silver Hollow Notch, is not accessible by car. It can be reached on foot from NY Route 214 by walking up the abandoned Silver Hollow Notch Road (now called Notch Inn Road) from Edgewood. To reach Notch Inn Road, take Exit 19 of the New York State Thruway. Follow NY Route 28 west to Phoenicia and then north on NY Route 214 to Edgewood.

Parking

0.00 Parking area is 1.2 miles from the trail, on the west side of Route 214, 0.3 miles north of Notch Inn Road. (42.14324°, -74.21215°). Walk to Notch Inn Road, then 0.9 miles up mostly abandoned and severely eroded old road to Silver Hollow Notch.
13.00 Steenberg Road. (42.13387°, -74.08194°)

Camping

5.13 Mink Hollow Lean-to
11.83 Devil's Kitchen Lean-to

Trail Description

0.00 Silver Hollow Notch (2,340') - The trail crosses the old woods road (Silver Hollow Notch Road) following blue markers across a flat stretch joining a faint woods road and ascending.

0.45 Turn hard left at switchback. Yellow trail leads 75 yards right to a view over the Warners Creek Valley and the slopes of Edgewood Mt.

0.64 After scrambling over some boulders and up a ledge, view from top of ledge south to Belleayre Mt. and beyond.

0.91 Trail turns hard left where yellow side trail branches right to a grassy view towards Olderbark Mt. across Warners Creek Valley. Grade eases shortly beyond this side trail before beginning a pleasant walk thru the thick spruce fir high elevation forest across Daley Ridge.

1.71 Pass the bearly noticeable summit (3,440') of Daley Ridge and begin descent.

2.22 Low point, begin ascent of Plateau Mt.  

rocks

21.1 Rocks on Plateau Mountain. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

2.42 First of two extensive views from top of headwall overlooking Warners Creek Valley and Olderbark Mt.

2.65 Yellow trail to right leads 100 yards to spring.

2.69 After a short scramble a yellow marked side trail leads 10 yards to a sweeping view south over Daley Ridge and Stony Clove Valley.

2.74 Pass thru an open fern field.

2.93 Junction with red marked Devil's Path. Turn right. Unmarked trail opposite is a private trail, keep out. The next mile is a pleasant walk along the more or less flat summit ridge of Plateau thru a majestic old growth spruce fir forest.

3.43 Cross the summit of Plateau Mt. In dense spruce woods.

3.93 View east, trail begins the steep descent into Mink Hollow. Sugarloaf looms across the Notch.

4.73 Spring right of trail.

5.13 Junction with the southern leg of the Mink Hollow Trail - continue ahead on red markers. Mink Hollow Lean-to is located 200 feet to the right. Also to the right, the blue marked Mink Hollow Trail leads 3 miles to the end of Mink Hollow Road. It is another 3 miles south to Lake Hill on NY Route 212.

5.33 Junction with the northern leg of the Mink Hollow Trail. Left on blue markers leads 2.25 miles to a junction with the Pecoy Notch Trail and 0.25 miles further, Roaring Brook parking area. Continue ahead on red markers soon reaching the first of 5 rock ledges the trail climbs over ascending Sugarloaf.

5.68 The forest becomes primarily balsam fir and red spruce, with birch mixed in as the grade begins to moderate.

5.88 Pass the sign indicating the 3,500 foot elevation line. The forest now becomes more open with views to the left of the Blackhead Range to the north. The trail passes a large rock on the right with excellent views of Plateau Mt. across Mink Hollow.

6.08 A yellow marked side trail leads right to a rock ledge with an outstanding view of the southern Catskills. Visible are the Burroughs Range, Giant Ledge and Panther Mountain and mountains along the Pine Hill - West Branch Trail. Ashokan Reservoir can also be seen with the Shawangunks in the background. On a clear day, you can see all the way to the Hudson River Valley.

6.13 Reach the flat, level summit of Sugarloaf Mountain. The trail continues through a mature balsam-spruce forest, beginning to descend in a series of steps, alternating with level sections.

6.73 Reach a viewpoint to the east over Pecoy Notch, with Twin and Overlook Mountains visible beyond and the Ashokan Reservoir and Shawangunks in the distance to the right. The trail now begins a very steep descent into Pecoy Notch.

sugarloaf

21.2 View from Sugarloaf Mountain. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

6.88 Descend steeply over a series of rock ledges. There are many good views over Pecoy Notch to Twin Mountain beyond.

7.33 Descent ends abruptly shortly before reaching a junction with the Pecoy Notch Trail in the col between Sugarloaf and Twin Mountains. Left on blue markers leads 1.75 miles to the north end of the Mink Hollow Trail and a quarter mile beyond, Roaring Kill Road. The Long Path continues, beginning a steep climb of the west summit of Twin Mountain and climbing over large rocks and several rock ledges in the process. There are several good views back towards Sugarloaf during the ascent.

7.53 Pass a huge rock on the left that separated from the main ledge.

7.68 The trail goes thru a narrow passage and climbs up a rock ledge.

7.88 Reach a rock ledge with a large overhanging rock, a good temporary shelter, on the left. The trail continues through a cleft in the rock ledge. At the top of the ledge, there is a good viewpoint of Sugarloaf Mountain with the fire tower on Hunter visible to the west, and the Blackhead Range, Stoppel Point and Roundtop visible to the north. The grade now moderates.

8.03 The trail turns left and climbs a small ledge to reach a viewpoint near the west or true summit of Twin Mountain. From this vantage point, one can see to the south, the Ashokan Reservoir and the Shawangunk Mountains to the southeast, with the Hudson Valley and the Hudson Highlands far in the distance. The actual summit of Twin is slightly beyond this viewpoint. The trail now descends thru a mature spruce-fir forest.

8.33 Reach the col between the two peaks of Twin. The trail now ascends gradually to the east peak of Twin.

8.68 Reach the east peak of Twin Mountain with an excellent 180 degree view. To the west, Sugarloaf and Plateau Mountains are visible, and to the south all the major peaks of the southern Catskills may be seen. On a very clear day, High Point, NJ with it's tall monument can be spotted. To the southeast, the Ashokan Reservoir and Shawangunks are visible with the Hudson Highlands and Hudson Valley in the distance. Overlook Mountain with it's firetower may be seen to the east, with the Hudson River and the Taconics in the far distance. This is one of the best views in the Catskills. The Catskill 3500 Club does not consider the east peak of Twin, while over 3,500 feet high, as a separate peak, since the drop between the west and east peaks of Twin is less then the required 200 feet. The trail continues eastward, beginning to descend.

8.78 Reach a viewpoint to the east over Jimmy Dolan Notch. The trail now begins to descend more steeply.

8.93 Descend over rock ledge and pass under a large balanced rock to the left.

9.08 The trail reaches Jimmy Dolan Notch, the col between Twin and Indian Head Mountains. This notch has the highest elevation (3,100') of all the col's along the Devil's Path. Here the blue marked Jimmy Dolan Notch Trail descends steeply at first then moderately north two miles to Prediger Road. Continue ahead following red markers to begin a moderate to steep ascent up Indian Head.

bluestone-quarry

            21.3 Bluestone Quarry on Indian Head Mountain. 2001  [HERB CHONG]

9.63 The ascent becomes more gentle as the trail reaches thick spruce woods after a steep scramble up the final ledge to the summit of Indian Head Mountain. This is the highest of the three summits making up the summit ridge.

10.08 Reach a spectacular overlook after going over the second summit. Below is the eastern summit with Plattekill Mountain beyond and Overlook Mountain to the right. Belopw and to the left is Platte Clove with Huckleberry Point prominent above the north side of the Clove. On the far horizon is Vermont to the north, Massachusetts to the northeast and Connecticut to the southeast. In between is the Hudson Valley from just south of Albany to the Highlands beyond Newburgh. A short but very steep descent brings one to the low point between the middle and east summits.

10.58 View to north with Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top across the upper Schoharie Valley with the eastern Escarpment mountains and Black Dome Range beyond. Begin a steep to moderate descent.

overlook

21.4 View from Overlook Mountain. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

11.83 The Devil's Path meets the blue marked Overlook Trail coming in from the right on a wide woods road. Turn left on the road, continuing to follow red markers. Right on the Overlook Trail leads 0.15 miles to Devil's Kitchen Lean-to.

11.88 Reach another trail junction. The Long Path continues ahead on the old road now following blue markers while the Devil's Path turns left. There is a large bluestone quarry to the right.

12.13 Cross onto the Platte Clove Preserve. The blue markers now change to green diamonds Preserve markers. Camping is not permitted within the Preserve which runs from here to beyond Platte Clove Road.

12.83 Cross Plattekill Creek on bridge at head of Platte Clove. Continue steeply uphill to Platte Clove Road. Turn right following paved Platte Clove Road east.

12.98 Reach Steenberg Road and the state snowmobile trail on the left. This is the end of Section 21. A large parking area is located 250 feet north on Steenberg Road from this intersection. To continue on the Long Path, turn left on Steenberg Road.

waterfall

21.5 Waterfall at Platte Clove Preserve. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

22. Platte Clove Road to Palenville

Features: Buttermilk and Wildcat Falls
Distance: 9.80 miles
USGS Map Quads: Kaaterskill
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

The first part of this section runs along a DEC snowmobile trail that ascends the northern slopes of Kaaterskill High Peak on rather gentle grades. After leaving the snowmobile trail, the Long Path descends gradually at first and then steeply to the old Red Gravel Hill Road, which it follows the rest of the way. For the next two miles it is level, passing a series of dramatic waterfalls with a spectacular view into Kaaterskill Clove. After a brief ascent, it descends continuously into Palenville, passing a number of abandoned bluestone quarries. For most of this section, blue DEC trail markers mark the Long Path. The last part of the section, which crosses private property, is marked by aqua paint blazes.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 20 (Saugerties). Continue on NY Route 212 west to the small town of Centerville. As Route 212 curves to the left, bear right onto Ulster County Route 35 and stay on it for the next 1.6 miles. Shortly after passing the Blue Mountain Campground, Route 35 makes a sharp left turn. Turn left here, but afterwards continue straight ahead on Ulster County Route 33, as Route 35 turns right. In about two miles, the road (now known as Platte Clove Road or Greene County Route 16) turns into a dramatic mountain road that climbs over 1,000 feet in less than three miles. At the top of the climb, four miles after leaving Route 35, the road crosses a small brook; the trailhead is immediately beyond the brook on the right at the intersection with Steenberg Road.

Winter Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 20 (Saugerties). Take NY Route 32 north to NY Route 32A. Continue on Route 32A north to Palenville. Turn left (west) onto Route 23A, and follow it through Kaaterskill Clove and past Haines Falls to Tannersville. In Tannersville, turn left at the traffic light and continue along Greene County Route 16 (known for most of the way as Platte Clove Road) to the top of Platte Clove. The trailhead is on the left at the intersection with Steenberg Road.

Parking

0.00 On Steenberg Road about 250 feet north of the trailhead. (42.13387°, -74.08194°)
9.80 DEC parking area on Route 23A. ( 42.17620°, -74.03041°)

Trail Description

0.00 From Platte Clove Road take the snowmobile trail to the north, following a gravel road (Steenberg Road) uphill. The snowmobile trail is blazed with large orange or yellow DEC plastic snowmobile markers in addition to blue DEC markers for the Long Path.

0.70 Turn right onto another dirt road.

0.95 Turn right, leaving Steenberg Road, and follow another old woods road northward.

1.05 To the right, an unofficial trail, with yellow markers, leads to Huckleberry Point, an excellent viewpoint. The Long Path continues straight ahead on nearly level grades.

1.35 Cross bridges over a pair of streams in a swampy area. After the second bridge, the ascent resumes, as the trail climbs to the 3,000-foot elevation on the north flank of Kaaterskill High Peak.

2.25 Reach the highest point on the trail in this section in an area known as the "Pine Plains." The trail continues through nearly level, though swampy, terrain. For the next 0.75 miles, the forest is typical of that found at higher elevations, with considerable spruce, hemlock and birch.

3.50 The snowmobile trail turns left, uphill, while the Long Path, blazed with blue DEC markers, continues straight ahead. To climb Kaaterskill High Peak, turn left with the snowmobile trail, turn right in 0.1 miles onto the snowmobile loop trail, and then turn left onto an unofficial blue-blazed trail that leads to the summit of High Peak. The Long Path now goes through drier terrain.

3.70 The Long Path turns right (north) onto an old trail that formerly ran from the private community of Twilight Park to High Peak, and begins to descend off the ridge. The descent is often steep and contains many small switchbacks.

4.15 Leave the old Twilight Park Trail and begin to descend over a series of sharp slopes and narrow flat ledges.

4.80 The trail reaches another narrow ledge, turns right on the old Red Gravel Hill Road, and begins to run parallel to the edge of the great drop to Kaaterskill Clove on the left.

5.00 Reach Buttermilk Falls just to the left of the trail, a spectacular two-step waterfall. Cross the stream and continue along a level ledge.

5.50 Reach Wildcat Falls, another spectacular waterfall. The ledge to the west of the falls affords an excellent view of Kaaterskill Clove and the Hudson Valley to the east. Cross the stream and continue along the level trail. You will descend a small ledge to the left, pass a large boulder, and bear right along the slope edge again.

6.00 Cross the two streams of Hillyer Ravine, which provide the last sure source of water in this section. The trail now ascends slightly and crosses several intermittent streams.

6.80 A yellow side trail on the left leads in half a mile to Poets Ledge, a popular hiking destination.

6.95 Reach the crest of the rise and begin to descend. The trail continues downhill, at times steeply, until reaching Malden Avenue. The trail uses several long switchbacks in its descent, and an old bluestone quarry is passed to the right of the trail.

8.50 Cross the state land boundary. The Long Path now runs over private property and the trail markers change to a mixture of aqua paint blazes and blue DEC plastic markers.

8.90 Reach Malden Avenue in Palenville and turn left along the road. Pass the Fernwood Inn on the left.

9.05 The road is closed to vehicular traffic.

9.40 After going around another barricade, which blocks vehicular traffic, turn right onto NY Route 23A.

9.80 The section ends at a DEC parking area on the left, just east of an "Entering Catskill Park" sign. To continue, turn left into the parking area and continue on an old road.

 

buttermild-falls

22.1 Buttermilk Falls during the dry season. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

23. Palenville to North Lake State Campground

Features: Kaaterskill Clove and North Lake
Distance: 4.80 miles
USGS Map Quads: Kaaterskill
Trail Conference Maps: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

For most of this section, the Long Path follows the Sleepy Hollow Horse Trail, the route of the old Harding Road that led from Palenville to the Hotel Kaaterskill. There are a number of views along this route, which is blazed with the yellow markers of the horse trail. The Kaaterskill Clove Lookout provides a dramatic open view of the Clove, and there are continuous views of the Clove through the trees when the leaves are down. Upon reaching the Escarpment, the Long Path follows the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, passing the sites of the two most famous nineteenth century hotels in the Catskills, the Hotel Kaaterskill and the Catskill Mountain House. Along the way, there are several spectacular views of Kaaterskill Clove and the Hudson Valley. The section ends at North Lake, once used for recreation by guests of the Catskill Mountain House. Today, it is the site of a large state campground, complete with a beach and a boat rental facility.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 20 (Saugerties). Take NY Route 32 north to NY Route 32A. Continue on Route 32A north to Palenville. Turn left (west) onto NY Route 23A, and pass through the Village of Palenville. The section begins a short distance beyond the village, about 100 feet east of an "Entering Catskill Park" sign, where the Long Path enters the woods on the Sleepy Hollow Horse Trail.

Parking

0.00 On NY Route 23A, about 0.4 miles west of the "Entering Catskill Park" sign, there is a small parking area on the north side of the road, just before the bridge over Kaaterskill Creek. (42.17693°, -74.03655°)
4.80 North Lake State Campground, at North Lake Beach (parking fee charged in season). (42.19802°, -74.03501°)

Camping

4.80 North Lake State Campground (fee charged).

Trail Description

0.00 From Route 23A, about 100 feet east of the "Entering Catskill Park" sign, the Long Path proceeds north, following the red markers, the route of the old Harding Road from Palenville to the Hotel Kaaterskill. Shortly after leaving Route 23A, the trail switchbacks to the left and begins a long climb up Kaaterskill Clove. The trail parallels the clove most of the way, climbing 1,400 feet in three miles.

0.25 A woods road goes off to the right. The Long Path continues ahead on old Harding Road.

0.95 Reach a trail register. Here the trail turns right and follows a deep side gorge formed by a stream. Just past the register, the trail reaches Kaaterskill Clove Lookout, which affords a spectacular view to the left into Kaaterskill Clove. Kaaterskill High Peak towers over the clove on the south side. On the right side of the trail, there is a stone fireplace below a small rock ledge. This is a great place for a picnic. Beyond the viewpoint, the trail continues to parallel the gorge, now often lined with hemlock trees.

kaaterskill-falls

23.1 Kaaterskill Falls. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

1.20 The trail reaches the head of the gorge and turns left to cross the stream that formed the gorge. There is a small waterfall here. The trail continues uphill, once again paralleling the clove. When the leaves are down, there are continuous views through the trees of Kaaterskill Clove and Kaaterskill High Peak.

1.90 The trail makes a switchback to the right and begins to move away from Kaaterskill Clove. The Long Path now parallels the Escarpment Trail, which runs to the north, about 300 feet above the level of the Long Path. Again, there are views of Kaaterskill Clove through the trees, now with the Hudson River valley beyond.

2.45 Reach a viewpoint to the east, down Kaaterskill Clove, with the Hudson Valley, the Hudson River and the Taconics visible beyond.

2.65 The Long Path turns left, following the red markers, as a horse trail goes off to the right to the Palenville Lookout and Rip Van Winkle Hollow.

2.85 Turn right onto the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail. To the left, the Escarpment Trail leads to Inspiration Point and the Layman Monument.

3.25 Reach the top of South Mountain. This was the site of the famous Hotel Kaaterskill, built in 1881 by George Harding, an influential guest at the Catskill Mountain House. He had become upset when the Mountain House refused to accommodate the special dietary needs of his daughter. As a result, he left and built his own hotel. That building was destroyed in a fire in 1924. The Long Path turns right, continuing along the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, as the red-blazed Schutt Road Trail goes off to the left. The Long Path now follows a wide and level trail.

3.85 A red-blazed trail continues straight ahead and provides a shortcut to the Catskill Mountain House, as the Long Path turns right, following the blue blazed Escarpment Trail, which begins to descend.

4.05 Reach Split Rock and Boulder Rock, which afford a fine view of Kaaterskill Clove and the Hudson Valley. Boulder Rock, a large glacier erratic that is perched atop the ledge, makes a fine scramble for those who enjoy bouldering.

4.15 The red-blazed shortcut trail rejoins from the left as the Long Path, still following the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, and continues north along the ledges. The trail passes an area known as "Puddingstone Hall", named for the conglomerate rock in the area, and descends to the Catskill Mountain House site.

4.55 Reach the site of the former Catskill Mountain House. Built in 1824, it was the earliest and most famous of the old Catskill hotels, and was frequented by Presidents and famous artists. Just east of the hotel site, an inclined railway brought guests up from the Hudson Valley. The Mountain House fell into disrepair in the early twentieth century, when travelers chose the American West and Europe, rather than the Catskills, as the destinations for their summer vacations. It was burned in 1963 by the DEC, since it had become a hazard. The area around the hotel is well-worth exploring. From the hotel site, the trail continues along a former hotel access road towards North Lake and then turns right, along the Escarpment, and follows a chain-link fence.

4.80 The trail passes through a picnic area, where a short side trail leads left to the North Lake parking lot. To continue, proceed straight ahead on the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail.

 

24. North Lake State Campground to Batavia Kill

Features: Catskill Escarpment, Blackhead Mountain
Distance: 9.80 miles
USGS Map Quads: Kaaterskill, Freehold
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

This section of the Long Path offers dramatic scenery. From North Lake, the trail proceeds north along the Catskill Escarpment (also known as the "Great Wall of Manitou"), with many spectacular views of the Hudson River valley over 2,000 feet below. Thomas Cole of the Hudson River school of painting made this area famous. After a steep climb to North Point, the trail becomes more rugged, descending from Stoppel Point to Dutcher Notch and then climbing Blackhead Mountain. The summit of Blackhead is the second highest point on the Long Path. North of Blackhead, the trail descends to the Batavia Kill Trail along one of the steepest trail sections in the Catskills. For the entire length of this section, the Long Path follows the Escarpment Trail, blazed with blue DEC trail markers.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 20 (Saugerties). Take NY Route 32 north to NY Route 32A. Continue on Route 32A north to Palenville. Turn left (west) onto NY Route 23A, and continue through Kaaterskill Clove to Haines Falls. In Haines Falls, turn right onto Greene County Route 18 and follow the signs to North Lake State Campground 3 miles ahead. Pass through the gate (a fee is charged in season) and continue ahead to the parking area at North Lake.

Parking

0.00 North Lake State Campground, at North Lake Beach (parking fee charged in season). (42.19802°, -74.03501°)
9.80 Parking area at end of Big Hollow Road. This is 1.4 miles along the red-blazed Black Dome Range Trail and the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail from the beginning of this section. (42.28932°, -74.11610°)

Camping

0.00 North Lake State Campground (fee charged).
9.80 Batavia Kill Lean-to (0.25 miles from the Long Path along the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail). Camping is prohibited between North Lake and North Point.

Trail Description

0.00 From the end of a short side trail that begins at the east end of the parking lot, the Long Path proceeds north along the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, passing through a picnic area. The trail passes a register box and begins to ascend.

0.30 After a short, steep climb over a rock ledge, the trail reaches Artist Rock, which provides a good view of the Hudson River valley. Artist Rock was made famous by Thomas Cole, the founder of the Hudson River school of painting. Beyond Artist Rock, the trail climbs a series of small ledges and passes through an area of hemlock, white pine, pitch pine, red spruce and balsam fir. The trail passes a large rock ledge on the right. This was the site of "Jacob's Ladder," which allowed Catskill Mountain House visitors to climb up to Sunset Rock above.

0.80 To the right, a yellow-blazed side trail leads to the top of Sunset Rock, which offers a dramatic view of North and South Lakes and the site of the Catskill Mountain House, with Kaaterskill High Peak visible directly behind the lakes. This was the site of one of Thomas Cole's most famous paintings.

1.00 Reach Newman's Ledge, a large overhanging rock outcropping with a spectacular view north over the Hudson River valley. On a clear day, the tall buildings of Albany are visible in the distance, with the Taconics and Green Mountains of Vermont beyond. The trail now climbs about 140 feet and emerges in an open area, with an interesting mountaintop swamp that is well worth exploring.

1.55 The yellow-blazed Rock Shelter Trail leaves to the left. This trail drops into Mary's Glen and continues to the gatehouse at the entrance to the North Lake area. From Mary's Glen, the red-blazed Mary's Glen Trail can be followed back to North Lake. The Rock Shelter Trail is named for a large overhang known as Badman's Cave, which was reputed to be a hideout for outlaws in the 1700s. The Long Path continues to the right and climbs through a rocky area in a spruce-balsam forest.

2.20 The red-blazed Mary's Glen Trail leaves to the left. This trail descends through a beautiful wooded area and provides an alternate return route to North Lake. The Long Path continues ahead and begins a very steep ascent to North Point.

2.35 Reach North Point, an open rocky ledge, which provides a spectacular 360-degree view. To the south, directly below, are North and South Lakes, with Kaaterskill High Peak and Roundtop in the background. To the east is the ridge of the Escarpment that we have been following, with the Hudson
Valley precipitously below. To the west and immediately ahead is North Mountain, with Blackhead Mountain behind to the right (northwest). The City of Albany is visible in the distance to the northeast. From here the trail continues to climb North Mountain.

2.80 Reach the summit of North Mountain. While only slightly over 3,000 feet high, North Mountain has a spruce-balsam forest that is characteristic of the higher elevations. The trail continues up, at times steeply, through brushy, rocky areas.

4.05 Reach Stoppel Point, which provides a view northeast over the Hudson Valley, with Albany and the Taconics in the distance. Stoppel Point was the site of a recent plane crash, and parts of the wreckage may still be seen. From Stoppel Point, the trail begins to descend towards Dutcher Notch, with occasional views of the Blackhead Range through the trees, and then levels off.

5.15 The trail curves to the north and resumes its descent. Just before the descent, there is an excellent view back to the southeast. From here, it is evident that one has already descended a substantial distance from Stoppel Point. After a short, steep descent, the trail levels off again.

6.30 After another short, steep descent, the trail reaches Dutcher Notch, the lowest point on the Escarpment Trail since just beyond North Lake. To the right, the yellow-blazed Dutcher Notch Trail drops 1,700 feet in 2.4 miles to Floyd Hawver Road. There is a reliable spring on the Dutcher Notch Trail at 0.35 miles and about 500 vertical feet below this point, the only reliable water in this section. To the left, the yellow-blazed Colgate Lake Trail descends to Colgate Lake, first passing around an unnamed lake and skirting private Lake Capra. The Long Path continues straight ahead, beginning a steep ascent to a level area sometimes known as Arizona Plateau.

Escarpment-Trail

24.1 Ledge on the Escarpment Trail. 2001 [ED WALSH]

7.15 After an 800-foot climb, the trail reaches the Arizona plateau and begins to level off. To the left, a short side trail leads to a viewpoint back towards Stoppel Point and Lakes Capra and Colgate. The trail follows this level plateau for about a mile, with increasingly spectacular views of Blackhead Mountain straight ahead.

8.30 The trail begins its final 600-foot ascent to the summit of Blackhead Mountain. Near the summit, there is a spectacular view to the east over the Escarpment below, with Albany and the Taconics visible to the north.

8.80 Reach the summit of Blackhead Mountain, the second highest point on the Long Path and the fourth highest mountain in the Catskills. The view from the summit is overgrown, but views to the south are possible by heading into the scrub vegetation just left of the trail. Here, the Long Path, following the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, turns right, as the yellow-blazed Blackhead Mountain Trail goes straight ahead and descends to Lockwood Gap between Blackhead and Black Dome Mountains. (It is worth the 0.2-miles detour down this trail to a spectacular view to the south and west). The Long Path drops precipitously down the north face of Blackhead, plunging over ledges in one of the steepest descents in the Catskills. Near the base of the descent, there are two fine views of the Hudson Valley to the east.

9.80 Reach the base of the descent from Blackhead Mountain. Here, the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail descends to the left, passing the Batavia Kill Leanto in 0.25 miles, and ending at the red-blazed Black Dome Range Trail in 0.9 miles. From this point, the Black Dome Range Trail continues straight ahead to the parking area at the end of Big Hollow Road in another 0.5 miles. To continue on the Long Path, proceed straight ahead on the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail.

Escarpment-trail-2012

24.2 Along the Escarpment Trail in the fall. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

25. Batavia Kill to NY Route 23

Features: Northern Catskill Escarpment, Windham High Peak
Distance: 8.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Freehold, Hensonville
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

The Long Path continues along the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail to NY Route 23 in East Windham. The trail crosses several 3,000-foot peaks before making the final climb over Windham High Peak. There are many views along the way over the Blackhead Range to the south and the Catskill and Mohawk valleys to the north. On a clear day, one can see all the way to the southern Adirondacks. From Windham High Peak, the trail descends to NY Route 23, at the northern edge of the Catskill Park, passing through two groves of Norway spruce planted by the CCC in the 1930s. For the entire length of this section, the Long Path follows the Escarpment Trail, blazed with blue DEC trail markers.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue on Route 23 west about 22 miles to Brooksburg. At a sign for Hensonville, turn left and proceed south on Greene County Route 65. In Hensonville, turn left onto Greene County Route 40 and follow it to Maplecrest. In Maplecrest, bear left onto Big Hollow Road, passing the Sugar Maples Resort, and continue about 5 miles to a parking area at the end of the road. To reach the beginning of this section of the Long Path, follow the red-blazed Black Dome Range Trail straight ahead for 0.5 miles to the intersection with the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail. Continue ahead on the Batavia Kill Trail 0.9 miles to the Escarpment Trail.

Parking

0.00 Parking area at end of Big Hollow Road. (42.28932°, -74.11602°) From here it is 1.4 miles along the red-blazed Black Dome Range Trail and the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail to the beginning of this section.
8.55 Parking area on Route 23 in East Windham, at intersection with Cross Road. (42.31280°, -74.19024°)

Camping

0.00 Batavia Kill Lean-to at 0.25 miles from the Long Path along the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail.
7.45 Elm Ridge Lean-to.

Trail Description

0.00 From the intersection of the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail with the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill trail, the Long Path proceeds north along the Escarpment Trail, ascending an unnamed knob with a fine viewpoint over the Hudson Valley. Although the trail runs close to the edge of the Escarpment, there are no other views on this section of the trail. The trail begins a gradual climb up to Acra Point.

1.80 Reach the open rock summit of Acra Point. The view here is somewhat obscured by low growth and is confined to the north. However, a short distance down the trail there is an open view to the west towards Big Hollow, with the Blackhead Range towering behind. As the trail begins to descend, a short side trail to the left leads to an open rock with another view toward Big Hollow and the Blackhead Range. There is also a view northwest along the ridge towards Burnt Knob and Windham High Peak. A little further down the trail there is a view to the north. The trail continues to descend to the col between Acra Point and Burnt Knob.

 

view of blackhead range

25.1 View of the Blackhead Range from Acra Point. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

2.50 The trail reaches the col. Here, the red-blazed Black Dome Range Trail descends to the left to Big Hollow Road. Water is available from a stream 0.7 miles down this trail. The Long Path continues ahead to the west, beginning a steep climb up Burnt Knob.

2.80 At the top of the climb, the trail curves to the left and reaches the southern side of Burnt Knob, where a short yellow-blazed side trail to the left leads to a beautiful viewpoint over Big Hollow and the Blackhead Range.

3.45 After descending from Burnt Knob, the trail passes by a viewpoint to the north.

3.80 The trail reaches the summit of another unnamed knob, where a short side trail to the left leads to a viewpoint to the southwest over Big Hollow.

3.95 After descending from the knob, the trail begins its ascent of Windham High Peak.

4.35 The trail passes through an open area, with views of Windham High Peak directly ahead, and begins to ascend steadily.

5.05 The Trail reaches the summit of Windham High Peak. Just before the summit, there is a large rock outcropping to the right, with an open view to the north. Sometimes called the "Great Northern Viewpoint", this is the last spectacular view from the Escarpment Trail. To the north, the lesser peaks of Ginseng, Hayden, Pisgah and Huntersfield, followed by the Long Path to the north, are visible. In the far distance, the Helderbergs and the southern Adirondacks may be seen on a clear day. The Hudson River valley is visible to the northeast, and on a clear day, the City of Albany, the Taconics and the Green Mountains of Vermont may also be seen. The trail bears left and continues along the level summit, with a partial view over the Blackhead Range to the southeast, and another partial view northwest at the west end of the summit. It then begins a steady descent.

 

Windham High Peak

25.2 Windham High Peak from Burnt Knob. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

 

6.75 The trail enters the first of two groves of Norway spruce trees planted by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. The trail climbs over the tangled roots of these trees. Between the two groves, the trail passes through a small open area.

7.40 The trail passes the Elm Ridge Lean-to, to the left of the trail.

7.45 The Long Path turns right at a junction, continuing along the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, as the yellow-blazed Elm Ridge Trail descends to the left for 0.85 miles to the parking area at the end of Peck Road. The Long Path now follows a wide snowmobile trail, the route of an old turnpike across the mountains.

7.60 Turn left, leaving the old road, and continue to descend on a narrower path.

7.70 Turn sharply to the right and descend steeply.

8.55 After passing a trail register, the trail crosses a bridge over a stream and reaches NY Route 23 near East Windham. To continue, go across Route 23 and follow Cross Road to the northwest.

26. NY Route 23 to Greene County Route 10

Features: Ginseng Mountain, Mt. Hayden
Distance: 7.20 miles
USGS Map Quads: Hensonville
Trail Conference Map: Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

In this section, the Long Path leaves the Catskill Park after a journey of 94 miles and continues to the north. The terrain is similar to that found in the Catskills, but on a smaller scale. The primary ridge followed by the trail in this section is a continuation of the Catskill Escarpment. For some of the distance along the ridge the trail follows logging roads. The area is still alive with logging activity, but the forest recovers quickly where there has not been any clear cutting. There are no great open views, but there are many good views along the way when the leaves are down. The trail crosses two notches, Jennie and Barlow, which are bisected by the remnants of old mountain turnpikes that connected the mountains to the valley to the east. The first 0.75 miles of the section goes through state land and is marked with blue DEC trail markers, while the rest of the section is on a mixture of NYC-DEP land, Trail Conference land, and state land, and is marked with aqua Long Path paint blazes. On the NYCDEP lands lands,  no camping and no fires of any kind are permitted.There are no water sources in this section along the ridge.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue on NY Route 23 west approximately 20 miles to East Windham. About 0.5 miles past the "Entering Catskill Park" sign, there is a DEC parking area for the Escarpment Trail and Windham Mountain at the intersection of Route 23 and Cross Road.

Parking

0.00 Parking area on NY Route 23 in East Windham, at intersection with Cross Road. (42.31280°, -74.19024°)
1.35 NYC-DEP parking area at the end of Jennie Notch Road, past the first gate (which is kept open). (42.32789°, -74.18847°) Do not park on the road near the house.
6.55 Intersection of Sutton Road and Cunningham Road. (42.37305°, -74.22457°)
7.20 Greene County Route 10, about 200 feet north of the trail intersection. (42.37532°, -74.23265°)

Trail Description

0.00 From the intersection of NY Route 23 and Cross Road proceed north on Cross Road for about 150 feet, just beyond the DEC parking area. The Long Path, blazed with blue DEC trail markers, then turns right, crosses a small field and enters the woods. The trail continues east, parallel to Route 23, crosses a stone wall, passes through a swampy area and then crosses another stone wall.

0.30 Here we leave the Catskill Park, which the Long Path has traversed for the last 94 miles. The trail turns left, away from Route 23, and ascends gradually to an old spruce and hemlock forest. From here, the trail descends gradually to the left.

0.75 Cross Old Road and continue north on Jennie Notch Road. The Long Path now leaves state land, and for the remainder of the section it is marked with aqua paint blazes.

1.30 After passing several houses, Jennie Notch Road officially ends at an old red brick house. The trail passes through an open gate onto NYC-DEP land and continues along a gravel road to the DEP parking lot and a closed gate. The gravel road becomes overgrown as it follows the route of an old 19th century mountain turnpike uphill to Jennie Notch. 

 

Windham escarpment

26.1 Escarpment off the Jennie Notch Road extension. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

2.10 Passing through another open gate, the trail leaves DEP land and enters land owned by New York New Jersey Trail Conference. In this area there are limited views across the valley to Windham Mountain.

2.35 At the height of land, the trail turns sharply to the left and begins a steep climb up Ginseng Mountain frequently turning on and off old logging roads. After a small downhill and another steep uphill, there are some snatches of views to the northeast across the lowlands toward Albany. The trail passes north of and below the summit of Ginseng Mountain.

2.80 The trail descends and crosses onto state land (yellow survey blazes). The trail is on state land for the rest of the section, but often follows close to the border with NYC-DEP land (red survey blazes).

3.30 After descending a rock step, the trail follows a logging road along the level for a while, then turns left off the logging road and soon passes between some large rocks. At the end of the mostly level stretch the trail turns sharply right and climbs steeply up an unnamed knob.

3.70 Reach the top of the knob. The trail now descends steeply, passing a view to the north just before descending a steep switchback through a rock ledge.

4.00 Barlow Notch. Here the trail crosses another mountain turnpike and passes through a level area in the notch. The trail then descends slightly in order to stay on state land as it heads north out of the notch.

4.05 Sutton Memorial. The trail turns sharply left, crosses a logging road, and begins a steep switchback ascent up to the ridge.

4.30 The trail reaches a shoulder of the ridge and levels out for a bit. There are winter views of Lake Heloise through the trees to the southwest. Soon the trail begins climbing again, but less steeply.

5.00 After traversing the summit plateau, the trail passes about 100 feet south of the true summit of Mt. Hayden, where it makes a sharp left turn and begins to descend. It leaves the summit on a round about route to avoid cliffs and a former land boundary, and eventually heads down the north ridge.

Windham+Dave
26.2 Foggy woods. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

5.50 After descending steadily, the trail reaches the top of a steep sidehill down an extremely steep slope. This stretch may be treacherous in snow. There are views through the trees to the north at the top of the steepest area. After about a tenth of a mile, the sidehill ends and the trail descends a little less steeply.

5.80 The trail turns left onto an old logging road and levels out. Midway through the level stretch the logging road angles off downhill to the right but the trail continues level.

6.20 At the end of the level stretch, the trail steps off a short rock ledge and begins a steady descent to Sutton Road.

6.55 Turn left onto dirt Sutton Road close to its fork with Cunningham Road. Cross both roads and re-enter the woods. The trail turns left and angles away from Cunningham Road, descending gradually to a small stream crossing. Soon a second small stream is crossed, but both of these streams may be dry in late summer.

7.20 After a brief climb, reach Greene County Route 10. Turn right (north). In about 200 feet there is a parking area on the east side of Route 10. To continue, cross Route 10 before the parking area and proceed uphill into the woods.

Northern Catskills

As the Long Path heads west and then north, the tall mountains of the Catskills are soon left behind; they become lower and lower until they are mere hills standing above the plain. Much of the trail now parallels the Schoharie Valley, an important route into the Catskills from points north. Early Dutch settlers made their homes here; there are many reminders of their past in the names of the places one passes. A major feature of the area is the reservoir complex maintained by the New York State Power Authority. In addition to hydroelectric power, the Schoharie Reservoir is a member of the great Catskill water reservoirs that supply distant New York City with clean drinking water.

wildflowers

Wildflowers by the trailside. 2001 [ED WALSH]

27. Greene County Route 10 to South Mountain Road in Conesville, Schoharie County

Features: Mt. Pisgah, Richtmyer Peak, Richmond Mountain
Distance: 7.10 miles
USGS Map Quads: Hensonville, Durham, Livingstonville, Ashland
Trail Conference Map: Long Path North on the back of Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

This lightly traveled section of the Long Path passes through the first of many state reforestation areas between the Catskills and the Mohawk River. As a consequence of reforestation there are large bramble patches, which can make hiking less pleasurable. Long pants are recommended, and the hiking experience is distinctly back country. The trail climbs steeply up Mt. Pisgah, follows the ridgetop over Richtmeyer Peak, and climbs a shoulder of Richmond Mountain. The trail continues on a logging road before descending to Bluebird Road through a Norway spruce plantation. On its way it passes through both mixed deciduous forests and plantations of red pine and Norway spruce. There are a few good views, both north towards the southern Adirondacks, and south towards the Blackhead Range and the Devil's Path. All of this section is marked with Long Path Aqua paint blazes. A side trail near the end of the section provides great ridge walking with many views through the trees when the leaves are down. This side trail traverses some of the highest peaks in the Catskills outside the "Blue Line," including Asland Pinnacle and Huntersfield Mountain which has a lean-to.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue on NY Route 23 west approximately 20 miles to the Town of Windham. In Windham, turn right on Mitchell Hollow Road (Greene County Route 21) and go north about 5 miles to Greene County Route 10. Turn right on Route 10, which continues east for about a third of a mile and then curves left. Cunningham Road continues straight ahead here; stay on Route 10. About 1/4 miles past the curve, the Long Path begins just after a woods road goes off to the left.

Parking

0.00 Pullout off Greene County Route 10, about 200 feet south of the trailhead. (42.37532°, -74.23265°)
2.65 Parking area 0.4 mi from the Long Path. A woods road blazed with yellow DEC discs leads to the trail. Take Mt. Pisgah Road off Greene County Route 10, in 0.4 mi turn right onto a forest road, and follow this to the parking area at the end (1.35 mi). (42.37351°, -74.26306°)
4.60 Parking area off Bluebird Road (formerly CCC Road #2). (42.36873°, -74.28938°). This road is not maintained from December 1 to April 1.
5.70 Parking area just beyond the point where the Long Path reaches forest road. (42.36172°, -74.30128°).
7.10 Roadside parking on forest road off South Mountain Road. (42.37356°, -74.31530°)

Trail Description

0.00 From where the trail reached Greene County Route 10, proceed north past the parking area and turn left.

0.05 The Long Path proceeds uphill on a trail marked with aqua paint blazes and passes through a red pine plantation. It skirts the south side of an old quarry, then curves right along the west side of the quarry. The trail reaches an interesting rock wall and follows it to the right.

0.25 The trail makes a sharp switchback to the left and passes through a cleft in the cliff. It continues gradually uphill through the woods, crossing a few more low escarpments. The trail turns right onto an eroded woods road and continues uphill. There are lots of brambles.

0.55 The Long Path turns sharp left onto another woods road and begins climbing steeply.

0.65 The trail turns sharply to the right onto another woods road and continues uphill. Mt. Hayden can be seen from here when there are no leaves on the trees. Soon the trail turns right and leaves the road. It climbs steeply.

0.85 To the right are good views of the valley of the Manor Kill. The Long Path passes through some bramble patches and continues on a woods road for a short distance.

0.95 The woods road continues straight ahead, the trail turns left for the final ascent to the summit of Mt. Pisgah.

1.10 Reach the summit of Mt. Pisgah. This was formerly the site of a summit observatory. Remnants of the well that supplied water to the site may still be seen about 100 ft straight ahead, on the left side of the old carriage road that provided access from the valley. The summit was once cleared of vegetation, but today it is covered with a mature Norway spruce and red pine grove. There is a view to the north of the Helderbergs and the Adirondacks in the distance. At the summit, the Long Path turns right, soon crosses a stone wall, and descends through the forest. There is an interesting contrast here between the deep greens of the spruce and pine grove and the lighter greens of the deciduous forest to the right.

Mt. Pisgah summit marker

27.1 USCGS marker at the summit of Mt. Pisgah. 2012 [JAKOB FRANKE]


1.40 The trail leaves the evergreen grove, continues to descend to the left of a low escarpment, and reaches the col between Mt. Pisgah and Richtmyer Peak.

1.45 The trail veers right through the escarpment and begins a gradual ascent, skirting below private land to the north.

1.60 The Long Path crosses an old logging road, turns right, and ascends to the top of the ridge, then turns left to follow the ridge. After a level stretch, the trail continues to ascend to Richtmyer Peak. This entire area is covered with brambles.

2.55 The Long Path reaches the flat summit of Richtmeyer Peak. To the left there is a seasonal view through the trees towards the Blackhead Range. The trail now turns right and makes a short descent to the col between Richtmeyer Peak and Richmond Mountain.

2.65 The trail reaches a logging road and the start of a trail (yellow DEC markers) that leaves to the left and leads in 0.4 miles to a parking area. The trail crosses the logging road and continues uphill to the east summit of Richmond Mountain.

2.90 To the left a short side trail leads to a view to the south, with the Blackhead Range, Kaaterskill High Peak and the Devil's Path visible.The Long Path continues along the ridge and descends to the col between the two peaks of Richmond Mountain. Here it levels and follows the north shoulder of the main peak, then begins a steep descent.

Blackhead Range 

27.2 The Blackhead Range from Richmond Mountain. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

3.20 The trail reaches a wet area and turns left onto a logging road. In a tenth of a mile the road makes a jog, then goes straight, while the trail turns right. There are seasonal views to the north.

3.55 The Long Path reaches another logging road and turns left, following the road. In about a tenth of a mile an overgrown logging road heads down to the right. The trail continues straight on the road.

3.75 The trail reaches another woods road. Turn left.

3.95 The Long Path turns right into the woods, descending through a Norway spruce plantation, and crossing a few seasonal streams.

4.30 Near the large root mass of an uprooted pine tree the trail approaches a small ravine with a permanent stream on the left, and keeps descending along the stream.

4.45 Turn left onto Bluebird Road (gravel road) and follow it uphill.

4.60 The Long Path turns right into a parking area on the west (right) side of Bluebird Road. Sign in at the registration box at the north end of the parking area, proceed to the southern end of the parking area, turn right, and follow the Long Path blazes west. The trail can be wet in this area, then soon passes through a pine plantation.

4.80 Cross a small stream. The trail now slowly ascends through mixed forest, crosses a few stone walls, and passes by a couple of stone pillars on the right.

5.40 The trail turns sharply left, soon after passing DEP signs, and starts a steep ascent through forest consisting of mostly spruce and striped maple.

5.70 Reach a maintained forest road. (The old Long Path route to the left, to Ashland Pinnacle, the Huntersfield Mountain Shelter, and Albert Slater Road, has now been blazed with red DEC disks.) The Long Path turns right and follows the forest road downhill.

7.10 Reach South Mountain Road, the end of Section 27.

LP-Schoharie-Greene

27.3 Stone pillars off the trail. 2010 [JAKOB FRANKE]

28. South Mountain Road in Conesville, Schoharie County to West Conesville

Feature: Scenic road walks, Manor Kill and Manor Kill Falls
Distance: 8.50 miles
USGS Map Quads: Ashland, Prattsville, Gilboa, Livingstonville
Trail Conference Map: Long Path North on the back of Trail Map 141 (Northeastern Catskill Trails)

General Description

This section of the Long Path is a mixture of pleasant woods walks and scenic road walks. The Long Path follows South Mountain Road, which has outstanding scenery, for about 3 miles. The trail then passes near Sicklers Mountain on private land, and reaches the ravine of the Manor Kill just before the section ends, providing great views of the Manor Kill and Manor Kill Falls.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue west on NY Route 23 for about 8 miles. Keep right on NY Route 145 and continue about 11 miles, then keep left onto Greene County Route 22. Continue straight onto Greene County Route 20 for about 4 miles. The road changes into Durham Road when it enters Schoharie County. In another 2 miles turn left onto Toles Hollow Road, then turn right onto South Mountain Road. In less than 2 miles the Long Path will come in from a forest road on the left, across from Cook Road on the right. 

Parking

0.00 A few cars can be parked near the corner of South Mountain Road and the forest road. (42.37356°, -74.31530°)
3.80 There is parking in Conesville. (unlocated)
7.00 Pangman Road (formerly Pangburn Road) (limited parking). (42.36942°, -74.41737°)
8.50 NY Route 990V and Prattsville Road (Schoharie County Route 39). (42.38064°, -74.43084°

Camping

Camping is available to backpackers in the reforestation areas near the start of this section. You may camp anywhere in the reforestation areas, as long as you stay 150 feet away from the trail and from water.

Trail Description

0.00 Turn left (west) on South Mountain Road. The next several miles will be roadwalking, but the scenery is outstanding.

3.05 Turn left on Potter Mountain Road (formerly Schoharie County Road 3).

3.80 Turn left onto Champlin Road in the hamlet of Conesville.

4.45 Turn right into the woods. For the next few miles the trail follows mostly old woods roads, and passes north of Sicklers Mountain. The trail is on private land here. Please respect the property, and sign the log book at the start of the trail.

The trail is closed from mile 4.45 to mile 7.15 during hunting season (October 1 to December 15), and you'll have to continue on Route 990V in the hamlet of Conesville.

woods in Schoharie County

28.1 Woods on the foot of Sicklers Mountain. 2010 [JAKOB FRANKE]

6.65 The Long Path turns sharply right on a woods road, then turns sharply left off the woods road.

6.85 The trail crosses hoses for the collection of maple sap, and an old barbed wire fence.

6.90 Turn sharply left onto an old overgrown woods road. To the right are views of the valley of the Manor Kill and the mountains north of it.

7.00 Turn left off the road. The trail goes slightly uphill, and follows to the right of a stone wall with barbed wire on top, and DEP signs.

7.15 The trail pases by a few old antennas and reaches Pangman Road, which is a gravel road. The Long Path turns left on Pangman Road, and in 100 ft turns right into the woods again.

7.35 An unmarked trail joins from the right.

7.65 There are views of the valley and mountains to the right. The trail follows an old chainlink and barbed wire fence on the right.

7.75 Turn right across the fence. There now is a barbed-wire fence on the left. The trail crosses a seasonal stream, turns left, then turns right, still following a barbed-wire fence. There are views to the right.

7.85 Turn left again, still following a barbed-wire fence.

8.05 The trail approaches a paved road, but turns right before it gets there, and continues over a small hill.

8.15 The ravine of the Manor Kill is to the right, the road to the left. The trail continues over another small hill.

8.25 Great viewpoint over the Manor Kill ravine and beyond.

8.35 The trail turns left and follows a woods road.

8.40 About 50 feet to the right is a good vantage point to admire the Manor Kill Falls.

8.50 The trail reaches Prattsville Road (Schoharie County Route 39), after turning left around a chain-link fence. To the right is the bridge across the Manor Kill, and the junction with Route 990V.

Manor Kill Falls

28.2 Manor Kill Falls. 2010 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

29. West Conesville to Doney Hollow

Features: Mine Kill State Park with Mine Kill Falls, and Lansing Manor
Distance: 13.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Gilboa
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

In this section, the Long Path leaves the rugged terrain of the Catskills and descends into the Schoharie Valley. After passing the Schoharie Reservoir, which is the northernmost outpost of the New York City water supply system, the Long Path begins a 30-mile journey along the Schoharie Valley and the hills surrounding Schoharie Creek. The trail passes through Mine Kill State Park, whose primary attraction is Mine Kill Falls. The Long Path passes both the top and the bottom of the falls, which plummet out of a spectacular gorge. Between the falls and the main part of the park, the trail follows a beautiful pine and hemlock forest. In the north end of the park are spectacular open views of the Schoharie Valley. Beyond Mine Kill State Park, the trail passes through the Lansing Manor Visitors Center of the Power Authority’s Blenheim–Gilboa pumped storage complex. There are expansive views up the Schoharie Valley from both Mine Kill State Park and Lansing Manor.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue west on NY Route 23 for about 30 miles to the Village of Prattsville. At the end of Prattsville, NY Route 23 crosses a steel bridge that goes over Schoharie Creek. Just before the bridge, turn right on Prattsville Road, and follow it for about 5 miles to the intersection of Prattsville Road and Route 990V.

Parking

0.00 Intersection of NY Route 990V and Prattsville Road. (42.38064°, -74.43084°)
1.20 Gilboa Dam overlook. (42.39278°, -74.44705°)
3.40 Pullout near the Nickerson Campground entrance. (Unlocated)
8.05 At north end of swimming pool, when park is open. (42.43792°, -74.45597°)
8.95 Lansing Manor Visitors Center. (42.44886°, -74.46452°)
10.15 On North Access Road near turnoff for fishing access to Schoharie Creek. (Unlocated)
13.45 West Kill Road at Doney Hollow. (42.48519°, -74.48447°)

Camping

3.40 Campsites available at Nickerson Park Campground (fee charged).

Camping is allowed in the state reforestation areas 150 feet from the trail and water.

Trail Description

0.00 At the intersection of Prattsville Road and NY Route 990V, the Long Path turns left and follows NY Route 990V downhill toward Gilboa. On the left side of the trail is the Schoharie Reservoir.

0.90 On the left is the former site of the Gilboa Settlement. From 1840 to 1869, a cotton mill, tannery, church and cemetery stood on the ground that is now covered by the Schoharie Reservoir. On the right is the Gilboa–Conesville Central School.

1.05 Bear right on  Wyckoff Road.

1.20 Opposite the school playground turn left into the woods.

1.30 New York City DEP property line. Follow the property line for a short distance and continue downhill through mixed woods.

1.60 Reach the intersection of Route 990V and Flat Creek Road, near the Gilboa Town Hall and Post Office. On the right, a few yards past the town hall, is an exhibit of fossilized trees. They were discovered while constructing the Schoharie Reservoir. The Long Path continues along NY Route 990V, which curves left and goes downhill.

1.80 The Long Path crosses Schoharie Creek on a bridge. There is a small cemetery to the right, just past the bridge.

2.00 Turn right onto Stryker Road. Pass the Gilboa Museum on the right (open only on summer weekends; check the website).

2.50 Pass a large farm and B&B on the left, with views of Schoharie Creek to the right.

2.60 The road is closed to traffic.

3.40 Turn right from Stryker Road into Nickerson's Campground and past the campground store.

3.55 Turn right off the camp road onto a trail which parallels the camp road and overlooks the Schoharie Creek.

3.80 Turn right, back onto the camp road, then turn left onto another camp road. Continue on this road past the pool area to the end of the campground.

4.30 Leave Nickerson's Campground at campsite 620. Enter the NYS Power Authority Corridor with the boundary marked with orange stakes. The trail has several ups and downs in the next half a mile.

4.75 The Long Path passes a National Recreation Trail marker.

4.85 Go up a bank and turn right. In about 150 ft pass by a ledge overlooking the Schoharie Creek and turn left. Enter an open area with scattered red cedar trees. There are nice views of the Schoharie Creek and the reservoir from the ledges through this section.

5.05 Cross a ledge above a small stream entering the reservoir. Turn left downhill, and in 0.2 miles cross the stream on a beautiful I-beam bridge that was designed and built in 2017 by Tahawus Trials, LLC for the New York Power Authority. Follow the stream down to where it reaches the Schoharie Creek, and  turn left up the bank.

5.45 Enter an open area under the power line. Turn right on the power line access road for about 150 feet and then turn left toward the woodlands. Cross a hill covered with a pine forest.

5.65 Turn left on a woods road with the Mine Kill to the right. There are several ups and downs along the way.

6.25 Turn right leaving old woods road. Start downhill toward the Mine Kill and reach a ledge overlooking the Mine Kill in 100 yards. Follow a long switchback down to a foot bridge and a trail junction.

 

If the water conditions are low:

6.50 Turn right onto the white trail heading  to the bottom of the Mine Kill Falls. Continue on the white trail adjacent to the Mine Kill.

6.70 The trail crosses the stream on large boulders that have been placed in the stream.

6.80 (7.35 below) The white trail rejoins the Long Path. Turn right to continue north. This shortens the hike by about half a mile.

If the water conditions are high:

6.50 Mine Kill Falls is to the right. A short trail leads to the bottom of the falls. The Long Path starts uphill.

6.75 A walkway to the right leads to the falls overlook and is worth visiting. Continue straight through the Mine Kill Falls parking lot and turn right onto NY Route 30. Follow the road over the bridge. There are views of the upper falls from the bridge.

7.10 After crossing the bridge, turn right and head downhill. 

22-lpg

29.1 Mine Kill Falls. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN] 


7.15 Turn left with views of the Mine Kill to the right. The trail crosses a small stream.

7.35 (6.80 above) A white-blazed trail comes in from the right.

7.45 The trail crosses a stream on a new bridge. To the left is a beautiful cascading waterfall. The trail climbs continuously from here to the park entrance road. Part way up, the trail passes several rock piles on the right. Near the top, two trails lead right; the Long Path continues straight ahead.

7.75 The trail emerges onto an open field and crosses the main park entrance road. It continues on the western edge of an open field to reach the park administration building.

7.85 To the right is the park administration building, where there are restroom facilities. The trail bears left and follows a mowed path at the western end of an open field with scattered evergreens. From this path, there is a spectacular view up and down the Schoharie Valley.

8.05 The trail turns right and descends along the northern boundary of a soccer field, then passes a small playground that is just north of the swimming pool.

8.25 Turn left and follow a cross-country ski and snowmobile trail that leads from Mine Kill State Park to Lansing Manor. Here, there is a spectacular view north along the Schoharie Valley and across the Blenheim-Gilboa Reservoir. Soon, a yellow-blazed cross-country ski trail leaves to the right. The Long Path continues straight ahead.

8.55 The trail crosses an open field with scattered cedar trees, leaving Mine Kill State Park and entering the New York State Power Authority Lansing Manor Blenheim-Gilboa complex. The boundary is not marked. Note the fences around the small cedar trees. These trees are pruned so as to provide the deer with a source of browse. The fences prevent the deer from killing the trees. There are also a number of bluebird feeders. Be sure to watch for the Long Path blazes on top of the fence posts by the cedar trees.

8.95 The Long Path enters a picnic area and then crosses the parking lot of the Lansing Manor Visitors Center. At the far end of the parking lot, the trail follows a walkway through the Visitors Center, where brochures on the historic Lansing Manor and the Blenheim–Gilboa pumped storage power plant are available. Brochures are also available at the nearby museum. There are picnic tables at the Visitor Center, making this an ideal lunch stop in the warm months.

 

visitor center

29.2 Lansing Manor Visitor Center. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]


9.15 Take the left fork in the walkway and pass the entrance to the museum. The Long Path now heads across a field with trees, skirts a wooded area on the right, then turns right and cuts diagonally across another field to enter the woods.

9.40 After a rather steep descent, reach the bottom of a ravine. The trail now ascends gradually  and crosses a powerline right-of-way.

9.70 Reach the top of a hill, with a view down to the dam of the Blenheim–Gilboa Reservoir. During periods of low electrical demand, water is pumped up the hill to the reservoir. During periods of high demand, the water is released, thus generating electricity.

10.05 Turn left down a bank to cross a small stream, then turn right to the NY Power Authority'sNorth Access Road. Turn left, and in about 100 ft turn right off road and down the bank.

10.20 The trail turns left just before reaching the Schoharie Creek. This section, which may be overgrown at times, has views of the creek throughout. During flood conditions this section may be flooded and it will be necessary to walk the access road to NY Route 30.

10.60 Turn left up a ladder next to a measurement station, then turn right on the Power Authority's North Access Road.

10.75 Reach NY Route 30, turn right across the bridge, then turn left onto Creamery Road. Pass a cemetery on the right.

11.00  Turn right uphill into the woods at the very end of the cemetry, across from house no. 137 on the left. In about a tenth of a mile pass a stone wall. Soon you’ll reach a hedgerow and pass another stonewall on the right.

11.25 Turn left across the corner of a field and turn left along the hedgerow.

11.35 Go down a short steep bank to West Kill Road and turn left on the road.

11.55 Intersection of West Kill Road (Schoharie County Route 43) and Burnt Hill Road; continue on West Kill Road.

11.75 Just past a driveway, turn left into woods.

11.90 The Long Path crosses West Kill Road to the north side of the road, making a short left-right jog. (Between October 10 and December 15 this section is closed for hiking. During that time follow West Kill Road for about 0.8 mi, past the beaver pond on the right, and turn left into the woods 100 ft past a DEC boundary sign.)

12.05 Turn left onto a woods road.

12.25 Turn left leaving woods road, and in one-tenth of a mile turn left again, back onto woods road.

12.70 The Long Path turns left and downhill, toward a beaver pond.

12.85 The trail enters a State Reforestation Area.

12.90 The trail crosses West Kill Road to the south side of the road and descends to West Kill Creek. The trail continues west along the creek.

13.30 The trail turns right and climbs back up toWest Kill Road, turns left, and follows the road for about 0.15 miles, across Doney Hollow. There is room to park several cars here.

13.55 This section ends where the trail turns right to follow Doney Hollow.

 

 Lansing Manor

 29.3 Lansing Manor. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

 

30. Doney Hollow to West Fulton

Feature: Eminence State Forest
Distance: 8.60 miles
USGS Map Quads: Gilboa, Breakabeen
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

In this section, the Long Path passes from Doney Hollow to the highlands of Eminence State Forest. While there are no great views in this section, the trail is full of glimpses of the area’s historic past. Along the way, the trail passes through sites of abandoned sawmills, gristmills and cemeteries, evidence that this area was once settled. In the early to mid-1800s, this area was home to some of the earliest settlements in the Schoharie region. During the depression in the 1930s, the State purchased many of the marginal farms in this area to establish state reforestation areas. The CCC built some primitive roads on this newly acquired state land. This section of the Long Path gradually ascends from Doney Hollow to the highlands of the Burnt Hill Reforestation Area. It then descends to Cole Hollow before again climbing to the level highlands of Rossman Hill. From there, the trail descends steeply to Sawyer Hollow and the Village of West Fulton. For part of the way, the Long Path follows the Schoharie Trail, which was constructed in the early 1980s by the SUNY Cobleskill Outing Club. In areas where the Schoharie Trail follows drivable roads, the Long Path follows newly constructed trail.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Continue on NY Route 23 west for 35 miles to Grand Gorge. In Grand Gorge, turn right, and follow NY Route 30 north for about 8 miles to North Blenheim. Turn left on West Kill Road, which is the second left after Route 30 crosses the West Kill, and follow West Kill Road for 2 miles to Doney Hollow.

Parking

0.00 At West Kill Road in Doney Hollow. (42.48519°, -74.48447°)
5.00 On Duck Pond Road by the brook. (42.53787°, -74.48214°)
6.40 DEC trailhead parking lot on Morey Road. (42.54862°, -74.49069°)
7.40 Sawyer Hollow Road where Long Path enters the road. (42.55906°, -74.48641°)
8.90 Village of West Fulton picnic area. (42.56438°, -74.46290°)

Camping

Camping is allowed in the state reforestation areas 150 feet from the trail and water.
5.85 Rossman Hill Lean-to.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path turns right off West Kill Road and follows an old road up Doney Hollow. This section of the Long Path, which is marked with Long Path aqua blazes, heads uphill on the left side of the stream and soon starts a large switchback to the left because the old road ahead has been washed out. [The original route followed the Schoharie Trail, constructed in the early 1980s by the Cobleskill Outing Club (COC). Its start is designated by a COC trail marker.]

doney-hollow     doney-hollow

30.1 and 30.2 Doney Hollow. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE]


0.40 The trail reaches the old road along the stream again.

0.55 The trail crosses Doney Hollow on a bridge and continues uphill on the right side of the stream. In about half a mile stone walls appear on the right.

1.05 To the left is a large man-made structure, constructed of local rock. This is the site of one of the two water-powered sawmills that operated along Doney Hollow in the mid 1800s. The rock structure was part of an impoundment of the stream. This section of the trail is on the Burnt Hill Reforestation Area of Eminence State Forest. Burnt Hill got its name from the many wildfires that spread through this area in the early 1900s, improving the huckleberry crop. One part of the area was known as Huckleberry Kingdom. Today, the area has become a mature forest, and the state periodically harvests the timber here. The trail continues on the old road, flanked on the right with stone walls.

Section30 sawmill

30.3 Remnants of saw mill in Doney Hollow. 2015 [JAKOB FRANKE]


1.45 A woods road comes in from the right. On the left is the site of a homestead. The Long Path continues straight ahead. The trail passes through a stand of red pines and be­gins to level off, passing through an area that is occasionally wet.

1.90 The old woods road ends at the gravel Burnt Hill Road. The Long Path crosses Burnt Hill Road and continues north through the woods.

2.15 An opening to the left leads to a large unnamed pond off Burnt Hill Road. Camping is allowed in the state reforestation areas 150 feet away from the trail or water. The trail continues ahead through the woods to the right of the pond, crossing a short bog bridge and a small bridge.

2.40 The trail reaches the crest of Burnt Hill, turns left, and begins a steep descent to Cole Hollow.

2.50 Turn right and begin to follow a snowmobile trail.

2.60 Turn left onto an old logging road, leaving the snowmobile trail. The logging road soon ends, and as the trail descends it follows a series of switchbacks, eventually turning left and descending on an old woods road to the bottom of Cole Hollow.

3.00 The trail reaches the stream and continues west, close to the stream.

3.30 Turn left on gravel Cole Hollow Road, and continue uphill on the road. To the right the gravel road crosses the stream on a bridge.

3.85 Just after crossing into the Town of Fulton, Cole Hollow Road turns left. The Long Path turns right and follows gravel Huckleberry Kingdom Road.

3.95 On the right is the site of an old homestead, at the corner of an open field.

4.20 The trail goes back into state land and soon crosses a small stream. Just after the stream crossing, the trail turns left off the road, and follows the stream uphill.

4.35 The trail passes a cellar hole on the left, and a number of stone walls on the right. This is said to be the site of the childhood home of Henry Conklin. Author of ‘Through Poverty’s Vale’, he wrote about the difficulty of eking out a living in these hills around 1840. This book, an interest­ing early history of the Schoharie Valley, is available at the Old Stone Fort in Scho­harie. The Long Path parallels the stream while it continues uphill through a hemlock gorge.

4.80 Turn left and cross the stream on a bridge, following a tributary uphill. Near the top of the hill, the trail turns right and leaves the stream. Here, to the left, there is a series of cascading waterfalls along the stream.

5.00 The Long Path turns left onto the first of a series of CCC-constructed roads. Just before Duck Pond Road crosses the stream, there is a small parking area. Near a concrete abutment along the stream, the trail turns right, makes a short, steep climb to pass a small old cemetery, and then descends to the left to cross the stream. With high water this may no be an easy crossing. The trail switchbacks to the left and then turns back to the right, following the stream for a short distance. The trail then leaves the stream and continues uphill.

5.20 Turn right and continue between two stone walls. In the next mile the trail passes lots of stone walls.

5.40 Cross Burnt Hill Road and continue west through the woods. There is room to park several cars here.

5.65 The trail crosses a stream on a new bridge and enters the flat area of Rossman Hill.

5.85 The Long Path passes the Rossman Hill Lean-to. Water is available from a well located 100 yards in front of the lean-to, which may be dry in summer. The trail passes through a hemlock stand, then enters a pine forest, and continues in a generally northwesterly direction.

6.25 The trail passes an area on the right that was clear cut in 2013-2014. Soon Rossman Hill Cemetery is visible to the right.

6.35 Reach Morey Road. Here, the trail bears left, crosses the road, and enters a parking area. One hundred feet to the right is the historic Rossman Hill Cemetery. Its large size is a good indication of how many people lived in these hills prior to reforestation. Past the cemetery on the right was the site of the Rossman Hill Methodist Church, which was abandoned in the 1930s. There is no evidence of the church today. 

 

 section30 looking glass pond

30.4 Looking Glass Pond. 2015 [JAKOB FRANKE]


6.45 The trail reaches the edge of Looking Glass Pond and turns right. The West Fulton Rod and Gun Club constructed this 20-acre pond. The trail intersects a yellow-blazed mountain bike trail that circles the pond. Across the pond are fishing piers. At the dam the Long Path turns right and follows the pond’s outlet stream downhill.

6.60 Cross Rossman Hill Road and continue to follow the stream downhill, passing a series of cascades.

6.65 At the bottom of the cascades there is an old stone foundation, which was once the site of a gristmill. Please help protect what is remaining. The stonework is very fragile. The trail follows the stream steeply down to Sawyer Hollow, passing several waterfalls along the way.

section30 fall1     section30 fall2

30.5 and 30.6 Falls in the Looking Glass Pond outlet stream. 2015 [JAKOB FRANKE]


7.05 Near the bottom of the hillside the trail crosses a stream on a wooden bridge, then heads east to another bridge over Panther Creek. 

7.20 From the bridge, turn right and follow along the creek bed downstream to an old logging road that crosses an open field up to Sawyer Hollow Road. If traveling from the opposite direction, one reaches this point just uphill from a DEC fishermen’s parking sign.

7.40 Turn right (east) onto paved Sawyer Hollow Road (CR 20) and follow it into West Fulton. About 200 ft to the left is a small parking area. This road closely follows the route of an old Native American trail that was used during the Revolution by the British in October 1780. On the left the hiker passes the Peter Smith Church, built in 1831 by the founder of West Fulton. At one time it was featured in Ripley’s “Believe It or Not,” because its steeple and bell were located on the hill behind the church. Since then, the church was turned around and the steeple and bell were put in place. It is currently a private residence.

8.60 Reach the Village of West Fulton at an intersection with West Fulton Road. To the right on West Fulton Road and across the stream there is a picnic area on the left side of the road, with room to park several cars. To continue, proceed straight ahead on Patria Road.

 

west-fulton

30.7 West Fulton. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

31. West Fulton to Middleburgh

Features: Patria State Forest and Vroman’s Nose
Distance: 11.80 miles
USGS Map Quads: Breakabeen, Middleburgh
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

Leaving West Fulton, the Long Path regains the highlands west of Schoharie Creek. The trail continues through pleasant reforestation areas and passes through stands of mature pine and spruce, with occasional evidence of the early settlement in this area. After descending steeply to cross Pleasant Valley, the Long Path climbs over the top of a hill, and then descends to Hardscrabble Road near NY Route 30, with dramatic views of the Schoharie Valley. The Long Path follows NY Route 30 north through Vroomansland, the flat floodplain of Schoharie Creek. The trail ascends Vroman’s Nose on the steep red trail. A sentinel over the Schoharie Valley, Vroman’s Nose is one of the most spectacular natural features in New York. The Long Path descends off Vroman’s Nose to the north on the blue trail, crosses Vroomansland, and follows the edge of Schoharie Creek to the Village of Middleburgh.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 in Catskill. Continue west on NY Route 23 about 8 miles to NY Route 145, then west on Route 145 about 30 miles to the Village of Middleburgh. In Middleburgh, take NY Route 30 south about 8 miles to West Fulton Road (Schoharie County Route 4). Then turn right on West Fulton Road and follow it for 3 miles to West Fulton.

Parking

0.00 West Fulton town picnic area. (42.56438°, -74.46290°)
2.00 On Patria Road. (42.56661°, -74.45144°)
3.00 On Mallon Road. (42.58499°, -74.43881°)
5.60 Small parking area. Directions: drive north on Patria Road to the intersection with Greenbush Hill  Road, turn right and in about 0.7 miles there is an intersection with Snow Ridge Drive. At this point Greenbush Hill Road turns to the left and Snow Ridge Drive continues straight ahead. There are signs on both roads saying private roads. Continue on Snow Ridge Drive, which is still a public Right-of-Way (ROW). In another 0.5 miles there is a road to the right. This a DEC maintained road providing access to a portion of Patria State Forest. This intersection is at 42.60635°, -74.41105°. There is a sign at this intersection that says private land, but this does not pertain to the road. Start up the DEC road and in about 0.1 mile you will enter the Patria State Forest and in about another 0.25 miles there is a small parking lot on the left. The parking lot is at 42.60172°, -74.41352°. There is a lightly used trail off the back of the parking lot, blazed with red paint, that comes to the LP at 42.60145°, -74.41262°.
10.45 Church Street and the blue trailhead on Vroman’s Nose. (42.59335°, -74.35041°)
11.80 Village of Middleburgh (town park; elementary school). (Unlocated)

Camping

Camping is allowed in the state reforestation areas 150 feet away from the trail and water.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path leaves West Fulton on Patria Road. Continue uphill on Patrai Road, continue along the road as it makes a sharp left. 

0.80 Just past a sharp bend to the right there is a house and a barn on the right, the Long Path turns left into a field, and heads uphill.

0.90 Enter Patria State Forest. Head uphill, steeply at times.

1.25 Turn right onto a woods road. The woods road is sometimes used a snowmobile trail. In one hundred feet turn left uphill leaving the woods road. The trail continues uphill, with a break in the slope to the left.

1.70 The trail levels off, turns right, and crosses the ridge. After the ridge, turn left and descend on an old woods road toward Patria Road.

2.00 Cross Patria Road and descend through the woods to a stream. The trail turns left and heads uphill along the stream in a deep hemlock forest.

2.40 Turn right, cross the stream, and continue through a plantation of spruce and pine. After a short level stretch, the trail turns left and climbs steeply up the ridge. When the grade levels off, the trail turns right and crosses the ridge, following the edge of the reforestation area. At the east end of the ridge, the trail turns left and follows the east side of the ridge.

3.00 Cross Mallon Road and re-enter the reforestation area. There is a small parking lot here. The trail follows a woods road, crosses under a power line, and then turns right, leaving the road. The trail turns left and begins a gradual descent toward Pleasant Valley.

3.40 Cross a seasonal stream and parallel a rock wall, and an old property boundary, skirting private land.

3.85 The trail switchbacks to the right as it continues downhill on a moderate grade.

4.00 Turn left and descend steeply.

4.15 After crossing Pleasant Valley Stream on a bridge, the trail turns right onto the old Pleasant Valley Road for a short distance. The trail then turns left onto an old woods road.

4.40 Cross the stream on a bridge and ascend moderately, leaving the stream, and continue to follow the woods road through a pleasant hemlock forest.

5.20 The Long Path turns right to follow another woods road. As the trail reaches the crest of the hill, a woods road comes in from the right. The Long Path continues ahead over the crest of the hill.

5.40 Turn right, leave the woods road and snowmobile trail, and continue through a mixed hardwood forest and spruce plantation.

5.60 Turn right, and begin to descend through the woods, parallel to a rock wall. If you turn left instead of right there is a small parking area in about 200 ft.

6.00 Turn right and follow the abandoned Hardscrabble Road, continuing to descend. On the left is a reliable spring. In a few hundred feet, another abandoned road, now a snowmobile trail, comes in from the left near the site of an abandoned farm. The Long Path continues downhill along Hardscrabble Road.

6.05 The Long Path turns left off abandoned Hardscrabble Road and rejoins the snowmobile trail as it heads downhill.

6.10 The trail crosses a stream and continues to follow the snowmobile trail downhill along a rock wall. As the trail leaves State land, the snowmobile markers change from the round DEC discs to orange diamond-shaped markers.

6.70 Cross under a power line, then turn left uphill away from the stream onto a logging road.

6.90 The trail leaves the logging road on the right and turns downhill.

 

View of Vroman's Nose  View from Vroman's Nose

31.1 Vroman’s Nose. 2001 [HERB CHONG]                  31.2 View from Vroman’s Nose. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]


7.50 Enter an open field. The trail continues across the field with views of the Schoharie Valley and Vroman's Nose.

7.65 Reach Hardscrabble Road. Across the road is a large gray barn. Turn left on the road.

7.70 Reach NY Route 30 near highway marker 30/9502/1179. Turn left on Route 30 and follow it north.

9.20 Just before a NY Route 30 sign on the right near highway marker 30/9502/1195 on the left, the Long Path turns left and follows a red-blazed trail up Vroman’s Nose on a very steep grade. As there is loose dirt and scree here, it is suggested that you have very sturdy boots and carry a walking stick or ski pole for balance.

9.40 The trail reaches the top of the extreme grade, having gained 400 vertical feet in the last 0.2 miles. At this point the trail turns right and continues to climb the ridge at a more moderate grade. As the trail begins to level off, views of the Schoharie Valley open up through the trees.

9.50 The red trail ends at an intersection with the green trail. The Long Path turns right and follows the green trail up to the summit of Vroman’s Nose. There is a view to the right, across the Schoharie Valley to the Catskills. To the left of the view is a campsite.

9.65 The trail reaches the summit of Vroman’s Nose, with a spectacular view across the Schoharie Valley and Vroomansland south to the Catskills. This is a wonderful place to have lunch, rest and take in the sun. Locals have been taking the hike up here for over a hundred years, as is evidenced by the initials in the rock. In 2017, the Vroman’s Nose Preservation Corp donated this mountain to NYS DEC, it's preserved as a Unique Area. Although the route followed by the Long Path up the mountain is quite steep, the summit can also be reached by an easy 600-foot climb from the maintained parking lot at the base of the green trail on West Middleburgh Road. A very informative book on the history of Vroman’s Nose and its environs, written by Dr. Vincent Schaefer, the founder of the Long Path, is available at the Old Stone Fort in Schoharie. The Long Path continues along the green trail, following the cliffs, with spectacular views along the edge of the escarpment.

9.85 Reach an overhanging promontory, with views both up and down the Schoharie Valley. You can see north to the Village of Middleburgh and the cliffs of Middleburgh, where the Long Path continues north and east toward Albany County. Here the green trail ends and the Long Path continues on the blue trail that descends, sometimes steeply, through the woods.

10.15 The yellow trail, which leads to a parking area on Mill Valley Road, begins to the left. The Long Path turns right and continues to follow the blue trail downhill on an old road.

10.45 The blue trail ends at Church Street, just past a church and a house. The Long Path turns right on Church Street and follows it to Route 30.

10.65 Turn left on NY Route 30 and follow Route 30 for about a mile.

11.70 Cross the Schoharie Creek on the Route 30 bridge.

11.80 Reach the intersection of NY Routes 145 and 30 in the Village of Middleburgh. To continue on the Long Path, follow Route 145 east.

Capital District

These northern sections of the Long Path slope down from the edge of the Catskills into the Mohawk River Valley. The hills of the western sections give way to gentle rises and falls shaped by glaciers and water punctuated by sharp cliffs of escarpments formed by tilted rock layers. Most of the lands have been settled for a long time and have remained productive farm or forest. Much of the trail passes through nature that has been coerced by civilization to behave in certain ways, either by being farmed for generations, or used as a managed forest for the supply of lumber.

 

field

 Field near East Berne. 2001 [ED WALSH]

32. Middleburgh to Lawton Hollow Road

Features: The Cliffs of Middleburgh, Cotton Hill, Canady Hill
Distance: 10.60 miles
USGS Map Quads: Middleburgh, Schoharie, Rensselaerville
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

After leaving Middleburgh, the Long Path ascends the Cliffs. The trail route follows the edge of the cliffs, where there are spectacular views across and down the Schoharie Valley. Caution is required at all viewpoints, as they drop right off. Beyond the cliffs, the trail crosses the head of “The Gorge” and traverses through Cotton Hill State Forest and Dutch Settlement State Forest. The hike through Cotton Hill is a pleasant variety of trail and old woods roads. The forest varies from hemlock to red and white pine. As you enter each section of the forest, a climb to a high point is required. The Cotton Hill sections revolve around the northeast corner of Schoharie County. The section ends spectacularly after the trail crosses Canady Hill, with great open views to the Catskills and Partridge Run and Cole Hill in Albany County. The last mile of this section to the Albany county line is on Lawton Hollow Road. The eastern and western ends of this section follow private property, while the middle 5 miles are on state land.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 21 (Catskill). Take NY Route 23 west about 8 miles to NY Route 145. Take NY Route 145 west about 30 miles to the Village of Middleburgh. The trail section begins at the intersection of Route 145 and Route 30 in the Village of Middleburgh.

Parking

0.00 Village of Middleburgh (town park; elementary school). (Unlocated)
0.35 Straub Lane, at end of MT Path cul-de-sac. (Unlocated)
4.75 Durfee Road, in shale pit. (42.62752°, -74.28854°)
6.10 Treadlemire Road, at snowplow turn-around. (42.62352°, -74.27377°)
8.10 Cotton Hill Road (on shoulder). (42.62127°, -74.24890°)
10.50 Canady Hill Road (on shoulder). (Unlocated)

Camping

4.40 - 5.80 Cotton Hill State Forest is entered at mile 3.95, at first the the state land is thin strip of land. At around mile 4.4 the state land widens out to allow legal camping. Camping is allowed in the Cotton Hill State Forest 150 feet away from the trail, water and road.

6.30 Cotton Hill Lean-to, 0.2 mi east of Treadlemire Road.
Camping is allowed in the Dutch Settlement State Forest 150 feet away from the trail, water and road.

Trail Description

0.00 The trail turns east on NY Route 145 on the sidewalks through the Village of Middleburgh.

0.35 Past the blinking traffic light, the trail turns left from Main Street onto Straub Lane. Follow Straub Lane (which becomes MT Path) past the Cliffside Senior Apartments complex and several new homes toward the base of the Cliffs and cul-de-sac, where there is room to park a couple of cars.

0.75 From the cul-de-sac, the trail departs to the right on a dirt road to a shale pit on the left. The trail leaves the dirt road to the left for a steep ascent above the shale pit and enters a recently logged area, crosses several logging roads and continues to climb.  A lemon squeeze is encountered in the cliff to reach the top. (To avoid the squeeze, continue on the dirt road which swings around the cliffs and reconnects to the trail at the top.) Just below the lemon squeeze is an eastern cedar tree that has been dated to be about 500 years old, the oldest cedar in New York and maybe the whole Northeast.

1.10 Once at the top, the best views of the village, Vroman’s Nose and Vromansland are captured. Continue north along the cliffs on an all-purpose trail.

1.40 A four-way intersection is reached. The woods road to the right leads back down to the cul-de-sac via "The Gorge," making for a short loop hike. The LP follows on the level to the left and continues along the cliffs edge.

1.65 There are spectacular views across the Schoharie Valley all along the escarpment. The forest is mixed with hemlock, red and white pine, and some hardwoods.

2.05 The trail intersects a series of logging roads and turns right to “The Gorge” side on property owned by the Trail Conference.

2.15 At an oak tree with a carved arrow, the trail turns onto another woods road to the left and ascends.

2.40 The trail levels to reach a "T" intersection with an old snowmobile trail. Turn left and ascend the ridge. As it rises to the 1700 foot high point, the trail crosses an old logging road and connects with the main all-purpose ridge trail.

2.80 After some level ridge walking, the trail descends slightly passing an old flagstone quarry. Pass a logging road to the right and then one to the left. 

3.15 The LP turns right and leaves the ridge trail to descend to the head of "The Gorge." There is a quick right-left jog as the trail crosses an older woods road and continues to descend along a spring on the left and a recent logged area on the right.

3.50 The trail crosses three streams. Between the streams are views north through an open field.

3.75 Cross the third stream and ascend to the Cotton Hill State Forest through a logged area.

3.95 Reaching the state forest boundary corner, the trail turns left to follow a narrow strip of state land. On the left is an old “stump fence” that was constructed when the land was cleared many years ago.

4.30 Cross under power lines with a view left toward an old farmstead. The trail continues north through hemlocks.

4.75 The trail crosses Durfee Road. A shale pit parking area is to the right. Continue uphill through a red and white pine forest on the right and hardwoods on the left.

4.90 At the top of the hill, the trail bears right, connects with a woods road, and soon descends.

5.00 The trail “Ts” into another woods road and turns left. On the right is an old well that was built to be used by forest firefighters in the 1930's to fill their “Indian Fire Pumps” that they would carry on their backs. If the fire got out of control, the firefighters could seek refuge in the well.

5.10 The trail “Ts” into another woods road and turns right and descends to yet another “T”. Turn left and follow the road between stonewalls, passing a snowmobile trail to the right, to the state forest boundary and private property.

5.40 The trail turns right leaving the woods road and descends to a gorge. At the gorge edge, the trail bears left and follows the gorge through hemlocks ascending to Treadlemire Road.

5.80 Turn left and follow Treadlemire Road uphill passing several houses.

6.10 On the right is a small parking area and snowplow turn-around where the trail exits the back and enters the Dutch Settlement State Forest on a woods road.  In 300 feet, the LP turns left from the road to wind through a narrow crevice in a rock out-crop which resembles elephant skin. Linking back to the logging road, the trail turns left and ascends steeply. 

Cotton_Hill leanto

32.1 Cotton Hill lean-to. 2001 [ED WALSH]

6.30 The trail turns left from the logging road and follows a north-western escarpment to a lean-to with views to northern Schoharie County.

6.40 Cross Cotton Hill (a.k.a. Babcock 2) with an elevation of 2114 feet. To the left, about 52 paces, are the USGS survey monument and a radio/communications tower.

6.95 Descend along the north border of state land and turn left crossing a stone wall at the corner boundary. Soon the trail bears right, descends slightly, and then levels again.

7.40 Reach a woods road, turn right and emerge at an old farmstead clearing and a DEC access road. This road is the boundary between state land on the left and private land on the right.

7.80 A snowmobile trail comes in on the left. Continue straight and pass another firefighter well on the left; the road bears to the right to reach Cotton Hill Road.

8.10 Cross Cotton Hill Road and descend to the right and cross a foot bridge over a tributary of Fox Creek. Follow the stream down for a short distance and then climb the bank to reach an old woods road. Ascend to the right along this road through a white and red pine forest.

8.55 The trail leaves the road, turning right and climbing steeply. (Watch close for a big turn arrow.) At the top of the hill, the trail continues south along Cotton Hill’s eastern boundary. The trail soon begins to descend.

8.90 Before reaching another boundary corner, the trail crosses a DEC access road that leads out to Brooky Hollow Road. At the corner, the trail turns left and stays on the state land.

9.10 The Long Path bears right and descends along the state forest boundary. While descending the trail enters private land. Camping, fires, etc. are prohibited beyond this point.

9.30 Turn left. The trail crosses a small stream and levels out.

9.40 Cross another small stream and ascend steeply through the woods to a woods road, which is 100 feet below the top of Canady Hill. Turn right and follow this road.

9.90 The trail turns left off the woods road and climbs over the hill.

9.95 Continue downhill following the right side of a hedgerow, then crossing the hedgerow to reach a grassy field drive which leads out to Canady Hill Road.

10.30 This area is very wet during the spring, but unavoidable.

10.50 The Long Path turns right onto Canady Hill Road.

10.60 This section ends at the Intersection of Canady Hill and Lawton Hollow Roads. Continue south on Canady Hill Road to contiue on the trail. During hunting season this trail is closed, follow the old route below.

The below description is the route to be used when the trail is closed for hunting season.

0.00 Go left on Lawton Hollow Road and follow this road. There are views to the Catskills and Green Mountains of Vermont along the way.

1.05 Cross into Albany County, where this section ends. To continue, stay on Lawton Hollow Road.

33. Lawton Hollow Road to Switz Kill

Feature: Partridge Run Wildlife Management Area
Distance: 12.65 miles
USGS Map Quads: Rensselaerville, Westerlo
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

Section 33 of the Long Path mostly follows old ski trails and snowmobile trails through the Partridge Run Wildlife Management Area. The walking is not difficult and there is little elevation gain, just small ups and downs. The exceptions are at the beginning and end of the section, where the Long Path must climb up to the plateau of Partridge Run. The first 0.3 miles and the last 0.2 miles are on paved roads. The single foot-only trail section is at the very eastern part of Partridge Run. Some of the park trails are also accessible by vehicle, but are little used. The trail passes through many reforestation areas, primarily of Norway spruce and red pine. There are also several ponds and lakes along the way. Views are limited, but more numerous when the leaves are down. Because skiers and snowmobilers share the trails in the winter, there are a number of wet areas, particularly in the beginning of the section.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 22 in Selkirk. Turn right on NY Route 144 and go south to NY Route 396. Turn right on Route 396 and follow it 6 miles to South Bethlehem, where Route 396 ends. The road becomes Albany County Route 301 here. Follow Route 301 west another 6 miles to its terminus at NY Route 443 in Clarksville. Turn left on Route 443 and follow it 11 miles to the village of Berne. Continue on Route 443 another 3 miles to West Berne. In West Berne, turn left on Albany County Route 9. Follow Route 9 for about a mile until it makes a sharp left. Continue straight ahead on Bradt Hollow Road. Follow Bradt Hollow Road for about 3 miles, where it intersects Lawton Hollow Road. Turn right on Lawton Hollow Road and follow it for 1.55 miles to the intersection of of Canady Hill Road.

Parking

0.30 East shoulder of Canady Hill Road. (Unlocated)
2.30 Off Bradt Hollow Road. (42.58265°, -74.20622°)
6.35 Tubbs Pond. (42.56730°, -74.18128°)
7.10 Fawn Lake. (42.56185°, -74.16544°)
8.10 Partridge Run Road and Ravine Road (Albany County Route 6). (42.56118°, -74.15094°)
8.60 End of Partridge Run Road. (Unlocated)
9.70 Shale Forest Road. (Unlocated)
12.65 Switz Kill Road and Gifford Hollow Road. (42.57715°, -74.11854°)

Camping

Camping is allowed in Partridge Run, but only in the reforestation areas, not in the Wildlife Management Areas, and 150 feet away from the trail or water source. There is a new lean-to 150 yards straight ahead at the right turn to reach Gifford Hollow Road (11.45 mi).

Trail Description

The trail has been relocated and no longer follows the road in Albany County. Section 33 now starts on Canady Hill Road at the intersection with Lawton Hollow Road In .30 of a mile the trail turns left into the woods. Follow the aqua blazes which will lead you into the Patridge Run Wildlife Management Area. The beginning of this section is on private land and closed during hunting season. Please respect the landowners request. 

0.00 From the intersection of Lawton Hollow Road continue south on Canady Hill Road.

0.30 The Long Path turns left and enters the woods on private land. The trail follows a stone wall for a ways. (The trail turns into the woods before reaching Bassler Road)

0.50 The trail leaves the woods road, crosses a small drainage and then starts uphill through the woods.

0.85 Near the top of the hill the trail intersects a snowmobile trail and follows it for a short distance. The trail leaves the snowmobile trail and starts downhill.

1.40 The trail crosses a small drainage, turns left on an old road for a short distance, then turns right heading uphill.

2.10 The trail reaches the top of the hill and turns right.

2.30  The Long Path enters the Partridge Run Game Management Area, the boundary is marked with yellow paint. The trail turns comtinues straight on the Nordic ski trail, continuing straight ahead bordering an area that was clear-cut several years ago. Reach an intersecting trail and bear right. In a short distance another ski trail connects from the right. The LP leaves the ski trail on the left through a brushy area and into fairly open woods following stone walls and logging roads. The trail emerges back on the ski trail at the iron gate on High Point Road.

3.05 The trail crosses High Point Road, and then re-enters the forest following another Nordic ski trail. Shortly, the trail enters a 2010 clear-cut, swings east into a second reforestation area and then back south again. The LP avoids a wet area by leaving the ski trail to the left.  Cross an old stone wall to re-join the ski trail to continue.

3.55 The trail reaches a fork. The left fork heads uphill in the woods, while the Long Path continues to the right, following level ground. There is a beaver pond on the right in the distance. Shortly, the trail turns right, crosses the outlet of the beaver pond and enters a hemlock grove. The trail parallels the beaver pond through the hemlocks and then turns left, away from the beaver pond. The trail leaves the hemlocks and enters another spruce grove.

3.95 The trail leaves the spruce forest, crosses an open field, and then turns left on a gravel road that is marked jointly for snowmobilers and skiers. Pass a 2016 clear-cut to the right of the trail, then head generally downhill to the remnants of an old beaver pond, then heads uphill again.

4.20 The trail turns right on a snowmobile trail, continuing south along a stone wall and pass through another 2016 clear-cut area.

4.40 Intersect another snowmobile trail, turn left and follow the trail to Bradt Hollow Road.

4.50 Just before reaching the road, the LP turns right to stay off the road and descends slightly to a zig-zag crossing of the road to continue on a DEC access road.

4.60 Turn right on a snowmobile trail. The trail parallels Bradt Hollow Road for about a quarter of a mile, and then swings away toward the east, passing through a pine forest.

5.35 A snowmobile trail comes in from the right. The Long Path continues straight ahead. The LP avoids another wet area by skirting to higher ground to the right for a short distance and re-joins the ski trail again.

5.85 The trail turns left on gravel Beaver Road.

6.05 Turn right and follow a snowmobile trail downhill through a mature stand of spruce and pine.

6.35 Reach Tubbs Pond, turn right, cross the outlet of the pond to the right on a new foot bridge, and reach the Tubbs Pond parking area. The trail follows the cinder Tubbs Pond access road.

Tubbs_Pond

33.1 Tubbs Pond. 2001 [ED WALSH]

6.75 Intersect Fawn Lake Road, turn right and follow it as it parallels Fawn Lake on the right.

7.10 Reach the end of the road and Fawn Lake parking. The trail turns left on a woods road and descends along a gorge following Fawn Lake’s outlet stream. To the left are the remnants of a 1930s deer management area.

7.55 Reach a trail intersection. The trail to the left leads to White Birch Pond. The Long Path turns right, crosses a stream on a bridge, and heads east toward White Birch Pond Road.

7.80 Reach White Birch Pond Road and turn right.

8.00 The trail jogs left on Ravine Road (Albany County Route 6), then right on Partridge Run Road. There is room to park several cars.

8.30 A path leads right about 100 feet to a waterfall along the stream.

8.55 Partridge Run Road bears right and crosses the stream. The Long Path bears left away from the stream, reaches a parking and picnic area at the end of the road, then continues straight ahead through a gate on a gravel road. The trail passes a small pond on the right.

8.95 Intersect a snowmobile trail that goes left. Continue right on the gravel road, intersecting another trail in 500 feet. The trail left leads to Wood Duck Pond. The Long Path bears right.

9.35 Reach a shale road (Kingfisher Road), and turn right.

9.70 Turn left, reach a parking area and continue on a snowmobile trail.

9.90 Reach the crest of the hill and turn right to descend. There are views of the Blackhead Range here when the leaves are down. The trail swings left to reach the eastern escarpment, then left again to follow it.

10.25 Following Partridge Run’s eastern escarpment north, there is a view across Gifford Hollow to Cole Hill.

10.55 The trail bears left, switchbacks uphill beneath a rock ledge, then continues north on the escarpment.

10.80 Reach an old woods road and turn right.

11.10 The trail turns right on another woods road and descends down to a level area before climbing again.

11.30 Reach the bottom of the hill, turn right and enter a hemlock grove, gently climbing again.

11.45 Turn left on another faint woods road, leave Partridge Run and begin descending to the Switz Kill. The trail enters private property.

11.60 The trail turns right and descends through the woods. It emerges on an overgrown field and continues east, following a hedgerow. Watch for the blazes to be sure you are in the correct field. At the end of the first field, cross a stream in a hedgerow and follow the hedgerow across a second field.

12.25 The trail almost reaches the east edge of the field and turns right onto a field drive to reach Gifford Hollow Road. Straight ahead at the turn, about 150 yards, is a new lean-to built by Adam Forti from Boy Scout Troop 79 as an eagle scout project in 2011-2012. The fire place at the lean to was built by Eagle Scout Joe Staubach from Troop 79. The campsite is maintained by Troop 79 and the landowner.

12.45 Reach Gifford Hollow Road and turn left.

12.65 Gifford Hollow Road intersects Switz Kill Road (Albany County Route 1), where this section ends. Turn right on Switz Kill Road to continue.

The Long Path is closed through the private land during hunting season, Continue from the Albany County line as described below.

0.00 Turn left on Lawton Hollow Road and follow it to the Albany County line. 

1.05 There is a shale bank on the left, with room to park a couple of cars. This is the Albany county line. The trail heads east on Lawton Hollow Road.

1.55 The trail turns right on gravel Bradt Hollow Road and turns uphill. After about half a mile, the trail passes the Partridge Run boundary.

2.25 The Long Path turns right and enters Partridge Run Wildlife Management Area. There is room to park several cars here, but the parking area is accessible only during dry season. Just past the parking area, the Long Path follows a snowmobile trail over a knoll. The trail then descends into the woods following Partridge Run’s northern boundary. Continue left and follow the description from mile 2.30 above.

 

33.2 Lean-to at mile 11.45. 2012 [MARK TRAVER]

34. Switz Kill to East Berne

Feature: Cole Hill State Forest
Distance: 9.10 miles
USGS Map Quads: Westerlo
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

This section of the Long Path is a pleasant blend of ski trails in the state forest, road walking and woodland trails. The Long Path leaves the valley of the Switz Kill and goes along Willsie Road to the top of Cole Hill, where it follows a series of recently constructed ski trails through a mature forest. There are views from Cole Hill, and the trail passes several beaver ponds that have the feeling of the Adirondacks. Past Cole Hill, the Long Path goes along public roads, with a view of the Catskills in the distance. Upon reaching the Doppler weather tower for the Albany region, the trail reenters the woods and begins a gradual descent through land that was once farmed. The Long Path passes through a field, crosses Joslyn Schoolhouse Road, and descends through a pine forest. It then crosses Fox Creek and finally emerges on NY Route 443.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 22 (Selkirk). Turn right on NY Route 144, and continue south to NY Route 396. Turn right on Route 396 and follow it for 6 miles to South Bethlehem, where Route 396 ends and the road becomes Albany County Route 301. Continue on Route 301 west another 6 miles to its end at NY Route 443 in Clarksville. Turn left on Route 443 and follow it 11 miles to the village of Berne. About a mile west of Berne, turn left on Albany County Route 1 and follow it south about 4 miles to Gifford Hollow Road.

Parking

0.00 Switz Kill Road (Albany County Route 1) and Gifford Hollow Road. (42.57715°, -74.11854°)
3.10 Turnoff on right side of Irish Hill Road. (42.59720°, -74.11107°)
4.15 Willsie Road. (42.59349°, -74.10602°)
5.10 Cole Hill Road. (42.59456°, -74.09527°)
7.00 Woodstock Road at weather station. (42.58694°, -74.06354°)
8.50 Joslyn Schoolhouse Road (Albany County Route 14). (42.59818°, -74.051878°)
9.10 Stage Road, near the intersection with NY Route 443, about 0.1 mile east of the trail. ( 42.60218°, -74.04600°)

Camping

2.75 Camping is allowed in Cole Hill State Forest 150 feet away from the trail and from water.

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path leaves the Switz Kill Valley at the intersection of Switz Kill Road and Gifford Hollow Road and begins to climb following Switz Kill Road.

0.65 Reach Willsie Road, turn left and head uphill, following paved Willsie Road. Near the top of the hill, there is a view back to Partridge Run and the Catskills.

2.10 The trail reaches the southern boundary of Cole Hill State Forest and enters the woods on the left across from a small parking area. It proceeds westward, descending to a small stream and crosses it on a bridge. Beyond the stream, the trail ascends, gradually swinging towards the northwest and then turning to the north at the top of the slope. It then enters a reforested area and passes through alternate fields of pine and spruce, each separated by mixed hardwoods and stone walls. After the fourth stone wall, the trail turns right (east) on a fire access road to join a cross country ski trail.

 

bridge

34.1 Bridge in Cole Hill State Forest. 2001 [ED WALSH]

 

3.10 The trail crosses Irish Hill Road. There is a parking area at the north side of this crossing. The trail is mostly marked in the standard aqua paint blazes, but there are also DEC ski trail markers and red trail markers.

3.25 The Long Path reaches a 2015 clear-cut area and turns left on an intersecting trail. After a short distance, it turns right, crosses a stone wall, and follows the top of an escarpment.

3.45 Reach an overlook over the escarpment, with views west over the Switz Kill Valley to Partridge Run. Just past the overlook, cross another stone wall and turn left on an old woods road.

3.75 Reach the boundary of the state forest, where the trail turns right. Remain within the forest, as a woods road to the left leads into private property.

4.05 Begin to descend. Turn left on yet another ski trail, then turn right and continue to descend to Willsie Road.

4.15 Cross Willsie Road and re-enter the woods. In another 500 feet, the trail turns left, and then turns right to begin a series of  corduroy, stepping stones and a foot bridge.The trail begins a gradual ascent and turns left.

4.50 The Long Path passes through a deep forest known locally as the  “Avenue of the Pines.” At the far end of this forest, there is an opening in the woods, with a view to an abandoned beaver pond. This old pond is now a wetland filled with marsh grass.

pines

34.2 Avenue of the Pines. 2001 [ED WALSH]   


4.70 Reach another beaver pond in a beautiful pine forest, a wonderful lunch spot. Here, the Long Path turns left and crosses a substantial bridge. The scene here is quite reminiscent of the Adirondacks. Beyond the beaver pond, the trail climbs steeply to a hemlock grove, briefly turns left on an old woods road, and then ascends to Cole Hill Road.

5.05 Turn right and continue uphill on paved Cole Hill Road. There is a parking area here. In the future, it is anticipated that the Long Path will be rerouted through the woods in this area, but for the present, it follows public roads for about 2 miles.

5.45 Reach the crest of Cole Hill Road, with views south toward the Blackhead Range and Windham High Peak in the Catskills. As you continue on Cole Hill Road, the view opens up to include Mt. Hayden, Mt. Pisgah, Richmond Mountain, Ashland Pinnacle and Huntersfield Mountain, the route of the Long Path as it heads northwest from the Catskills to Schoharie County.

5.90 Turn left on Woodstock Road, with Woodstock Park, part of Camp Woodstock, a large private campground and RV park, to the right.

6.35 Pass the entrance to Camp Woodstock and Woodstock Lake on the right.

6.85 Filkins Hill Road goes off to the left. Continue straight ahead on Woodstock Road.

7.00 As Woodstock Road turns right, the Long Path continues straight ahead on a gravel road that leads to a weather station.

7.05 The trail passes the National Weather Service’s Albany Region Doppler radar tower on the right. This tower tracks and warns of severe storms. Vehicles may not be driven beyond this point. The Long Path descends from Stafford Hill on a narrow woods road, with a rock ledge on the left at the bottom of the hill.

7.35 Continue straight ahead on an older woods road, as the road that the Long Path has been following turns left. In 500 feet, bear right at a fork, and begin a gradual descent through dense foliage.

7.60 Reach an intersection, with a gravel road to the right, and a level ATV track to the extreme left. The Long Path crosses both roads and descends slightly to the left. If you are going in the opposite direction, continue straight ahead across the gravel roads. You will know that you are following the correct route if you pass between the “Posted” signs of two different landowners. After a slight descent, the trail bears right, following an old woods road.

7.75 The Long Path crosses a seasonal wet area on stepping-stones, and then turns left across level terrain. In 0.2 miles, the trail begins a gradual descent, and then intersects a stone wall that it follows downhill, descending more steeply.

8.30 Turn right on a gravel road that leads to the edge of a field. Cross the field and turn right, by an abandoned farmhouse, to reach Joslyn Schoolhouse Road.

8.50 Cross Joslyn Schoolhouse Road (Albany County Route 14) and re-enter the woods just below an open field. The Long Path sidehills through an old red pine forest, then turns left and descends sharply on an ATV trail.

8.70 The trail bears left off the ATV trail at the bottom of the hill and descends gradually in the woods along the edge of a field with an old stone wall on the left. The trail goes over the stone wall and continues to follow the edge of te field, with the stone wall now on the right.

8.80 The trail crosses back over the stone wall and continues to descend through a forested area with a slightly steeper slope.

8.90 The trail reaches a snowmobile bridge across Fox Creek and crosses the bridge, then turns left to skirt the edge of a field in a clockwise direction as it climbs upward toward NY Route 443.

9.05 At the top of the field the trail turns right for 300 feet to a field drive opening to reach NY Route 443. Once at Route 443 the trail turns left again and follows the road for about 100 yards along its shoulder, going northwest.

9.10 To continue, cross Route 443 and head uphill in a northeasterly direction along the left edge of a large field.

35. East Berne to John Boyd Thacher State Park

Features: Helderberg Escarpment and John Boyd Thacher State Park
Distance: 10.95 miles
USGS Map Quads: Westerlo, Altamont
Trail Conference Maps: None

General Description

This section of the Long Path starts pleasantly as it passes through farm country. The section begins where the Long Path crosses NY Route 443 and follows a grassy road past a farm house to reach Stage Road. For the next mile the trail continues though fields and forests until it reaches Sawmill Road. The trail then continues along local roads to John Boyd Thacher State Park. The Long Path follows a series of trails through the park, emerging on the cliffs of the Helderberg Escarpment at the overlook on the north side of NY Route 157. Here, there are spectacular views northeast into Vermont. This ridge is made up of a core of limestone in which were found many fossils during the early days of geology in the 1800s. These fossils are known worldwide for their sequence from the Silurian to the Devonian eras. Early studies in this area helped lay the foundations for modern paleontology and geology. The Long Path then turns north and descends on the historic Indian Ladder Trail under the base of the cliffs, then follows the western boundary of John Boyd Thacher State Park northward. It continues north through the park along a newly constructed ski trail, with the Helderberg Escarpment to the right. The Long Path climbs to the top of the escarpment and heads in a generally northwest direction through the woods. The section ends at the north end of the park in the parking lot off Old Stage Road.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 22 (Selkirk). Turn right on NY Route 144 and continue south to NY Route 396. Turn right on Route 396 and follow it 6 miles to South Bethlehem, where Route 396 ends and the road becomes Albany County Route 301. Follow Route 301 west another 6 miles to its end at NY Route 443 in Clarksville. Turn left on Route 443 and follow it west about 5 miles to the second intersection with Stage Road, 1.5 miles from the intersection of NY 443/85.

Parking

0.00 Stage Road, near the intersection with NY Route 443, about 0.1 mile east of the trail. (42.60218°, -74.04600°)
3.75 John Boyd Thacher State Park Ski Area on Beaver Dam Road. (42.63826°, -74.01515°)
4.65 Lower Paint Mine Picnic Area (about 0.2 miles off the trail). (42.65111°, -74.01632°)
5.45 Helderberg Escarpment Overlook parking area. (42.65248°, -74.01204°)
6.45 North end of Indian Ladder Trail. (42.65481°, -74.01787°)
10.95 Old Stage Road (limited). (42.68158°, -74.05442°)

Trail Description

0.00 The Long Path crosses Route 443 just east of the driveway of a private residence and heads uphill in a northeasterly direction along the edge of a large field. Soon the trail turns left, then right, to follow a grassy road which parallels the edge of the field. The trail climbs gradually and passes a farm house on the left when it reaches Stage Road.

0.10 The trail turns left and follows Stage Road until it reaches a hedgerow bordering a field on the left.

0.40 At the hedgerow the trail turns left away from the road and descends gradually north along the west side of a hedgerow. There is an expansive view west, across open fields, toward Cole Hill and the Schoharie Valley.

0.80 Bearing right through a gap in the hedgerow, the trail enters a young hardwood forest and turns gradually east (right). At a logging trail, it turns north (left).

1.00 The trail reaches Sawmill Road and turns north (left) on Sawmill Road, near its intersection with Stempel Road.

1.35 At the intersection with Long Road, the trail turns right and follows Long Road east.

2.40 Turn left at Elm Drive.

2.60 Bear right onto Bush Drive.

3.35 Turn right onto Beaver Dam Road (Albany County Route 303).

3.75 Turn left into John Boyd Thacher State Park.

panorama

35.1 Panorama from Thacher Park lookout. 2001 [HERB CHONG]

3.90 The trail turns right and follows a gravel park road.

4.35 A nature trail comes in from the right at the head of a ravine. The Long Path continues ahead, gradually descending on the left side of the ravine.

4.65 Straight ahead, the Lower Paint Mine Picnic Area and pavilion are 0.2 miles ahead. The Long Path turns right, crosses the ravine on a bridge and follows the lower part of the nature trail. In 0.1 miles the nature trail forks to the right; the Long Path forks to the left and passes through a dense hemlock forest.

5.10 The Long Path turns left and follows a woods road that leads into the Upper Knowles Flat Picnic Area. The trail follows the north edge of the picnic area, and then descends right on a gravel path to the paved access road. The trail then turns right on the access road to intersect Route 157.

5.40 The Long Path crosses NY Route 157 and reaches the overlook parking area. The trail turns left and follows the overlook along the edge of the escarpment. There is a spectacular view across the upper Hudson Valley to the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondacks of New York. At the end of the parking area, the trail continues to follow the escarpment fence through the woods.

5.90 The trail reaches a viewpoint over Mine Lot Falls, which plunges over the escarpment. Just past this viewpoint, the Indian Ladder Trail leaves to the right and descends to the bottom of the cliff. It follows the escarpment north under the cliffs and passes under Mine Lot Falls. The Indian Ladder Trail is only open from mid-May to late fall, as it is dangerous when there is ice. The Long Path follows the Indian Ladder Trail when it is open. If you follow the trail on top of the escarpment, the trail will pass another overlook and then pass over the head of the falls.

 

DSCN1775+40

35.2 Mine Lot Falls in the winter. 2001 [HERB CHONG]      35.3 Base of the Indian Ladder Trail. 2001 [MICHAEL WARREN]

 

6.45 The Long Path reaches the northern end of the Indian Ladder Trail. Pass the Thacher Visitor Center to reach the parking lot. Go along the edge of the parking area to the park entrance gate  where it crosses the guardrail and goes through a field behind the administration building.

6.60 The trail enters the woods and follows a newly constructed ski trail, which parallels the park road heading north. The Helderberg Escarpment is visible to the east of the park road.

 

35.4 Wildflowers growing near the ranger station. 2001 [LOREN DOBERT]

7.15 The trail skirts a pavilion near the edge of the escarpment and turns right onto a gravel road to the Hailes Cave Picnic Area overlooking the escarpment. At two stone pillars, it turns left onto a grassy road, with the escarpment to the right, then again turns left and follows a ski trail along the edge of two fields.

7.35 Halfway northwards along the edge of the second field, the trail turns right into the woods. Many narrow fissures, some very deep, crisscrossing the woods mark this section of trail. The trail parallels and then crosses a stone wall to reach an old woods road.

7.55 The trail turns right on the old road and enters the OSI Thacher Park Nature Preserve.

7.75 The Long Path turns left off the woods road to climb along a switchback to the top of the ridge and a junction with another woods road.

7.85 The trail meets a yellow-blazed woods road leads left in 0.3 miles to Ryan Road and a small parking area. The trail turns right and follows the crest of the ridge through a mixed forest of pine, hardwoods and low-growing juniper.

8.25 After reaching a cairn that marks the highest point on this trail section, about 1,410 feet, the Long Path descends gradually from the escarpment, staying near its edge.

 

View from John Boyd Thacher State Park

35.5 View from the escarpment in John Boyd Thacher State Park. 2010 [JAKOB FRANKE]


8.65 The Long Path reaches a junction with another trail (blazed white) and turns right, descending steeply to a gravel road used by hang-glider enhtusiasts to access a take-off pad at the edge of the escarpment. Turn left on the hang-glider road. (To reach the hang-glider launch site, continue straight ahead on the road at this point.)

8.85 The trail leaves the hang-glider road and bears right, circling a depression in the escarpment.

9.15 The trail crosses an old stone wall.

9.25 Reach the middle of an old juniper stand and turn right. The forest along the trail is laced with fascinating fissures caused by acidity eating away the escarpment’s limestone.

9.35 A red-blazed trail joins the Long Path from the left. Both Long Path and red blazes now mark the trail.  It is important to remain on the trail in this area, to avoid potential injury from stumbling into a fissure.

9.75 The trail reaches a point where it turns sharply left, heading west. Just ahead and to the right is an open 'High Point' viewpoint. To the right Mt. Everett in southern Massachusetts is seen peeking over the shoulder of the hang-glider opening. Panning north you will see Albany, Mt. Greylock, the Town of Altamont, and Vermont’s Green Mountains with Killington and Pico Peak prominent.

9.95 The Long Path crosses a white-blazed woods road. The Long Path continues past a stone wall to the left onto a segment of an old woods road, then bears left away from the woods road through mixed deciduous and evergreen forest, winding through several stands of hemlock.

10.25 The Long Path turns right, leaving the red-blazed trail, and skirts fields and stone walls on the left.

10.45 The Long Path crosses a woods road leading to a field on the left and then skirts the edge of the field.

10.65 The trail crosses a field and then re-enters the woods, passing through many stands of hawthorne bushes.

10.75 The Long Path parallels a stone wall, and then joins an old woods road that also leads to the ‘High Point’ overlook already encountered.

10.95 Reach a parking area off Old Stage Road marking the furthest extent of park property, and turn right.

This is currently the "End-to-End" end of the Long Path. The trail has been blazed across the Mohawk River to the Saratoga County line, and from there a route has been described to the Adirondacks blue line, but until more of that route is off-road those sections are not a requirement for the "End-to-End" certificate.

36. John Boyd Thacher State Park to Christman Sanctuary

Features: Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy’s Wolf Creek Falls Preserve and The Nature Conservancy’s Christman Sanctuary
Distance: 9.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Altamont, Gallupville
Trail Conference Maps: None

General Description

After leaving Thacher State Park, the Long Path follows paved roads to Wolf Creek Falls Preserve, where it follows trails for about one mile. The trail then goes back to local roads until it reaches Christman Sanctuary.

Access

From the NY Thruway North, merge onto I-87 N/I-90 E toward Albany/Montreal. Take Exit 1S toward US-20/Western Ave. Turn right onto US-20 W/Western Ave, and in about 4 miles turn left onto NY-146 W. Continue for 6 miles, and in Altamont continue on NY-156 W. In 1.3 mi turn left onto Old Stage Road. The trailhead parking is on the left.

Parking

0.00 Old Stage Road trailhead. (42.68158°, -74.05442°)
1.70 Lewis Road and NY Route 146 (limited). (unlocated)
5.10 Wolf Creek Falls Preserve parking area. (42.72155°, -74.08547°)
9.20 Christman Sanctuary parking area. (42.74317°, -74.12860°)

Camping

There is currently no camping available in this section.

Trail Description

0.00 From the parking area off Old Stage Road, marking the furthest extent north of park property, turn right. Descend gradually on Old Stage Road, with views across the valley of Altamont towards the hills just south of the Mohawk River.

1.00 Immediately after passing an old cemetery, turn right onto NY Route 156.

1.10 Turn left onto Lewis Road.

1.80 Reach NY Route 146 and turn left.

3.00 Turn right onto Bell Road (Albany County Route 261).

4.30 Reach Bozenkill Road (County Route 253) and turn left.

5.10 The LP reaches the boundary of the Wolf Creek Falls Preserve, which is owned by the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy.  After crossing a large culvert on the road, the LP turns right onto the preserve’s red trail. Several other unmarked paths intersect, but stay on the red trail. There are several small waterfalls in the stream on the right. The trail crosses Wolf Creek on a log bridge, with a rustic handrail. As you cross the stream, you will see, on the right, a culvert over which a railroad crosses. In another 250 feet, the red trail ends at a junction with the white trail. The LP turns left onto the white trail.  An interesting detour is to take the white trail to the right 150 feet to an old stone washing station where gravel was washed and loaded onto railroad cars on a siding.

lpg36 

36.1 Wolf Creek Falls. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]

5.40 The white trail ascends along Wolf Creek, passing several large waterfalls. The trail passes through a stone wall that marked the boundary between two “great lots” from the land grants of the 1700s.

5.60 Reach a four-way intersection. Here, the LP turns left onto the blue trail. Bear left at a Y-intersection, staying on the blue trail. 

5.80 Reach an intersection with the yellow trail. Turn left and follow the yellow trail south, crossing a “musical” bridge where you can tap out a tune on the foot treads. In 500 feet, reach Bozenkill Road and turn right to follow the road.

7.30 Turn right onto Colliton Road (also known as Ostrander Road) and then right onto Bozie Hollow Road. Pass the old Ostrander Cemetery on the left. There is little blazing from here to the Schoharie Turnpike.

8.40 Cross railroad tracks and the Albany/Schenectady County line, where the name of the road changes to Bozen Kill Road. The Bozenkill Falls can be heard through the fencing on the right.  A gristmill was once at its base. (DO NOT LEAVE THE ROADWAY  -  DO NOT TRESPASS OR YOU WILL BE ARRESTED)  The rail line was built by the Delaware & Hudson Railroad in 1863 and is now operated by SMS Rail Lines.

9.10 Reach the Schoharie Turnpike (Schenectady County Route 74) and turn left.

9.55 At the top of the hill, on the left, is the Christman Wildlife Sanctuary where a trail leads to the historic “Long Path Lean-to” at the base of a beautiful waterfall. It was built by the Mohawk Valley Hiking Club in the 1930s as a shelter for LP hikers. Mr. W.W. Christman, renowned as the “Poet of the Helderhills,” was highly  enthusiastic about the Long Path and owned the land which now comprises the sanctuary. Continue on the Schoharie Turnpike.

 christman

36.2 Christman Sanctuary. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE] 

37. Christman Sanctuary to Featherstonhaugh State Forest

Features: Christman Sanctuary, Featherstonhaugh State Forest
Distance: 10.00
USGS Map Quads: Gallupville, Duanesburg
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

From Christman Sanctuary the Long Path follows local roads until it reaches Featherstonhaugh State Forest. Along the way it passes through the Hamlet of Duanesburg. In Featherstonhaugh State Forest the trail follows ski trails and snow mobile trails, until it reaches Judith Lane.

Access

From the NY State Thruway (I-87 N) merge onto I-90 W. In about 10 miles take exit 25A and merge onto I-88 W toward NY-7/Schenectady/ Binghamton. In 6 miles take exit 24 toward NY-7/US-20/Duanesburg, then turn left onto US-20 E. Continue about 2 miles and turn right onto Schoharie Turnpike. The Christman Sanctuary parking area is on the left in about 3 miles.

Parking 

0.00 Christman Sanctuary parking area. (42.74320°, -74.12875°)
5.80 Schenectady County Forest trailhead parking lot. (42.80174°, -74.15425°)
8.00 Featherstonhaugh State Forest parking area on Lake Road. (42.81069°, -74.13476°)
8.50 Featherstonhaugh State Forest parking area at Tidball Road. (42.80926°, -74.12870°)
10.00 Featherstonhaugh parking lot on Judith Lane (limited). (42.81148°, -74.11646°)

Camping

9.00 Frosty Acres Campground at 1560 Skyline Drive. Follow Tidball Road 0.8 miles to the end, then turn left on Skyline Drive for 0.65 miles.
Camping in Featherstonhaugh State Forest is allowed, but subject to the standard DEC rules and regulations.

Trail Description

0.00 From the Christman Sanctuary parking lot turn left onto Schoharie Turnpike.

0.80 Turn right on Weaver Road (Schenectady County Route 152). Cross under I-88 to reach New York State Route 7.

1.80 Go right on Route 7

2.70 Reach the intersection with New York State Route 20 in the Hamlet of Duanesburg. There is a diner at the corner. Turn left on Route 20 and pass under a railroad bridge to reach Duanesburg Churches Road (County Route 127) on the right. James Duane (1732-1797), the founder of Duanesburg, is buried here in a vault under the church.

 lpg37 37.1 Duane's 1792 church. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]

3.95 Follow Churches Road north to Lake Road (County Route 88).

6.50 Turn right on Lake Road and continue east.

7.25 Pass a Schenectady County Forest parking area on the left.

7.65 Reach the western boundary ofFeatherstonhaughStateForest where the Long Path turns left into the woods. Reach a junction with a ski trail and turn right. Cross under a power line and at the next ski trail turn right.

8.25 Cross Lake Road. The Long Path follows the ski trail and bears left at the first trail junction. After crossing the third stream on a foot bridge, reach a second ski trail junction, then turn left to reach a snowmobile trail.

8.65 Turn right on the snowmobile trail that parallelsLake Road near a parking area. Before the snowmobile trail reaches a swamp, the Long Path heads left to reach Lake Road with a wide mowed bank. Follow the road bank to the junction of Lake Road and Tidball Road.

9.00 Cross Lake Road to the trail and state forest on the north side of the road. Reach a junction with a ski trail and turn left.

9.80 Reach another trail junction - left leads to a DEC dock with a view of the lake.

10.00 The Long Path turns right at the junction and ascends to reach small DEC parking area on Judith Lane. Canoes can be launched here.

lpg37 37.2 Featherstonhaugh Lake. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]

38. Featherstonhaugh State Forest to the Mohawk River

Features: Mostly road walking, Plotterkill Falls in the Plotter Kill Preserve, Lock #9 park on the Mohawk River
Distance: 9.7 miles
USGS Map Quads: Duanesburg, Rotterdam Junction, Pattersonville
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description 

This section is mostly road walking through scenic farm country. In the beginning there are several vistas of the Rotterdam Hills and the Helderbergs. During the first half of this route there are great views to the south and east of the Catskills, Berkshires, and confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson River valleys. The only off-road section the trail passes through is in the Plotter Kill Nature Preserve in the Town of Rotterdam, where a short side trip will lead to some pretty falls. Toward the end of this section the trail follows the Mohawk-Hudson bike path along the old Erie Canal for a while. Section 38 ends in the Canal Park at Lock #9 (currently closed), immediately after crossing the Mohawk River. The blazing on this section is sporadic.

Access

 From I-87 N/NYS Thruway, keep straight onto I-90 W/NYS Thruway. In 4.7 mi take exit 25; take ramp on right for I-890 toward Schenectady. At exit 2A, take ramp on right for Route 337 toward Campbell Road, then bear right onto Route 337 (Rice Road). In 0.8 mi bear right onto Putnam Road (County Route 54), and in 1.8 mi turn right onto Route 159 (Mariaville Road). Continue 5.5 mi, then turn left onto Lake Road (County Route 88). In 0.3 mi bear right onto Judith Lane, and in 0.2 mi arrive at the parking area of Featherstonhaugh.

Parking 

0.00 Featherstonhaugh Boat Launch Parking lot on Judith Lane. (42.81148°, -74.11646°)
6.40 Plotter Kill Preserve parking lot off Gregg Road. (42.84646°, -74.02944°)
9.70 Lock #9CanalPark. (42.87962°, -74.04102°)

Camping

Camping in Featherstonhaugh State Forest is allowed, but subject to the standard DEC rules and regulations.

Trail Description

0.00 Continue straight (east) on Judith Lane.

0.20 Turn left on Lake Road.

0.50 Turn right on Route 159 (Mariaville Road), and continue east.

2.70 Turn left onto Rynex Corners Road and in 100 feet turn right onto Gifford Road and driveway (#132 Rynex Corners Road).

3.00 The blazed LP trail leaves the town maintained road/driveway to the right, by the unmaintained section of the old town road, and descends toward the creek.

3.20 A few feet before reaching the site where the road crossed on a bridge many years ago, the trail heads left through the woods and parallels the creek. Just upstream from the bridge there was once a grist mill on this side of the creek and a saw mill on the other.

plotterkill

38.1 Plotter Kill. 2014 [JAKOB FRANKE]

3.40 The LP leaves the creek bank and climb a side-hill slope to the left.

3.50 Emerge at a T intersection of a well maintained pathway and turn right.

3.60 Turn right from the pathway and descend to the creek again. The trail passes a small foundation hole which was the site of a “spinney”, a little shack where a spinster lived for many years back in the early 1800s. Follow along the creek, then turning to the left, climb up to the ridge and reconnect to the pathway.

3.70 Turn right and continue on this pathway.

3.80 Cross two foot bridges to reach a stone wall which is the Gifford-Plotter Kill Preserve’s boundary. (The LP blazes end here and we now follow preserve blazing which is maintained by Schenectady County.)

3.90  Continue straight ahead to the intersection with the preserve’s Highland Trail and continue straight on the yellow blazed trail.

4.00 Following a zigzag, the trail turns left to reach the end of the yellow-blazed at the junction with the red blazed North Rim Trail. Continue straight on this red trail, heading NNE.

4.10 Pass the large waterfalls on the right. Use extreme caution in this area as many visitors have been injured here.

4.30 Reach another junction with the yellow trail. Continue on the red trail which swings to the left and ascends the rim of Rynex Creek. Start to descend by way of switchbacks to the creek. Follow the creek downstream to a shallow crossing just above the waterfalls. (There is no bridge here and the crossing may be impassible during high water events, use extreme caution here.)

4.40 Cross Rynex Creek and climb steeply on old steps to the ridge top and then start a steady descent.

4.60 Reach a trail junction from the right. Stay straight on the rim trail.

4.80 After a quick left-right jog, the trail crosses under power lines.

5.00 Continue to descend, cross an access road and follow the trail along the rim again.

5.10 Pass by a trail junction from the right which crosses the gorge to the south rim.

5.20 Pass by a yellow blazed trail on the right.

5.30 The trail bears left and crosses two small streams.

5.70 Pass under another power line.

5.90 Reach a trail junction on the left where a #7 sign is nailed to a tree on the right; leave the red trail, turning left onto a trail marked with red disks over white paint.

6.10 The trail swings left and in 200 feet swings back right to cross a foot bridge.

lpg38

38.2 Plotterkill Preserve trailhead on Gregg Road. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]


6.40  Reach another foot bridge and the Gregg Road trailhead parking area. Continue north by once again following LP blazes on Gregg Road past the intersection with Crawford Road, under the NYS Thruway and over the railroad tracks to a T intersection.

6.90 Turn left and continue west for a short distance on NYS Route 5S.

7.10 The trail turns left to join the Mohawk-Hudson Bike Path, which runs just south of the Mohawk River along sections of the old Erie Canal.

lpg38

38.3 Erie Canalway. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]


7.55 Turn right onto a paved road (Mabie Lane), which will lead the LP back to Route 5S.

7.75 Turn left onto Route 5S and cross railroad tracks.

8.20 On the right is the historic Jan Mabie House built in 1705, with two styles of early Dutch architecture. Enter the Hamlet of Rotterdam Junction.

9.10 Turn right on Spruce Street and left on Leonard Street to reach Bridge Street, NYS Rte. 103. Go right and cross over the Mohawk River/Erie Canal with the destroyed Lock 9 State Canal Park on the right.

9.25 Turn left on Riverside Drive.

9.35 Turn right onto Bridge Street (NY Route 103) and cross the Barge Canal Lock #9 Bridge over the Mohawk River.

9.70 Turn right into the parking lot and picnic area of Canal Park at Lock #9. This is the end of this section, and the starting point for the description of the Long Path in northern Schenectady County. It is also one of Vincent Schaefer’s original Long Path landmarks. (The park is currently closed because of construction. Instead proceed to the junction of Routes 3 and 5. On the other side of the junction is a Stewart's and the section temporarily ends there.)

 lpg38

38.4 Route 103 bridge across Mohawk River. 2013 [MARK TRAVER]

North of the Mohawk River

In these sections the Long Path still needs much work. The trail follows mostly rural roads, first through farmlands in northern Schenectady County and southern Saratoga County, later on through large wooded areas. The countryside is hilly most of the way, but when the Long Path enters the Adirondack Park and reaches the Northville-Placid Trail the terrain has become mountainous.

39. Mohawk River to Saratoga County Line

Features: Lock #9 park, Wolf Hollow, farm fields
Distance: 9.10 miles
USGS Map Quads: Rotterdam Junction, Pattersonville
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

Jim Schaefer has scouted a route through the back roads of the West Glenville Hills that features the beauty and vistas of the hill country. The route takes the hiker on low volume roads near several landmarks described by Vincent Schaefer. 

Access

Follow the NY Thruway (I-87) to I-90W. In Glenville take NY Route 5W to NY Route 103S. The entrance of Lock 9 Park in Rotterdam Junction is just south of the intersection, before the bridge. 

Parking 

0.00 Lock 9 Park near the intersection of NY Route 103 and NY Route 5. (42.87930°, -74.03993°) (under construction)
0.10 Stewart’s at the corner of Route 103 and Route 5. (42.88028°, -74.03968°)
1.90 Wolf Hollow (south end).
3.10 Wolf Hollow (north end).
5.90 Touareuna Road. (42.92920°, -74.08754°)

Camping

None

Trail Description

0.00 Lock 9 Park (Lock 9 Park is currently under construction but a Stewart’s Shop at the corner of Routes 103 and 5 has a restroom and room for parking).

0.10 Intersection of Route 103 and Route 5 near Lock 9 of the Erie Canal on the Mohawk River. Proceed west on Route 5 (turn left from Route 103). Hikers should walk on the far left shoulder facing traffic; this is a busy and dangerous road.

2.30 Intersection of Route 5 and Wolf Hollow Road (Schenectady County Route 59) . Turn right and proceed north on Wolf Hollow Road. This is Hoffman’s where an historic ferry crossed the Mohawk River. It also is the ancient site of the battle between the Iroquois and Mohican leaders, noted on NY State signs on the nearby Touareuna Road. A native village site sits atop the hill to the NE.

2.90 Reach Y intersection and bear left into Wolf Hollow. Wolf Hollow is closed to vehicles but is passable for hikers. The alternate route is to continue right (north) on Hoffman's Hill Road  Extension which is the signed detour for vehicles. The distance is nearly the same.

4.10 Wolf Hollow rejoins Hoffman's Hill Road  Extension. Bear left and continue on Wolf Hollow Road.

4.50 Reach intersection of Wolf Hollow Road and West Glenville Road (Schenectady County Route 40). Turn left and proceed west on West Glenville Road.

 

wolf hollow

39.1 Wolf Hollow. 2013 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

off-road

39.2 Off-road north of West Glenville Road. 2013 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

Off-road walk begins at mile 4.4. To drive to the other end of the off-road section continue for 0.7 miles on West Glenville Road and turn right onto Touareuna Road. In 1 mile the trail reaches Touareuna Road on the right. There is room to park a couple of cars here.

4.70 The Long Path turns left and enters a field on the south side of West Glenville Road. There is a turn blaze on a tree where the trail leaves the road. The trail continues west through the field generally parallel to the road.

4.90 The trail leaves the field on the south side of the road, crosses West Glenville Road, and enters the woods on the north side on an unpaved lane – blazes mark this crossing. There is a white Cape Cod house near this crossing point. Once off the road you see a trailer to the left. The trail forks several times - keep right each time.

5.25 A stone wall appears on the right. The trail veers left and enters a hemlock grove.

5.35 Leave the hemlock grove, turn right (east) and walk along the edge of the hayfield to the southeast corner. On a clear day there are pleasant views of the distant hills. Soon there is a large stone pile in the woods to the right. Turn left and follow the northern edge of the field, observing a stone fence on the right.

(Aside: There are several hayfields to be passed. There is usually a trail mowed along the edge. Since the farmer does not always mow exactly the same areas, some of the blazes may appear off the current trail. In consideration of the farmer’s kindness, do not cut across the fields.)

5.50 Turn right, cross a hedgerow and stone fence into another hayfield, and proceed northerly along the eastern edge. At the corner of the field, turn left (west) along a stone fence and woods on your right.

5.65 Enter the mixed woods just west of the northeastern corner of the field, following a narrow foot/horse trail. There is a wetland and small pond down the hill from the trail, a nice spot for a snack.

5.70 Cross a small stream on stones, entering a meandering trail cut through a very young woods and passing by another hemlock grove.

5.75 The trail passes by another small stream and reaches an area that was hit by a tornado. Most of the toppled trees have been salvaged and there is a fair amount of logging debris.

5.90 The trail reaches a woods road near the end of the logging area and continues on this road. Soon another woods road is crossed. Continue straight ahead; there is a stone wall to the left, then to the right.

6.05 Cross stone wall and continue. The stone wall is now to the left again.

6.10 Turn right at the next crossing of woods roads.

6.15 Turn left (west) onto a gravel road to Touareuna Road, where there is room to park a couple of cars. Do not block the gate!

This is presently the end of the off-road portion of the Long Path and the end of the blazing. Resume road walk.

6.20 Turn right (north) onto Touareuna road.

6.50 Intersection of Fairbanks Road (Schenectady County Route 44) on left. Bear right and continue east on Touareuna Road.

7.00 Intersection at Green Corners. Bear right at first intersection and continue approximately 200 ft to STOP sign. Go straight across at STOP sign and proceed east on Potter Road (Schenectady County Route 42).

8.30 Intersection of Potter Road and Hart Road. Turn left onto Hart Road and proceed north. There is a large white house with red barn on the left just before the intersection. There is a lot of open farm country here with scenic views in all directions.

9.10 Intersection of Hart Road and Western Avenue. Turn right at YIELD sign and proceed northeast on Western Avenue. The Saratoga County line is here. The trail description from here on is in Section 40.

40. Saratoga County Line to the Northville-Placid Trail

Features: Scenic road walks, farm country, mountain vistas, lakes.
Distance: 36.6 miles
USGS Map Quads: Pattersonville, Galway, Middle Grove, Porter Corners, Edinburg, Northville, Hope Falls, Cathead Mountain.
Trail Conference Maps: none

General Description

Jim Schaefer has scouted a route that connects to Lake Desolation, and eventually gets to the historic Batchellerville/Edinburg Bridge, thence into the Adirondacks proper. The route takes the hiker on low volume roads near several landmarks described by Vincent Schaefer.

Access

From I-87N (New York Thruway) follow signs to I-90W / NY Thruway, and take Exit 26 for I-890W to NY Route 5, then follow signs for NY Route 5W. In about 5 mi, turn right onto Wolf Hollow Road, and in about 2 mi, continue on Green Corners Road. In 1.4 mi, make sharp right onto Potter Road, and in 1.2 mi turn left onto Hart Road. In 0.8 mi is the junction with Western Avenue.

Parking

Ample parking along roads, in Lake Desolation, Batchelerville,  Edinburg, Northville, and Benson. Below are a few selected parking spots.

18.90 Gravel operation about 200 ft before Older Mountain Road. (43.12503°, -73.95140°)
24.10 Mulleyville snowmobile trail system on the right. There is room to park several cars. (43.17685°, -73.99109°)
36.60 Northville-Placid Trail (NPT) trailhead in Northville. (unlocated)
40.10 NPT trailhead at Collins Gifford Valley Road. (unlocated)

Camping

Lake Desolation State Forest between mile 21.6 and 22.5.

Trail Description

0.00 Intersection of Hart Road and Western Avenue. Turn right at YIELD sign and proceed northeast on Western Avenue, entering Saratoga County.

0.60 Intersection of Western Avenue and DeGraff Road. Turn left and proceed north on DeGraff Road. There is a farm at this intersection.

1.60 Intersection of DeGraff Road and NY Route 67 (Amsterdam Road). Turn right and proceed east on Route 67 – walk on the left side facing traffic.

2.15 Intersection of Route 67 and Consaul Road on left. There is a yellow ranch-type house at the corner. Turn left and proceed north on Consaul Road.

4.20 Intersection of Consaul Road and Kania road on left. Continue straight ahead – north – on Consaul Road.

4.80 Intersection of Consaul Road and West Galway Road (no sign). Turn right into the narrow road before the STOP sign and before the large red house. Proceed east on this narrow road which is paved starting from the intersection.

5.05 The pavement ends and the road surface becomes gravel near a large cream-colored house on the left. A “Seasonal Maintenance” sign marks the end of the pavement. Continue east on the gravel road (West Galway Road).

6.00 Reach NY Route 147. There is a large white house with red barn on the right before the intersection. To the left (north) is the Town of Galway. The post office is about 0.7 miles away and it is I mile to the Galway Market. Cross Route 147 at the intersection and continue east on Donnan Road.

7.10 Intersection of Donnan Road and Crane Road. Turn left and proceed north on Crane Road through mostly open farm country.

7.85 Intersection of Crane Road and Saratoga County Route 45. Continue across the intersection and continue north on Crane Road. There is a large brick house on the northeast corner of the intersection.

8.80 Intersection of Crane Road and Parkis Mills Road at STOP sign. Turn right and proceed east on Parkis Mills Road.

9.00 Intersection with Old Mill Road on right. Continue straight ahead on Parkis Mills Road.

9.30 Y intersection with Alexander Road.  Bear right and continue north on Parkis Mills Road. There is a brown house on the corner.

9.45 Y intersection with Cruthers Road. Bear left and continue north on Parkis Mills Road.

10.10 Intersection of Parkis Mills Road and Hermance Road at STOP sign. Turn right and proceed east on Hermance Road.

11.30 Intersection of Hermance Road and Jockey Street (Saratoga County Route 52) at STOP sign followed by a YIELD sign. Go straight ahead at STOP sign and at YIELD sign and proceed northeast on Jockey Street. Jockey Street is a busy highway - walk on the left shoulder facing traffic.

11.80 Intersection of Jockey Street and Shaw Road  – there is a white house on the corner. Turn right and proceed east on Shaw Road.

11.90 Y intersection of Shaw Road and Baptist Hill Road. Bear left and continue east on Shaw Road.

12.20 Welch Road on the left - continue straight on Shaw Road.

12.40 Stanton Road on right - continue straight on Shaw Road.

13.30 Enter Town of Milton from Town of Galway. Shaw Road becomes Grenell Road at the town line – continue east on Grenell Road.

13.70 Pass Grenell Cemetery on the right.

14.00 Intersection of Grenell Road and Armer Road. The name of Grenell Road changes back to Shaw Road at this intersection. Go straight across the intersection and continue east on Shaw Road. There is an older white house at the northwest corner.

14.65 Intersection of Shaw Road and NY Route 29. There is a large brown sign for Camp Boyhaven at the corner. Proceed straight across Route 29 and proceed north on Boyhaven Road. Pass Camp Boyhaven on the right.

15.55 Intersection of Boyhaven Road and Middle Grove Road (Saratoga County Route 21). Go straight across at STOP sign and continue north on Boyhaven Road, into the Town of Greenfield.

16.05 Intersection of Boyhaven Road and Young Road. Go straight across at STOP sign and continue north on Boyhaven Road.

16.80 Intersection of Boyhaven Road and Kilmer Road. Turn left and proceed north on Kilmer Road.

17.60 Intersection of Kilmer Road and Barney Road at STOP sign. Continue straight across to second STOP sign and onto Lake Desolation Road (Saratoga County Route 12). Proceed north on Lake Desolation Road. Vistas of Berkshires and Hudson Valley, otherwise deep woods.

18.90 Large gravel operation on right a couple of hundred feet before Older Mountain road. There is room here for parking. Continue north on Lake Desolation Road.

20.10 Reach Hamlet of Lake Desolation; Hoffman Road on the right with lots of mailboxes and home-made street signs. Pass Tinney’s Tavern on the left. Continue straight ahead on Lake Desolation Road and proceed north. Lake Desolation is along the road on the right. Some sections of the road are unpaved over the next several miles.

21.00 Pass North End Road on the right.

21.60 Enter DEC lands (Lake Desolation State Forest) on the left.

22.00 Plank Road (woods road) to the right. Continue straight.

22.50 The Long Path enters the Adirondack Park – the Park boundary is not marked by a sign. This also is the end of the State Forest.

23.00 Enter Town of Edinburg and leave Town of Greenfield – continue northwest. Lake Desolation Road has now become Fox Hill Road.

 

 Saratoga County      Fox Hill Road

40.1 Saratoga County. 2013 [JAKOB FRANKE]         40.2 Fox Hill Road. 2013 [JAKOB FRANKE]


24.10 Mulleyville snowmobile trail system on the right. There is room to park several of cars.

24.70 Small quarry on the right which is suitable for parking.

26.40 Parking area on the right in an area where there is active logging.

27.30 White church on left (Sacandaga Christian Fellowship). Continue northwest on Fox Hill Road.

27.40 Pass Adirondack Bible College on the right.

29.30 Pass Horse Hill Road on the right. Great views north toward the Adirondacks.

30.00 Intersection of Fox Hill Road and South Shore Road (Saratoga County Route 7). Turn left at STOP sign and proceed south on South Shore Road in the Hamlet of Batchellerville. There is a small grocery store on the left.

30.15 Intersection of South Shore Road and Saratoga County Route 98. Turn right and cross Great Sacandaga Lake on the 3000’ Batchellerville bridge.

30.85 Intersection of Saratoga County Route 98 and Wessels Road on the west side of the Sacandaga Reservoir.

31.35 Intersection of Saratoga County Routes 98, 4, and 5 in the hamlet of Edinburg. There are a store with deli and gas station, a diner, and the Edinburg Rural Museum at the corner. Turn right onto Saratoga County Route 4 (N. Shore Road).

31.50 The Nellie Tyrrell Edinburgh Museum is on the right.

31.65 County Route 4 turns right. Continue straight onto Military Road. The historical Barker store is at the corner, as is an historical marker for the Beecher store.

31.90 Turn left onto Airport Road.

32.30 Robinson cemetery is on the left. Soon you will pass an airfield on the left with good views.

32.60 Wheeler Road is on the left – continue straight.

33.10 Turn left onto Tennantville Road.

33.80 Turn right onto Johnson Road.

34.00 Turn left onto Tennantville Road. In about 200 ft you are entering the Town of Northampton in Fulton County.

35.40 Cross Ridge Road (Fulton County Route 149) onto S. Main Street Extension and enter the Village of Northville. There are a few stores, restaurants, and a gas station in town.

36.60 At 162 S. main Street, just before Bridge Street, is the entrance to Waterfront Park with the Northville trailhead of the Northville Placid Trail. See http://www.nptrail.org/

 

 

40.3 Trailhead of the Northville-Placid Trail  2014

 

The following is a description of the roadwalk from Northville to the new (2015) Collins Giffford Valley Road trailhead of the Northville-Placid Trail:

0.10 Turn left onto Bridge Street and cross the Sacandaga River

0.70 Western end of the bridge across the Sacandaga River. Turn left onto CR152.

1.80 CR152 turns left; continue straight on CR152A.

1.90 Cross NY Route 30. Continue on Mountain Road (CR123).

2.70 Turn right onto Collins Gifford Valley Road.

3.50 The new NPT trailhead is on your left.

Shawangunk Ridge Trail

The Shawangunk Ridge Trail was originally conceived as a relocation of the Long Path from Harriman State Park to Minnewaska State Park and envisioned following a portion of the AT in New York and New Jersey. Now part of the LP system, the SRT provides a backpack alternative to the Orange County route of the LP that has significant road walks and fewer camping opportunities. The SRT is co-aligned with the LP from Shin Hollow Road to the High Point Trail in Minnewaska State Park, and from there the SRT is co-aligned with various other trails through Minnewaska and Mohonk Preserve, until it reaches the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail.

 

Mount Hope

View from the Shawangunk Ridge Trail near NY Route 211 in Mount Hope. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]

 

 

 Click the graphic above to view this interactive StoryMap, or click here to view a full-screen version.

 

G1. AT in High Point State Park, NJ to Hawthorne Lake in Greenville, NY

Features: High Point, Cedar Swamp
Distance: 8.55 miles
USGS Map Quads: Port Jervis South, Unionville, Otisville
Trail Conference Maps: Online SRT Map #1 in PDF format, updated Huckleberry Ridge State Forest map

General Description

The Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT) begins where the Appalachian Trail heads east from the Kittatinny Ridge in High Point State Park in New Jersey. After leaving the Appalachian Trail, the SRT passes the highest point in New Jersey, where there is a spectacular view. The trail then continues through High Point State Park. A highlight of the trail is Cedar Swamp, which is a mountaintop cedar bog. In High Point there are three separate ridges; the trail uses all three. Past Cedar Swamp the trail ascends and crosses the border into New York, where it attains the westernmost ridge. The trail then follows the western ridge to Greenville Turnpike, and after a short walk on the Greenville Turnpike heads into the woods again. The trail follows public roads to pass underneath Interstate 84.

Access

Take Interstate 80 west to NJ Route 23 in Wayne. Take NJ Route 23 west to High Point State Park in northwestern New Jersey. Follow the park roads to the High Point Monument.

Parking

0.30 High Point Monument parking lot. (41.32358°, -74.65948°)
4.95 DEC parking area along Greenville Turnpike. ( 41.35904°, -74.64776°).
8.55 Cul-de-sac at end of Lakeside Drive. (41.37889°, -74.62034°)

Camping

Camping is allowed on DEC lands, at least 150 ft away from open water and the trail. DEC land can be found in Huckleberry Ridge State Forest from mile 4.95 to 6.00, mile 6.25 to 7.30, and past mile 8.55.

Trail Description

0.00 The Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT) begins in High Point State Park, where the Appalachian Trail (AT) intersects the Monument Trail. The AT turns right at this point and descends east off the Kittatinny Ridge. The SRT is co-aligned part of the way with the Monument Trail, which is marked with red and green squares on a white background. After leaving the AT, the SRT ascends through the woods, passing through a rocky area. The trail crosses the High Point Monument Road, turns right and climbs steeply on a gravel path to the High Point Monument. 

 

High Point Monument

High Point Monument. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]


0.30 The trail reaches the High Point Monument, the highest point in New Jersey. From this vantage point there is a spectacular 360-degree view. To the south you can see down the Kittatinnies across the Delaware Water Gap into Pennsylvania. To the west you can see across the Delaware River into the Poconos. To the northwest is the city of Port Jervis, with the Delaware River beyond. The Catskill Mountains are visible to the north, 70 miles distant, and to the northeast is a view all the way up the Shawangunks to Mohonk. To the east you can see into the Wallkill Valley, with the Taconics and the Hudson Highlands in the distance. The highlands of western New Jersey are visible to the southeast. You can take a trip up to the top of the High Point Monument, but it is not necessary for the view. Past the monument, the trail descends gradually to the parking lot. As it descends, the trail passes a park bench with a view across the escarpment to Port Jervis and the Delaware River. The trail passes a concession area with picnic tables. Beyond the picnic area is a public restroom with water fountains. After the restrooms, the trail reaches the parking lot and follows the western edge of the lot in a grassy area.

0.45 The trail reaches the end of the parking lot, goes around the end of the barricade, passes a picnic table and enters the woods between two boulders. The trail follows the ridge north through the woods.

0.95 A side path leads left where there is a view west toward Port Jervis and the Delaware River. Shortly, there is a path to the right to a rock outcropping with a view southeast toward northwestern New Jersey. The trail passes another view to the right and then begins a gradual descent to Cedar Swamp.

1.50 The trail reaches the northeast corner of Cedar Swamp. The Monument Trail continues straight ahead, crossing the outlet of Cedar Swamp. The SRT turns left and parallels the eastern edge of Cedar Swamp on a woods road. The blue SRT blazes begin here.

1.85 The trail turns right and crosses Cedar Swamp on a boardwalk. Cedar Swamp is a magnificent mountaintop bog that is filled with cedar, wild rhododendron and hemlock. Part of the Dryden Kuser Natural Area, Cedar Swamp is the most inland example of Atlantic white cedar, normally a coastal plain evergreen tree. It was named for New Jersey State Senator Dryden Kuser, a leading conservationist and the son of Colonel Anthony Kuser, who donated the land for High Point State Park to New Jersey in 1923.
In New Jersey, a natural area has the same protection as a New York wilderness area has. Normally a natural area is designated only in an ecologically significant area. After crossing Cedar Swamp, the trail continues along a woods road on the western side of the swamp.

2.05 The trail turns right off the gravel road at a park bench and ascends to the Monument Trail on the western side of Cedar Swamp. It then turns left onto the Monument Trail, which it follows to the top of a small knob. Atop the knob, the trail turns right, leaves the Monument Trail, then passes a view toward the Delaware River and descends off the knob. The trail continues north along the central of three ridges of Kittatinny Mountain through an understory of blueberry.

2.70 The trail turns left and descends on an old woods road toward a stream crossing in a col. After the stream crossing the trail makes a gradual ascent toward the New York border.

3.10 The trail leaves High Point State Park and crosses into New York by a border monument. After crossing into New York the trail is on private land. Please be respectful. The trail climbs up to the westernmost ridge and heads north along the ridge. Once in New York, the name of the mountain range changes from Kittatinny to Shawangunk.

3.25 The trail reaches a viewpoint west over Port Jervis and the Delaware River. The trail then heads north along the slab with a view north toward the Catskills. Shortly, the trail descends into the woods and then follows the ridge north. It climbs back up to an area of scrub oak and pitch pine, and then turns back north.

3.75 To the left, through the trees, is a view of the Delaware River and Port Jervis. The trail then begins a gradual descent off the ridge, crosses a woods road, descends to a small stream and levels out.

4.55 Turn right and follow Greenville Turnpike uphill.

4.95 Turn left off the Greenville Turnpike at a DEC parking area, onto an old woods road into DEC lands The trail is now blazed with blue DEC blazes most of the way. The trail passes between two houses and passes to the left of a blazed rock, then turns right.

5.60 Turn left on an old woods road, then soon turn right off it.

5.85 The trail reaches an open cliff with views of the Delaware River and the mountains of Pennsylvania beyond it. The trail starts descending.

6.00 The trail crosses a powerline, and soon passes near a parking area off Interstate 84 and begins ascending.

6.40 The trail reaches another fine viewpoint. Except for the highway noise, which depends on the wind direction, this section of the trail is very nice. The trail keeps ascending to the summit of a low peak, then descends into a valley.

6.80 Cross a seasonal stream. The trail passes by several stone walls and old woods roads, then climbs another summit (Minisink)  before descending again.

7.30 After a final steep descent reach Old Mountain Road and turn left.

7.70 The trail turns left on US Route 6 (to the right is a deli) and crosses under Interstate 84.

8.20 The trail reaches Hathorn Boulevard and turns right.

8.30 Hathorn Boulevard veers left but the trail continues straight onto Lakeside Drive along the eastern shore of Hawthorne Lake. On the right is Lookout Drive.

8.55 The trail reaches the end of the road and the end of this section. There is a cul-de-sac with room to park several cars, and the trail continues into the woods on an old woods road.

Hathorn Lake

 Hawthorne Lake. 2001 [JAKOB FRANKE]

G2. Hawthorne Lake in Greenville, NY to the Long Path

Feature: Southern Shawangunk Ridge
Distance: 2.70 miles
USGS Map Quads: Otisville
Trail Conference Maps:Online SRT Map #1 in PDF format, updated Huckleberry Ridge State Forest map

General Description

This section is a mixed bag of ridgetop hiking, an active rail line, and woods roads. This section begins at a cul-de-sac near Lake Hawthorne, from where the SRT heads north along the ridge through Huckleberry Ridge State Forest. There is one good view across Shin Hollow in this section. The trail then descends and parallels an active railroad, which it follows north for about 2/3 of a mile. The trail passes an abandoned bridge over the RR. The SRT follows an abandoned section of Shin Hollow Road, which is a nice woods walking section. Here the SRT joins the Long Path which reaches Shin Hollow Road from the east. The two trails will be co-aligned for the next 34 miles.

Access

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 16 (Harriman). Take NY Route 17 (future Interstate 86) west to Interstate 84 in Middletown. Take Interstate 84 west to Exit 2, Mountain Road. Turn left on Mountain Road and continue a short distance to US Route 6. Turn right on Route 6 west, cross under Interstate 84, then turn right on Hathorn Boulevard, and continue straight ahead to the end of Lakeside Drive.

Parking

0.00 End of Lakeside Drive. (41.37889°, -74.62034°)
2.35 End of paved Shin Hollow Road. (41.40448°, -74.61631°)

Camping

From Hawthorne Lake the trail passes through Huckleberry Ridge State Forest, where camping is allowed. Camping s allowed between mile 0.0 and 1.7, 150 feet away from roads, water and the trail.

Trail Description

0.00 The SRT starts at a cul-de-sac at the end of Lakeside Drive. There is room to park several cars here. The trail heads into the woods on an old woods road, turns left onto another woods road in about 150 ft, and immediately crosses a small stream The SRT is blazed with blue DEC disks.
A white trail continues straight ahead and will rejoin the SRT in about 1.5 mi.

0.20 The trail turns right onto another woods road. Straight ahead is a red-blazed trail (Lenape Ridge Trail) that will bring you into Port Jervis in approximately 6 miles. The SRT climbs steeply for a short distance, then levels out and follows the old road for a while before it turns left and heads into the woods.

0.60 The trail reaches nice open rock ledges, turns right, and continues north along the ridge, then slowly starts descending.

1.15 The trail crosses a stream and turns left on an old woods road that heads down the ridge. To the right is the white trail that goes around Huckleberry Ridge State Forest back to the cul-de-sac where this section started. In about 150 ft there is a short side trail, marked with a cairn, that leads to a nice fall (the fall only exists in wet weather).

1.40 To the left of the trail is open slab where there are nearly 180-degree views across the valley. Occasional pitch pines just barely cling to the slab. From this vantage you can see south to Port Jervis and the Delaware River with Pennsylvania beyond, west across Shin Hollow directly below and northwest across the Neversink Valley toward the Sullivan County Catskills. Just past the view the trail turns left and leaves the tote road, which is overgrown with blueberries at this point, and continues to descend through a switchback. It then heads north, gradually descending off the ridge.

1.70 The SRT turns right and parallels the Metro-North Railroad Port Jervis line. This line still sees daily passenger service to Hoboken. Soon after it crosses a seasonal stream and leaves the state forest.

 

Long Path Shin Hollow Railroad

Railroad tracks at Shin Hollow. 2022 [ANDY GARRISON]

2.35 The trail passes an abandoned bridge where Shin Hollow Road use to cross the rail line. The bridge across the tracks is a recycled turntable. Shin Hollow Road is paved west of the tracks and leads back to Port Jervis. The SRT continues north, following Shin Hollow Road, a woods road that is passable to jeeps heading to hunting camps along the ridge. The trail passes a hunting camp on the right.

2.70 After about a third of a mile the SRT joins the Long Path which reaches Shin Hollow Road from the east. The two trails are co-aligned for the next 34 miles.

Table of Distances

Sec. From To  Miles Cumulative
1 New York City (175th St Station) NY-NJ State Line 14.10  14.10
2 NY-NJ State Line Nyack   10.35  24.45
3 Nyack Long Clove   8.85  33.30
4 Long Clove    Mount Ivy   6.85  40.15
5 Mount Ivy   Lake Skannatati   9.40  49.55
6 Lake Skannatati   US Route 6  10.15  59.70
7 US Route 6    Woodbury 11.60 71.30
8 Woodbury    Heritage Trail in Monroe   8.85 80.15
9 Heritage Trail in Monroe   Heritage Trail in Goshen 11.40  91.55
10  Heritage Trail in Goshen   Mountain Road in Greenville  14.65  106.20
11  Mountain Road in Greenville   Basha Kill  11.90 118.10
12 Basha Kill Ferguson Road 10.50 128.60
13 Ferguson Road Sam's Point Preserve 10.90 139.50
14  Sam’s Point Preserve   Berme Road 11.55 151.05
15  Berme Road  Riggsville 12.30  163.15
16  Riggsville  Bull Run 10.10  173.45
17 Bull Run    Denning Road   7.60 181.05
18  Denning Road   Wittenberg Mountain   8.40 189.45
19 Wittenberg Mountain  Phoenicia    9.85  199.30
20  Phoenicia  Silver Hollow Notch  11.50  210.80
21  Silver Hollow Notch   Platte Clove Road 13.00  223.80
22  Platte Clove Road   Palenville   9.80 233.30
23 Palenville  North Lake State Campground    4.80  238.40
24  North Lake State Campground  Batavia Kill    9.80  248.20
25  Batavia Kill   NY Route 23   8.55  256.75
26  NY Route 23    Greene County Route 10   7.20 263.95
27  Greene County Route 10 S. Mountain Road in Conesville   7.10  271.05
28 S. Mountain Road in Conesville  West Conesville    9.50  280.55
29  West Conesville    Doney Hollow 13.55 294.10
30 Doney Hollow   West Fulton    8.60  302.70
31  West Fulton   Middleburgh  12.00 314.70
32 Middleburgh   Albany County Line 11.65  326.35
33 Albany County Line   Switz Kill 11.85  338.20
34  Switz Kill   East Berne     9.10  347.30
35   East Berne  John Boyd Thacher State Park  10.95  358.25
36 John Boyd Thacher State Park  Christman Sanctuary   9.55  367.80
37 Christman Sanctuary Featherstonhaugh State Forest 10.00 377.80
38 Featherstonhaugh State Forest Mohawk River   9.70 387.50
39 Mohawk River Saratoga County line   9.10 396.60
40  Saratoga County line Northville-Placid Trail 36.60 433.20
G1  AT in High Point State Park, NJ   Lake Hawthorne   8.55     8.55
G2  Lake Hawthorne Long Path   2.70   11.25

Backpacking the Long Path

Backpacking the Long Path

By Ed Walsh

 

Afoot and light-hearted I take to the open road,
Healthy, free, the world before me,
The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose.  Walt Whitman

This guide is written to assist hikers who wish to hike the Long Path from end to end in a single trip. It may also be useful to anyone planning a shorter backpack on the Long Path.

Currently an end-to-ender is supposed to have hiked all the sections from NYC to John Boyd Thacher State Park near Altamont. Although a route north of there has been described all the way to Sacandaga Reservoir, we do not yet consider it part of the official Long Path because it is mostly road walking.

It is now possible to backpack the entire length of the trail, but it still requires quite a bit of planning. It is not possible to camp out along the trail for its entire length. Some nights it will be necessary to hike to a motel or a nearby campground.

In Orange County the hiker has two options: the traditional route to Schunemunk Mountain, followed by significant rail-trail hikes and road walks, or the route from Harriman State Park along the Appalachian Trail south to High Point State Park in New Jersey. From there the Shawangunk Ridge Trail connects with the Long Path. The complete end-to-end route, following the traditional route through Orange County, is currently 358 miles long and includes approximately 60 miles of road walking.

The A.T./SRT alternative is only 5.8 miles longer, but has approximately 20 miles less road walking and also avoids a 9-mile paved rail-trail section. By taking the alternate you will be able to continue to find sufficient camping opportunities to within 15 miles from the end of the trail.

This section will tell you which sections of the trail are open for camping and will list facilities nearby where overnight camping or other accommodations are available for those sections where camping is not allowed. Just because a motel or campground is listed in this booklet does not guarantee its quality. The accommodations were chosen based solely on their distance from the trail. It is hoped that hikers will send reports on the facilities listed and these will be included in future editions of this guide. No reference is made to suggested tent sites where overnight camping is allowed. It is up to the hiker to find these on their own. Clearly a backpacker on the Long Path should have experience in map reading and a good “woods sense.”

This booklet does not give instructions on how to backpack. It is presumed that a hiker attempting to thru hike this trail in a single trip has some backpacking experience. However, due to its proximity to major population centers, the southern section is a good place to hone your backpacking skills.

Camping

Lean-tos or shelters located on the Long Path are three sided, open front structures with wood floors. They are usually buggy and almost all have resident mouse populations. In the Catskills, porcupines are a serious nuisance. They love anything salty, so hang your boots as well as your food. The Catskills, Shawangunks and New Jersey are also home to black bears. Although bears are usually not a problem, you should know how to protect your food supply. The shelters are all first come, first served up to capacity, usually 6 to 8 people. Groups of three or more should not use the shelters unless there is remaining room left in the late afternoon. They should be ready to make room for through hikers arriving late. Except for the Appalachian Trail section and the Catskills, shelters or lean-tos are rare. A tent is a necessity for backpacking this trail.

Although the Long Path passes through many State parks in its southern section, overnight camping is restricted to Cheesecote Park in the Town of Haverstraw (permit required), Harriman State Park (only within 100 yards of a lean-to), and the DEC lands along the Shawangunks.

Camping is allowed on State land in the Catskill Forest Preserve and in State Reforestation Areas as long as your campsite is 150 feet from any trail, road or water and below 3500 feet in elevation. Camping for more than three days in the same place requires a permit, as does camping with a group of ten or more. Permits can be obtained from the DEC. Only dead and down wood may be used for a campfire. A backpacking stove is highly recommended.

Overnight camping is not allowed on private property traversed by the Long Path. Permission to hike on these parcels was granted only after negotiations with the landowner. Please remember that you are a guest there. Do not do anything that might jeopardize these agreements. Campfires, horses, mountain bikes and motor vehicles are not allowed on private property crossed by the Long Path. Most of the private property is closed during big game hunting season. Some of this land is open for hunting, which usually extends from the Monday before Thanksgiving until the second week in December. For specific dates, write to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Fish and Game, State Campus, Albany, New York, 12226. The Trail Conference also maintains its own list of hunting seasons for areas under it’s purvey. Click here for more information. For your own safety do not hike on these sections during the hunting season.

Post Offices

The Long Path passes by or near 23 Post Offices. A list appears in the back of this chapter. Many long distance backpackers arrange a series of mail drops along the way by mailing food or supplies to themselves. This helps to lighten their load and allows the hiker to purchase his food in bulk and save money. The package should be addressed to the hiker c/o General Delivery with the words, “Hold for Hiker arriving on or about...” on the package. Post Offices are not obligated to hold these packages for more than 30 days, so if you are planning a long trip it will be useful to prepare these food drops ahead of time and have a friend or family member mail them to you as you hike. It’s a good idea not to seal these packages until they are ready to mail. Hikers usually find that they have packed too much food (or not enough) or have forgotten to include some useful piece of equipment. The Post Offices are usually open Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM and on Saturdays from 8:00 AM to noon.

How to Use This Guide

The sections listed here correspond to the sections in the online Long Path Guide. The distances given are south to north. If camping is not allowed on a section that cannot be reasonably hiked in a day, directions are given to the nearest public accommodation (campground or motel).

If using a motel or commercial campground, please do mention the Long Path when registering.

SECTION 1

New York City to Route 9W at Lamont-Doherty

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None.
Bus service to and from the trail is available for most of this section.

Lodging

There are many hotels in Fort Lee; the closest to the Long Path is an Econolodge (201-944-5332) located directly across the street from where the trail goes up the Palisades, north of the GWB. Of course, New York City is just across the bridge.

Food

There are many restaurants and stores located in Fort Lee. The closest to the trail is the G.W. Grill, next to the Econolodge. The gas station at mile 1.45 offers Dunkin Donuts, vending machines, telephones, water and restrooms. There is also food at the State Line Lookout snack bar (Lookout Inn) at mile 11.35.

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 2

Route 9W at Lamont-Doherty to Nyack (Mountainview Avenue)

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None.
Bus service to and from the trail is available for most of this section.

Lodging

Super 8 Motel 845-353-3880. Located right on the trail before it crosses Route 59.

Best Western Motel 845-358-8100.  0.50 miles east on Route 59.

Food

There is a snack bar and deli on the eastside of Route 9W in Palisades (0.95 mi).

The village of Piermont has restaurants and delis.

Near the intersection of Route 59 are a convenience store and a McDonalds.

0.05 miles east on Route 59 are the Old World Food Market, delis, Dunkin Doughnuts and Chinese restaurant. 0.75 miles east on Route 59 is the village of Nyack with many restaurants and food shops.

0.20 miles west on Route 59 is Alain's French Bistro (expensive but good!), and 0.60 miles west on Route 59 are a supermarket, pharmacy, deli and Chinese restaurant.

Post Office

Palisades 10964 - at mile 0.55 turn left onto Oak Tree Road for 0.10 miles.

Piermont 10968 - at mile 3.25, after crossing the Sparkill Creek, turn west (left) onto Piermont Avenue for 20 yards.

 

SECTION 3

Nyack (Mountainview Avenue) to Long Clove (Route 9W)

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None. Although the Long Path traverses much State land in this section, camping is not allowed. Ed & Eudora Walsh (845-429-8550) will allow through hikers to camp in their backyard if prior arrangements are made. Bus service to and from the trail is available for most of this section.

Lodging

Raintree Motel 845-268-5600. At mile 5.75, Rockland Lake Road, turn left for 0.20 miles past the firehouse, then right for 1.00 miles to Route 9W. The motel is across the street on the left.

Holiday Court Motel 845-268-3300. At mile 5.75, Rockland Lake Road, turn left for 0.20miles past the firehouse, then right for 1.00 miles to Route 9W. The motel is 0.20 miles north (right) on 9W.

Green Inn Motel on the Lake 845-268-6836. At mile 5.75, Rockland Lake Road, turn left for 0.20 miles past the firehouse, then right for 1.00 miles to Route 9W. The motel is 0.10 mile farther north on Route 9W.

Food

Near mile 2.1 are a convenience store and restaurants.
There are restaurants both north and south on Route 9W from the intersection with the park road at Rockland Lake.
From the northern end of this section there are a deli, laundromat, Dunkin Donuts, pizza restaurant, Chinese restaurant, and Rick's Club American, 1 mile south on Route 303.

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 4

Long Clove to Mount Ivy

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None. Although the Long Path traverses much State land in this section, camping is not allowed. Ed & Eudora Walsh (845-429-8550) will allow through hikers to camp in their backyard if prior arrangements are made. Bus service to and from the trail is available for most of this section.

Lodging

Rockland Motel 845-354-1373. 1.30 miles south on Route 202 (mile 6.80) in Mount Ivy.

Food

From the southern end of this section there is a restaurant, bakery and laundromat 1 mile south on Route 303.

0.20 miles west from mile 1.20 is a deli.

Along Route 202, which is 0.15 mile north of the end of this section, are several restaurants and stores. See Section 5.

Post Office

Pomona 10970. At  mile 6.85 turn right for 0.15 mi to Route 202, then turn left (west) onto Route 202 for 0.90 miles.

 

SECTION 5

Mount Ivy to Lake Skannatati

Lean-tos

Big Hill Shelter mile 5.80

Water is available at stream crossing 1 mile south on LP or follow LP to AT&T right of way, turn left and follow for 1 mile to Breakneck Pond.

Camping

In Cheesecote Park in the Town of Haverstraw camping is allowed with permit only (845-429-2200). The park is open from April 1 through November 30.
In Harriman State Park camping is only allowed within 100 yards of a shelter.

Lodging

Rockland Motel 845-354-1373. 1.30 miles east on Route 202 in Mount Ivy

Food

At mile 0.15, to the right (east) on Route 202, is a deli, restaurant, pizzeria, bank and laundromat.

At mile 0.20, about 0.1 mile straight ahead past the Parkway underpass, is a diner, and 0.40 miles farther west on Route 202 is a shopping plaza with a supermarket, pharmacy, bank, laundromat and restaurants.

Post Office

Pomona 10970. At mile 0.20 continue west on Route 202 for 0.80 miles.

 

SECTION 6-1

Lake Skannatati to intersection with the Appalachian Trail

Lean-tos

Cohasset Shelter mile 4.45. 0.85 miles past the intersection with the Appalachian Trail, north on the original Long Path. Shelter is made of corrugated metal, no water. Note that this shelter is primarily for the use of a girl’s camp. Be prepared to vacate if they request to use it. (To continue on the suggested route the hiker must backtrack to the intersection of the AT). Distance from Big Hill Shelter – 8.15 miles.

Fingerboard Shelter mile 1.50 north on the Appalachian Trail (please note that the LP follows the Appalachian Trail south here. To continue on the suggested route the hiker must backtrack 1.50 miles). Water 0.50 miles on blue-blazed side trail at Lake Tiorati. Distance from Big Hill Shelter – 8.80 miles.

Camping

In Harriman State Park camping is allowed only within 100 yards of a shelter.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 
Turn south on the Appalachian Trail which nearly parallels the Long Path to the Shawangunk Ridge.
It is 49.6 miles from this junction to the Shawangunk Ridge Trail.
By taking this route you will have continuous camping opprtunities from LP mile 42.75 at Cheesecote Town Park (which you already passed) to Cole Hill State Forest, which is 15 miles from the end of the trail.
 

LP/AT SECTION

Harriman Park to High Point State Park

Lean-tos

Wildcat Shelter. Water from a hand pump. Distance from Cohasset Shelter – 13.65 miles.

Wawayanda Shelter. 0.10 miles from the AT on blue-blazed side trail. Water available at park headquarters, 0.25 miles from the shelter on another blue-blazed trail. Distance from Wildcat Shelter – 12.00 miles.

Pochuck Mountain Shelter. 0.10 miles from the AT on a blue-blazed side trail. Water available from a spigot at a vacant house at the foot of Pochuck Mountain. Distance from Wawayanda Shelter – 13.00 miles.

High Point Shelter. 0.10 miles from the AT on a blue-blazed side trail. Water available from streams near the shelter. Distance from Pochuck Mountain Shelter – 12.30 miles.

Camping

none

Lodging

Tuxedo Motel 845-351-4747. 2.10 miles east on Route 17.

Breezy Point 2.00 miles east on Route 17A.

Appalachian Motel. 1.80 miles east on NJ Route 94 in Vernon, NJ.

Hostel. St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Vernon NJ.

Apple Valley Inn 973-764-3735. 1.10 miles west on County 517 in Glenwood, NJ Reservations requested at least one day in advance.

Backtrack Inn. 0.40 miles west on Lott Road in Unionville, NJ. Hostel with bunk space for 4 people.

High Point Country Inn 973-702-1860. 1.40 miles east on NJ Route 23.

Food

NY 17A, west 0.20 miles is Belmont Creamery (icecream); west 1.60 miles is a deli and pizza place. East 2.00 miles to Greenwood Lake with a supermarket, deli, restaurants and pizza.

Warwick Turnpike, 0.20 miles east is a farm market.

NJ Route 94, 0.10 miles west is a farm stand. 2.40 miles east is Vernon, NJ with supermarkets, restaurants, delis, and a laundromat.

County Route 517, 1.10 miles west in Glenwood is a farm market and deli. NJ Route 284, west 0.40 miles is a small grocery store.

Lott Road, 0.40 miles west in Unionville is a grocery store, restaurant and pizza.

High Point State Park, 0.60 miles from the park office is a swimming area and snack bar

Post Office

Southfields, NY 10975 - 2.10 miles east on Route 17

Bellvale, NY 10912 - 1.60 miles west on Route 17A, inside general store

Greenwood Lake, NY 10925 - 2.00 miles east on Route 17A

New Milford, NY 10959 - 1.80 miles west inside store

Vernon, NJ 07462 - 2.40 miles east on Route 94

Glenwood, NJ 07418 - 1.10 miles west on Route 517

Unionville, NY 10988 - 0.40 miles west on Lott Road

 

Shawangunk Ridge Trail

The Shawangunk Ridge Trail (SRT), blue blaze and part of the Long Path system, begins at the Appalachian Trail (AT) in High Point State Park, 0.60 miles from the High Point Shelter and where the Monument Trail crosses the AT. The SRT  and Monument Trail, which are co-aligned for the next 1.50 miles, turn right and in about 0.50 miles pass High Point Monument. Cross the parking lot and follow the SRT north. 1.50 miles from the AT, the SRT leaves the Monument Trail and turns left, paralleling the eastern edge of Cedar Swamp on a woods road. The SRT soon turns right and crosses the Cedar Swamp on a boardwalk. Thereafter the trail climbs to the ridge, crosses the Monument Trail, and heads north into New York State.

 

SECTION G-1

High Point State Park, NJ to Lake Hathorn in Greenville, NY

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is allowed in Huckleberry Ridge State Forest located at miles 4.95 to 6.00 and 6.25 to 7.30.

Lodging

High Point Motor Lodge 201-702-1860. 1.40 miles east on NJ 

Food

Mile 7.70 - Firehouse Deli - turn right and follow NY Route 6 downhill 0.15 mile to the next intersection, deli is on the left.

Post Office

None

 

SECTION G-2

Lake Hawthorne in Greenville, NY to Long Path

Lean-tos

None

Camping

From Hawthorne Lake the trail passes through Huckleberry Ridge State Forest, where camping is allowed.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

The next five sections are for hikers that plan to go through  the middle of Orange County rather then follow the alternate option of taking the Appalachian Trail to the junction of the Shawangunk Ridge Trail. Although the LP passes through State and County Parks, camping is not legal for the next 53 miles. Hotels are available in sections 7, 9 and 10. If you hiked the AT/SRT route the information you need starts with section 11.

 

LP SECTION 6-2

Intersection with the Appalachian Trail to US Route 6

Lean-tos

Mile 4.45 Cohasset Shelter (no water); mile 8.00 Stockbridge Shelter (no water)

Camping

None

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 7

US Route 6 to NY Route 32 (Town of Woodbury)

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None

Lodging

Mile 7.35: Americas Best Value Inn, 1.3 miles from the trail. Continue straight on Estrada Road, and in 0.7 miles turn left (south) onto Route 32. The motel is on the right in 0.6 miles.

Food

Mile 9.80: Continue straight on Pine Hill Road for 0.3 miles (the road changes to Park Ave when it crosses the creek). Turn right on NY 32, restaurants and a deli are on NY 32.

Mile 11.60: restaurant at 1 Quaker Road (Peppy & Eddy's - Italian food). About 0.25 mile south on Rte 32; turn right on Evans Drive, and immediately right again on Quaker Road.

Post Office

Highland Mills 10930. At mile 9.80 continue 0.3 miles on Pine Hill Road which changes to Park Ave when it crosses the creek. Turn right on NY 32, the Post Office is 0.2 miles on the left.

 

Section 8

NY Route 32 (Town of Woodbury) to Heritage Trail in Monroe

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None

Lodging

None

Food

Mile 0.00: restaurant at 1 Quaker Road (Peppy & Eddy's - Italian food). About 0.25 mile south on Rte 32; turn right on Evans Drive, and immediately right again on Quaker Road. More restaurants farther south on Route 32.

Mile 8.00: about 0.5 miles north along Route 208 is Rambler's Rest, a bar/restaurant.

Post Office

Woodbury 10930. At mile 0.00 go 1.5 miles south on Route 32.

 

SECTION 9

Heritage Trail (Orange County rail-trail)

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None

Lodging

Mile 4.15: Holiday Express (845-469-3000) - follow Route 94 south for 0.7 miles to Route 17M, then 2 blocks west.

Mile 8.50: Anthony Dobbins Stagecoach Inn (845-294-5526) - follow Route 207 north for 0.5 miles to 268 Main Street.

Mile 8.50: Comfort Inn (845-291-1282) - follow Route 207 about 1 mile south across Route 6/17, then turn right to 20 Hatfield Lane.

Food

Mile 4.15: there are restaurants, delis, and laundromat near the station in Chester.

Mile 8.50: there are restaurants, delis, and stores in the Village of Goshen.

Post Office

Chester 10918, at 76 Brookside Avenue - mile 4.15. Go 0.7 miles south on Route 94 to Route 17M, then 2 blocks west, opposite the Holiday Express.

Goshen 10924, at 20 Grand Street - mile 8.50. Take first right off West Main Street.

 

SECTION 10

Heritage Trail in Goshen to Mountain Road in Greenville

Lean-tos

None

Camping

None

Lodging

Mile 2.05: Days Inn (845-374-2411) - Follow routes 6 & 17M west for 0.5 mile, on the left.

Food

Mile 1.45: Mason's Marketplace (deli) and tap room is on the right. Mile 4.75: deli

Post Office

Mile 2.05: New Hampton 10958, at 5070 NY State Route 17M - Follow routes 6 & 17M west for 0.75 mile, on the right.

 

SECTION 11

Mountain Road in Greenville to the Basha Kill

Lean-tos

None

Camping

The trail passes through DEC forest parcels at miles 0.00-2.00 and 2.40-3.15, and at mile 5.65 more DEC land can be found east of the trail.

Camping is also allowed in the Gobblers Knob section (DEC land) between miles 8.40 and 10.20. The stream in this section is seasonal.

American Family Campground, Guymard Turnpike, Godeffroy, NY. 845-754-8388. Hot showers, pool, cabins, laundry. April 15 to October 15. At mile 3.65 turn left on Guymard Turnpike and cross the bridge. 1.80 miles west on the Guymard Turnpike, on the left. Caters mainly to RV’s. Distance from High Point Shelter – 16.70 miles.

Lodging

None

Food

Otisville 1 mile right on Rte 211. General stores, ice cream store, bar/restaurant, pizzeria

Post Office

Otisville 10963 - at mile 8.10 go 1 mile right (east) on Route 211.

 

SECTION 12

Basha Kill to Ferguson Road

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is allowed in the Wurtsboro Ridge State Forest between miles 6.20 and 10.20. 

Lodging

Mile 5.25 in Wurtsboro. Days Inn. About 1 mile from the trail, south on Rte 209. 845-888-2727.

Food

Wurtsboro, mile 5.25. Restaurants, deli. Supermarket about 1 mile from the trail, south on Rte 209.

Post Office

Wurtsboro 12790 - mile 5.35, on the trail.

The Village of Wurtsboro is a good place for a layover day. A motel, restaurants, supermarkets, and pharmacy are all within walking distance. You can also rent a glider at the nearby airport.

 

SECTION 13

Ferguson Road to Sam’s Point Preserve

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping on DEC land from mile 0.00 to about mile 6.45.

Mile 5.60: Spring Glen Campground is about 2 miles down the mountain, on Lewis Road. Tel. 845-901-1991.

Lodging

None

Food

Spring Glen Market is next to the Spring Glen post office.

Post Office

Spring Glen 12483. About 2 miles down the mountain from mile 5.60, on Old Route 209.

Cragsmoor 12420. About 2.20 miles from Sam's Point Preserve at the end of this section.

 

SECTION 14

Sam’s Point Preserve to Berme Road

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Mile 8.05, in Witch's Hole State Forest (NYDEC), about 0.5 miles west on Smiley Carriage Road. Camping is allowed 150 feet away from the trail and water. A stream is reached just as you cross into the state forest. If the stream is dry a reliable pipe spring is about 0.4 mile further down the hill.

Mile 11.45: John and Christy Adams - 0.45 miles past the end of this section - allow camping in their backyard if prior arrangements are made. Tel. 845-551-6858. Email: portbenfarm@mac.com

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

Cragsmoor 12420. About 2.20 miles from Sam's Point Preserve at the beginning of this section.

 

SECTION 15

Berme Road to Riggsville

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Mile 0.45: John and Christy Adams allow camping in their backyard if prior arrangements are made. Tel. 845-551-6858. Email: portbenfarm@mac.com 

Camping is permitted on state land along this section.

Lodging

Mile 1.4 - Colonial Motel in Kerhonkson - 1.1 mi north on US Route 209.

Food

Mile 1.4 - White Wolf Restaurant & Lounge in Napanoch - 0.8 mi south on Route 209 (open at 4.30 pm for dinner; closed on Mondays). Ricke Len's Country Restaurant & Pizza - 1.4 mi south on Route 209 in Napanoch, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Walmart Supermarket.

Post Office

Mile 1.4 - Wawarsing 12489, corner of Port Ben Road and Route 209, on the trail.

 

SECTION 16

Riggsville to Bull Run

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails. Water is available at Vernooy Kill Falls, mile 1.70, intermittently along the trail, and at Sundown.

Sundown primitive campsite is at the junction with Peekamoose Road at mile 9.65. No facilities. Water available from Rondout Creek.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 17

Bull Run to Denning Road

Lean-tos

Bouton Memorial lean-to - mile 5.20, 0.20 miles on a side trail. Water from a spring on the LP. Distance from Sundown – 5.20 miles

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 18

Denning Road to Wittenberg Mountain

Lean-tos

Terrace Mountain lean to - mile 8.40, 1.05 miles from the Long Path. No water available. Distance from Bouton lean-to – 11 miles

Camping

Woodland Valley State Campground 845-688-7647. Mile 8.40, May 15 - October 12, showers, flush toilets. Distance from the Long Path 2.75 miles.

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails. There are designated campsites between Slide and Cornell Mountains.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 19

Wittenberg Mountain to Phoenicia

Lean-tos

Terrace Mountain lean-to, 1.05 miles from the Long Path.

Camping

Mile 0.00: Woodland Valley State Campground, 2.75 miles from the Long Path.

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Mile 9.80: Black Bear Campground on Bridge Street in Phoenicia. Tel. 845-688-7405

Lodging

Mile 9.30: Phoenicia Lodge (Tel. 845-688-7772). About 0.7 miles west of the trail at the corner of Woodland Valley Road and NY Route 28.

Mile 9.85: Phoenicia Belle (B&B) Tel. 845.-688-7226. Turn left on Main Street for 0.1 miles.

Food

There is a grocery store, restaurants and pharmacy in Phoenicia. Brio’s Restaurant is highly recommended.

Post Office

Phoenicia 12464 – At the intersection with Main Street, continue straight ahead for about 75 yards. The Post Office is on the right.

Phoenicia is a good town for a layover day. Besides resupply, you can spend the day fishing or tubing on the Esopus.

 

SECTION 20

Phoenicia to Silver Hollow Notch

Lean-tos

Baldwin Memorial lean-to - Mile 3.20. Pipe spring, 50’ to left of trail. Distance from Terrace Mountain lean-to 14.05 miles. Tremper Mountain lean-to - Mile 4.00. No water. Distance from Baldwin lean-to 0.80 miles.

Camping

Mile 0.00: Black Bear Campground on Bridge Street in Phoenicia. Tel. 845-688-7405

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

Mile 0.00: Phoenicia Lodge (Tel. 845-688-7772). About 0.8 miles west of the trail at the corner of Woodland Valley Road and NY Route 28.

Mile 0.00: Phoenicia Belle (B&B) Tel. 845.-688-7226. On Main Street in Phoenicia, less than 0.1 miles from the trail.

Food

There are a grocery store, restaurants, and pharmacy in Phoenicia.

Post Office

Phoenicia 12464 - At the intersection with Main Street continue straight ahead for about 75 yards. The Post Office is on the right.

 

SECTION 21

Silver Hollow Notch to Platte Clove Road

Lean-tos

Mink Hollow lean-to - Mile 4.40. Distance from Tremper lean-to - 11.20 miles

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 22

Platte Clove Road to Palenville

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

Catskill Mountain Lodge 518-678-3101. Mile 10.00 - continue on Route 23A for 0.40 miles, then turn right on Route 32A for 1 mile. Motel and restaurant.

Clark House B&B 518-678-5649. Mile 10.00 - continue on Route 23A for 0.40 miles.

Food

Mile 10.00 - continue 0.20 miles to Palenville, which has a deli, and a general store with Coleman fuel available.

Post Office

Palenville 12463 - Mile 10.00 - continue on Route 23A for 0.30 miles.

 

SECTION 23

Palenville to North Lake

Lean-tos

None

Camping

North Lake State Campground 518-589-5058. Mile 4.80. 219 sites, showers, swimming. Reservations recommended. Distance from Mink Hollow – 24.90 miles.

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

Catskill Mountain Lodge 518-678-3101. Mile 0.00 continue on Route 23A for 0.40 miles, then turn right on Route 32A for 1 mile. Motel and restaurant.

Clark House B&B 518-678-5649. Mile 0.00 continue on Route 23A for 0.40 miles.

Food

Mile 0.00. Continue 0.20 miles to Palenville, which has a deli, and a general store with Coleman fuel available.

Post Office

Palenville 12463

 

SECTION 24

North Lake to Batavia Kill

Lean-tos

Batavia Kill lean-to. Mile 9.80, 0.25 miles on a side trail. Water available from stream. Distance from North Lake – 10.05 miles

Camping

North Lake State Campground. Mile 0.00. 219 sites, showers, swimming $16 reservations recommended. Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 25

Batavia Kill to Route 23

Lean-tos

Batavia Kill lean-to. Mile 0.00, 0.25 miles on a side trail. Water available from stream. Elm Ridge lean-to. Mile 7.40, water from a pipe spring 0.1 miles south. Distance from Batavia Kill – 7.40 miles

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails.

Lodging

Kopper Kettle Inn and Restaurant 518-734-3575. 2.50 miles west on Route 23.

Hamilton Motel 518-734-3190. 2.80 miles west on Route 23.

Hillside Mountain Inn 518-734-3668. 2.50 miles west on Route 23.

Food

Kopper Kettle. 2.50 miles west on Route 23.

Village of Windham, 3.60 miles west on Route 23 has restaurants, delis and a small grocery.

Post Office

Windham 12496 – 3.90 miles west on Route 23

 

CAUTION: Water is scarce throughout the next 3 sections, especially during the summer months.

 

SECTION 26

Route 23 to Greene County Route 10

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails. The first 0.75 miles of the LP in this section is on State land. The trail is on private property for the next 2.5 miles and camping is not permitted. Beyond that the trail enters Mount Hayden State Forest and remains on State land to the end of this section. Camping is permitted following the same rules as above.

Lodging

Kopper Kettle Inn and Restaurant 518-734-3575. 2.50 miles west on Route 23.

Hamilton Motel 518-734-3190. 2.80 miles west on Route 23

Food

Kopper Kettle. 2.50 miles west on Route 23.

Village of Windham, 3.60 miles west on Route 23 has restaurants, delis and a small grocery.

Post Office

Windham 12496 – 3.90 miles west on Route 23

 

SECTION 27

Greene County Route 10 to South Mountain Road

Lean-tos

Mile 5.25. Approximately 3 miles west on the red trail is the Hunterfield lean-to.

Camping

The first 0.55 mile are on private land, camping is not allowed. The remainder of this section is in a State Reforestation Area. Camping is permitted on State land at elevations below 3500 feet and at least 150 feet from water or trails. Distance between State lands – 10.10 miles

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 28

South Mountain Road to Conesville

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is permitted only on State lands at the beginning of this section. 

Lodging

None

Food

 

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 29

Conesville to Doney Hollow

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Nickerson’s Campground 607-588-7327. Mile 3.25, hot showers (coin operated), pool, laundry & store. Distance from Huntersfield lean-to – 11.50 miles.

Max V. Shaul State Campground 518-827-4711. Mile 8.70, 6.70 miles north on Route 30 from the intersection with Westkill Road. 32 sites, hot showers, flush toilets. Open mid-May through mid October.

Lodging

None

Food

Clarks Bar & Restaurant. Mile 0.40 on the right side of 990V.

Nickerson’s Campground - small store & ice cream

Post Office

Gilboa 12076 - Mile 1.60. About 0.15 mile left (south) on Route 990V.

North Blenheim 12131 - Mile 8.35 - about 0.2 miles from the trail.

 

SECTION 30

Doney Hollow to West Fulton

Lean-tos

Rossman Hill. Mile 5.85, water 100 yards in front of the lean-to from a well, may be dry in summer, fill up at streams before lean-to. Distance from Nickerson’s – 13.25 miles

Camping

Camping is allowed throughout the Eminence State Forest. Watch for private property signs toward the end of this section near West Fulton. Distance to State land from Nickerson’s – 7.10 miles.

Max V. Shaul State Campground 518-827-4711. Mile 8.40, 4.00 miles to the right on West Fulton Road and another 0.20 miles north on Route 30.

Water is readily available throughout this section. The streams at mile 4.10 and 4.55 and the well at mile 5.80 may be dry in summer.

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

West Fulton 12194 - Mile 8.70, turn right onto West Fulton Road for 0.20 miles.

 

SECTION 31

West Fulton to Middleburgh

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Camping is allowed in the State Reforestation Areas, 150 feet from trails or water. There is private property at the beginning and the end of this section.

Max V. Shaul State Campground 518-827-4711. Mile 0.00, 4.00 miles to the right on West Fulton Road and another 0.20 miles north on Route 30. It can also be reached by heading south on Route 30 for 3.00 miles from the intersection with Hardscrabble Road, mile 7.65. 32 sites, hot showers, flush toilets. Open mid-May through mid October.

Lodging

None

Food

Mile 8.70, 0.10 miles south on Route 30 is a farm stand. Mile 11.75, 1 mile north on Rte. 30 is a Grand Union supermarket. On Main Street in Middleburgh – Mrs. K’s Restaurant, Stewart’s & Red Barrel (not recommended, may not be friendly to hikers) on left, Hubie’s Pizzeria & Restaurant on right.

Post Office

West Fulton 12194 - Mile 0.00, turn right onto West Fulton Road for 0.20 miles. Middleburgh 12122 - Mile 11.75, follow the LP for an extra 0.15 miles.

 

SECTION 32

Middleburgh to Albany County Line

Lean-tos

Cotton Hill - Mile 6.75, no water at lean to. Get water at mile 6.15 at small stream just before crossing Treadlemire Rd. or at a pump (not reliable) on Treadlemire Road opposite a green barn (the pump may need to be primed). Distance from Rossman Hill lean-to – 21.40 miles

Camping

Camping is allowed in the State Reforestation Areas, 150 feet from trails or water. At mile 9.45, the trail enters private land. Distance between Patria and Cotton Hill State Forests – 9.75 miles

Lodging

None

Food

Mile 0.00 Middleburgh has delis, restaurants and grocery stores and a bank.

Post Office

Middleburgh 12122 - Mile 0.15 on the trail

 

SECTION 33

Albany County Line to Switz Kill

Lean-tos

Mile 11.45 - Lean-to is on private land, water from the creek below the Lean-to. Distance from Cotton Hill Lean-to here is 16.7 miles.

It is 20.45 miles from here to the northern terminus of the trail.

Camping

Camping is only allowed on the State Reforestation Areas in this section, not in the Wildlife Management Area. State Forest is reached at 3.60 miles and continues until the Long Path reaches Beaver Road at mile 5.05. Distance from Cotton Hill State Forest – 5.95 miles

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 34

Switz Kill to East Berne

Lean-tos

None

Camping

Cole Hill State Forest. Miles 2.75 through 4.75. Distance from Partridge Run Forest – 11.45 miles

Lodging

None

Food

None

Post Office

None

 

SECTION 35

East Berne to John Boyd Thacher State Park

Lean-tos

There is a lean-to in John Boyd Thacher Park but it is not available for overnight use.

Camping

The beginning of this section is entirely on private property and the end is in John Boyd Thacher State Park. Neither allows overnight camping. Camping is available at Thompson’s Lake State Campground, 4 miles from Thacher Park on Route 157. 518-872-1674. 140 sites, hot showers, flush toilets, swimming. Distance from Cole Hill State Forest – 11.45 miles

Lodging

Altamont Old Stone Inn B&B, 1160 Bern-Altamont Rd., Altamont. 518-861-0200.

Food

None

Post Office

None

  

Distances Between Accommodations

AT/SRT route

Miles

 

Orange County route 

 Miles

 

Fort Lee to Nyack

22.65

Motel

 

 

 

Nyack to Rockland Lake

 5.50

Motel

 

 

 

Rockland Lake to Mount Ivy

10.20

Motel

 

 

 

Mount Ivy to Big Hill shelter

 7.10

 

 

 

 

Big Hill to Cohasset lean-to

 8.15

 

 

 

 

Cohasset to Wildcat shelter on the AT

13.65

 

Cohasset shelter to Stockbridge shelter

 3.55

 

Wildcat to Wawayanda shelter

12.00

 

Stockbridge Shelter to Central Valley

10.60

Motel

Wawayanda to Pochuck Mountain shelter

13.10

 

Central Valley to Chester

19.55

Motel

Pochuck to High Point shelter

12.40

 

Chester to Goshen

 6.05

Motel

High Point to American Family Campground (1)

16.70

Fee

Goshen to American Family Campground

22.50

Fee

American Family Campground to Gobblers Knob (2)

 7.15

 

 

 

 

Gobblers Knob to Wurtsboro (3)

 9.30

Motel

 

 

 

Wurtsboro to Shawangunk Ridge State Forest (3)

10.30

 

 

 

 

Shawangunk Ridge State Forest to Witch's Hole (4)

14.25

 

 

 

 

Witch's Hole to Riggsville (5)

15.80

 

 

 

 

Riggsville to Sundown

10.10

 

 

 

 

Sundown to Bouton lean-to

 5.20

 

 

 

 

Bouton to Terrace Mountain lean-to

11.00

 

 

 

 

Terrace Mountain lean-to to Phoenicia (motel or campground)

10.90

 

 

 

 

Phoenicia to Baldwin lean-to

 3.15

 

 

 

 

Baldwin to Tremper Mountain lean-to

 0.85

 

 

 

 

Tremper to Mink Hollow lean-to

 9.80

 

 

 

 

Mink Hollow to North Lake Campground

24.90

Fee

 

 

 

North Lake to Batavia Kill lean-to

10.05

 

 

 

 

Batavia Kill to Elm Ridge lean-to

 7.40

 

 

 

 

Elm Ridge to Nickerson's Campground (6)

28.25

Fee

 

 

 

Nickerson’s to Rossman Hill lean-to (7)

13.25

 

 

 

 

Rossman Hill to Cotton Hill lean-to (8)

21.40

 

 

 

 

Cotton Hill to Partridge Run Reforestation Area

 8.75

 

 

 

 

Cotton Hill to Switzkill Creek - Lean-to on private land.

 16.7

       

Partridge Run to Cole Hill State Forest

 9.55

 

 

 

 

Cole Hill to Thompson’s Lake Campground

11.45

Fee

 

 

 

 

(1) Camping is allowed along the way in Huckleberry Ridge State Forest.

(2) Camping is allowed in Gobblers Knob.

(3) Camping is allowed anywhere in the DEC lands north of Wurtsboro.

(4) Camping is allowed in Witch's Hole, a DEC State Forest.

(5) Between Riggsville and Route 23 in East Windham the trail is in the Catskill Forest Preserve for almost 90 miles. Camping is allowed anywhere as long as you are 150 feet from trails, roads or water.

(6) Plenty of camping opportunities along the way in State Forests.

(7) The LP enters the Eminance State Forest 7.10 miles from Nickerson’s.

(8) Camping is allowed in the State Forests in this area.

Post Offices 

Palisades, NY 10964*

Piermont, NY 10968**

Pomona, NY 10970*

Southfields, NY 10975

Bellvale, NY 10912

Greenwood Lake, NY 10925

New Milford, NY 10959

Vernon, NJ 07462

Glenwood, NJ 07418

Unionville, NY 10988*

Woodbury, NY 10930

Chester, NY 10918*

Goshen, NY 10924*

Otisville, NY 10963*

Wurtsboro, NY 12790**

Warwasing, NY 12489**

Phoenicia, NY 12464*

Palenville, NY 12463*

Windham, NY 12496

Gilboa, NY 12076**

North Blenheim, NY 12131*

West Fulton, NY 12194*

Middleburgh, NY 12122**

 

No asterisk: more than 1 mile from the trail.

* Located within 1 mile of the trail

** Located on the trail

Transportation

Red and Tan Lines 845-356-0877

Bus service along Route 9W from Fort Lee to Haverstraw

International Bus Service 201-714-9400

New York City to Mount Ivy

Transport of Rockland 845-634-1100

Bus Service in Rockland County

Short Line Buses 201-529-3666

New York City to Mountainview

Adirondack Trailways Buses 800-858-8555

New York City to New Paltz and the Catskills

Addresses and Phone Numbers

New York-New Jersey Trail Conference
600 Ramapo Valley Road
Mahwah, NJ 07430-1199
201-512-9348
 
Palisades Interstate Park Police
845-786-2781
 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 3 Office - Ulster and Sullivan Counties
21 South Putt Corners Road
New Paltz, NY 12561
845-255-5453
 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 4 Office - Greene, Schoharie and Delaware Counties
1150 North Westcott Road
Schenectady, New York 12306
518-357-2234
 
New York State Campground Reservations
1-800-456-CAMP, or

Useful Publications

  • Fleming, June. The Well Fed Backpacker. Vantage Books, Random House, New York, NY, 1985
  • Fletcher, Colin. The Complete Walker III. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York, NY, 1984
  • Hampton, Bruce and David Cole. Soft Paths: How to Enjoy the Wilderness Without Harming It. Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA, 1988
  • Jardine, Ray. Beyond Backpacking, Ray Jardine’s Guide to Lightweight Hiking. AdventureLore Press, LaPine OR 97739, 2000
  • Manning, Harvey. Backpacking One Step at a Time. Vintage Books, Random House, New York, NY
  • Meyer, Kathleen. How to Shit in the Woods. Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, CA, 1989
  • Meyers, William J. Harriman Trails. A Guide and History. New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. New York, NY 1992
  • New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. New York Walk Book. New York, NY 1998
---------- Hudson Palisades Trails. map set
---------- Harriman Bear Mountain Trails. map set
---------- West Hudson Trails. map set
---------- South Kittatiny Trails. map set
---------- North Jersey Trails. map set
---------- North Kittatiny Trails. map set
---------- Catskills Trails. map set
---------- Appalachian Trail in New York and New Jersey. map set
  • Schaefer, Vincent J. Vroman’s Nose: Sky Island of the Schoharie County. Purple Mountain Press, Ltd. Fleishmanns, NY 1992.
  • Waterman, Laura and Guy. Wilderness Ethics: Preserving the Spirit of Wilderness. The Countryman Press, Inc. Woodstock, VT, 1993
---------- Backwoods Ethics: Environmental Issues for Hikers and Campers. The Countryman Press, Inc. Woodstock, VT 1993.

 

Feedback Needed!

Please help to keep this guide up to date by sending your comments, observations and suggestions to Ed Walsh, 11 Kwiecinski Street, West Haverstraw, NY 10993-1410 or by e-mail to [email protected]. Thanks and enjoy your hike.

 

 

 

Long Path End-to-Enders

Long Path End-to-Enders

1. Albert (Cap) Field, Astoria NY

 ?/?/19??

2. Edward J. Walsh, W Haverstraw NY

 7/04/1991

3. Stella Green, Woodcliff Lake NJ

 9/02/1991

4. Edward L. Walsh, W Haverstraw NY

 9/08/1991

5. Lanny Wexler, Syosset NY

 9/15/1991

6. George Form, Hempstead NY

 9/15/1991

7. Susan Gerhardt, Suffern NY

 9/21/1991

8. Peter Heckler, Oradell NJ

 9/21/1991

9. James A. Ross, New Milford NJ

10/06/1991

10. Roy Messaros, Franklin Lakes NJ

10/09/1991

11. John Golenski, Pearl River NY

11/17/1991

12. Arthur Schneier, Hyde Park NY

 5/14/1992

13. Mary R. Sive, Ardsley on Hudson NY

 6/11/1992

14. Arnold Projansky, New Paltz NY

 9/05/1992

15. Albert A. Mullen, Highland NY

 5/14/1992

16. Alan Gross, E. Swanzey NH

 1993

17. Alexander G. Gonzales, Dryden NY

 6/23/1994

18. Jack Hennessey, Naponoch NY

 7/13/1994

19. Joan D. James, Salisbury Mills NY

 7/13/1994

20. Herb Young Jr., Greenwich CT

 8/01/1994

21. Ray Cimera, Wayne NJ

10/01/1994

22. Dick Hearn, Kinnelon NJ

10/01/1994

23. Ferdinand Caiocca, New York NY

 9/26/1994

24. Dick Redfield, Riverdale NY

 7/23/1995

25. Eileen West, Pleasantville NY

 7/23/1995

26. Bill Pruehsner, Meriden CT

 5/27/1995

27. May Ann Pruehsner, Meriden CT

 5/27/1995

28. Barry Gold, Woodbridge CT 

 5/27/1995

29. Marsha Gold, Woodbridge CT

 5/27/1995

30. Maureen McCahery, New City NY

 4/19/1996

31. Abe T. Allen, Plymouth CT

 1996

32. Dean Guiliano, Olivebridge NY

 6/08/1997

33. Ernest C. Laug, Stamford, CT

 7/08/1997

34. Kathie F. Laug, Stamford CT

 7/12/1997

35. Margaret Freifeld, Mt. Kisco NY

 8/03/1997

36. Jane Smalley, Briarcliff Manor NY

 7/12/1997

37. Carolyn Harting, Bedford NY

 9/07/1997

38. Roeli Johansson, Bedford Hills NY

 9/29/1997

39. Mirjana V. Djordjevic, White Plains NY

 8/16/1997

40. Fran Levy, Hartsdale NY

 8/22/1997

41. Carole Ehleben, Bedford NY

 9/06/1997

42. June Fait, Long Beach NY

 7/29/1997

43. Virginia McMath, White Plains NY

 9/15/1997

44. Jack Barnes, Mohegan Lake NY

 9/15/1997

45. Barbro Thelemarck, North Salem NY

 9/06/1997

46. Julie Hobart, Bedminster NJ

 8/08/1997

47. Joan McNulty, Croton-on-Hudson NY

 9/06/1997

48. Carol Mantel, Amityville NY

 8/08/1997

49. Jean M. Dolen, North White Plains NY

 8/17/1997

50. Kathy Mario, Yaphank NY

 9/27/1997

51. Herbert J. Coles, Long Beach NY

 7/12/1997

52. Diane Bamford, Bedford NY

 9/06/1997

53. Carl D. Daiker, Middletown NY

 9/11/1997

54. David Zansalari, Bellefonte PA

 9/11/1997

55. James Shearwood, Long Island City NY

10/12/1997

56. Marry Ann Nissley, Chalfont PA

 5/31/1998*

57. Raymond S. Wilkin, Greenville SC

 5/16/1999

58. Donna L. Pasternak, Huntington WV

 9/22/1996

59. Richard Rapold, Maplecrest NY

 9/19/1999

60. Robert W. Novick, New Milford, NJ

 9/29/2000

61. Peter C. McGinnis, Poughkeepsie, NY

 9/30/2000

62. Henry C. Jenkins, Highland, NY

 9/30/2000

63. Rick Taylor, Hopewell Junction, NY

 9/30/2000

64. Alan Householder, Asheville, NC

 5/14/2001*

65. Joe Fennelly, Chesire, CT

 5/14/2001

66. Richard K. Greve, Mt Holly, NJ

 6/24/2001

67. Michael Hume, Peekskill, NY

 9/16/2001

68. Violet Davis, Unadilla, NY

10/19/2001

69. Kay Cynamon, New York, NY

10/20/2001

70. Roger Mailler, Holyoke, MA  

 6/19/2002*

71. Kent Bean, 

10/23/2002*

72. Kurt Ramig, New York, NY

 5/28/2003 

73. Lou Baldanza, Montvale, NJ

 5/23/2004

74. David O’Neill, Warwick, NY

 5/24/2005**

75. Bruce Borofsky, Montgomery, NY

 9/02/2005

76. Jane Restani,  New York, NY

10/09/2005

77. Jennifer Reidy, Larchmont, NY

10/09/2005

78. Patricia Johnston, Goshen, NY

10/09/2005

79. Nancy Lentner,Somers, NY

10/09/2005

80. Lilo Hackel, Mount Kisco, NY

10/09/2005

81. Fran Resch,Katonah, NY

10/09/2005

82. Wolfgang Weisbrod-Weber, Tarrytown, NY

10/09/2005

83. Silvana Leonard, Rowayton, CT

10/09/2005 

84. Diane Grunthal, West Milford, NJ

10/09/2005 

85. Allen Grunthal, West Milford, NJ

10/09/2005

86. Minu Chaudhuri, Ossinning, NY

10/09/2005

87. Henry Sengstaken, Butler, NJ

10/09/2005

88. Jason Boyd, Brooklyn, NY 

10/16/2004*

89. Deborah Magocsi, Brooklyn, NY

10/16/2004*

90. David Cole, Schenectady, NY 

10/27/2005

91. Tom Stellato, Woodstock, NY

 2/11/2006

92. Charles Lutomski, Woodstock, NY 

 2/11/2006

93. Ellen Cronan, Somerville, NJ

 5/28/2006

94. David Koehler, Claverack, NY

 8/05/2006

95. Stuart Levy, Old Brookville, NY

 8/05/2006

96. Chris Corte, New York, NY

 9/02/2006*

97. Andy Garrison, Wurtsboro, NY

 9/03/2006

98. Andrew Garrison, Wurtsboro, NY

 9/03/2006 

99. James Chambers, Williamson, NY

10/08/2006

100. Barry Cruttenden, Rochester, NY

10/08/2006

101. Harold E. Hill, Jr., Bronx, NY

10/08/2006

102. Carolyn Canfield, West Milford, NJ 

10/29/2007

103. James Canfield, West Milford, NJ 

10/29/2007

104. Elinor King, Westfield, NJ

10/29/2007

105. Hank Perrine, New York, NY

10/29/2007

106. Jim Dirlam, Brooklyn, NY

 5/17/2008*

107. Harold Herring, Reading, PA

 8/24/2008 *

108. Jacob Aronson, Tenafly, NJ

 7/6/2009*

109. Carlton E. Windle, Swansea, MA

10/09/2009

110. Frank Bradley, Albany, NY

10/25/2009

111. Steven Harty, Nassau, NY

10/25/2009

112. John Schmitt, Scottsville, NY

10/17/2010

113. Jon Meserve, Pembroke, MA

 5/25/2011*

114. Skip Doyle, Pleasantville, NY

 3/26/2012

115. Susan Pollack, Harrison, NY

 3/26/2012

116. James E. Bryden, Delmar, NY

 6/16/2012

117. Laurel B. Bryden, Delmar, NY

 6/16/2012

118. Michael Tironi, Chester, NY

 7/28/2012

119. Barbara L. Davidson, New York, NY

 8/29/2012

120. Eric L. Jackson, Delmar, NY

 6/7/2013 

121. Daniel J. Rosenthal, East Arlington, VT

 7/26/2013*

122. John Gormley, Midland Park, NJ

 9/14/2013

123. Chris Reyling, Hartsdale, NY

 9/14/2013 

124. Kenneth Posner, New York, NY

 9/3/2013** 

125. Philip Savoie, Hawthorne, NJ

 12/28/2013

126. Ray Savoie, Bloomfield, NJ

 12/28/2013

127. Michael Bullen, Paramus, NJ

 10/18/2014*

128. Brian J. Beauvais, Holyoke, MA

 5/11/2014*

129. Joanna Ezenga, Canaan, NY

 5/28/2014

130. Kristofer Petersen-Overton, Brooklyn, NY

 8/12/2014*

131. Chaim Wexler, New York, NY

 6/22/2014

132. Alexander Mackay, Mechanicville, NY

 10/14/2014*

133. Bernard Martoia, Rambouillet, France

 10/14/2014*

134. Ralph Bressler, Livingston Manor, NY

 12/27/2014

135. George Stanley Grzyb, Carteret, NJ

 7/5/2015

136. Pablo de Garate, Madrid, Spain 

 8/30/2015

137. Victoria L Cosentino, New Fairfield, CT

 8/30/2015

138. Timothy R Simpkins, Warren, CT

 8/30/2015

139. Tony Thomas, Fredericksburg, VA

 10/7/2015*
140. Cathe "Pounce" Neuberger, Bolton Valley, VT

 5/24/2016*

141. Todd Everleth, Delmar, NY

 5/29/2016

142. Ernest Cantrell, Staten Island, NY

 7/29/2016*

143. Ammon Dennis, New York, NY

 9/29/2016

144. Robert A Beaumont & Doodle, Valley Cottage, NY

 10/5/2016*

145. Ken Morgan, Highland, NY

 11/1/2016
146. Jakob Franke, Northvale, NJ

11/6/2016

147. John A. Papirio, 

11/29/2016

148. Franklin Marra

7/13/2017

149. Laura Smith

7/22/2017

150. David Booth

9/17/2017

151. Heather Houskeeper

10/17/2017*

152. Scott Weis

10/17/2017*

153. Joe Baldino

11/05/2017

154. Daniel Anderson

11/19/2017

155^. Will Fortin, New York, NY

06/09/2018**

156^. Dustin Smith, Charlottesville, VA

06/09/2018**

157. Mark Moroge

08/17/2018**

158. Jim Cowen, Larchmont, NY

10/11/2018

159. Steve Welgoss, New York, NY

11/05/2018

160. Elizabeth McDonald, Congers, NY

11/17/2018

161. Johnny Witter, New Paltz, NY

12/09/2018

162. Brian Bacher, Cornwall, NY

12/29/2018

163. Andrew Ferguson, Washingtonville, NY

12/29/2018

164. Brian Lubert, Hawthorne, NJ

12/29/2018

165. Mark Jones 

04/27/2019

166. Charles Deck

05/30/2019

167. Maya Gonzales Berry

06/25/2019

168. Mark Schmidt

06/25/2019

169. Sue Jordan

07/24/2019

170. Bryce Hopper

07/25/2019*

171. Donald Hopper

07/25/2019*

172. Eric Adams

08/28/2019*

173. Stephanie Langner 

09/02/2019

174. Moe Lemire

09/13/2019*

175. Jeffrey Adams

09/18/2019**^

176. Ralph Keating

10/01/2019

177. Alex McClain

10/26/2019

178. Geoffrey F. Wilk

11/16/2019

179. Patricia Malodobry

06/26/2020

180. Jeff "Tinman" Sargent

07/04/2020*

181. Thomas Walsh

07/04/2020*

182. Kenton Matthaei

08/12/2020*

183. Marek Rygielski

09/20/2020*

184. Brian Ibbs

11/11/2020

185. Heather M. Post

11/11/2020

186. Anna Quell

11/27/2020

187. Jeffrey Quell

11/27/2020

188. Rob Taylor

12/05/2020

189. Jill Moretto

12/05/2020

190. Kylie Yang

01/03/2021

191. Dennis Brown, Tuxedo, NY

04/18/2021

192. George Miller, Englewood, NJ

05/11/2021

193. Grace Gargiulo, Nesconset, NY

5/23/2021

194. Michael C. Kaiser, Patchogue, NY

5/23/2021

195. Shayli Geis, Tenafly, NJ

6/6/2021

196. Jonathan Geis, Tenafly, NJ

6/6/2021

197. Lisa Croote, Middleburgh, NY

6/12/2021

198. Russ Dresher, Berlin MA

6/26/2021

199. Scott Vonderheide, Alfred, NY 

7/3/2021

200. Joshua Naylor "Snailor", Vestal, NY

8/15/2021

201. Ronald A Hahn, New York, NY

8/17/2021

202. Charles Gadol, Highland, NY

8/28/2021

203. Shaun Gitlin, Brooklyn, NY

10/7/2021*

204. Krista Thomas, Guilderland, NY

10/10/2021

205. Barbara Evans, Ardsley, NY

10/17/2021

206. Daniel Fitzgerald, Kingston, NY

10/17/2021

207. Glenn Gross, Warren, NJ

11/5/2021

208. John Rushman, Florham Park, NJ

11/5/2021

209. Karl "Hungus" Weiss, Wharton, NJ

11/11/2021

210. Jeffrey A Levitt, Albany, NY

12/15/2021

211. Sandra Baldanza - Galindo, Paramus, NJ

12/16/2021

212. Jordan Vogel, New City, NY

12/19/2021

 

 

*   Completed the hike in a single backpack trip.

** Trail runner.

^ Current record holder.

Fastest known time is 7 days 12 hours 18 minutes and 40 seconds.