Other

Croton Gorge Park

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
Spillway at the New Croton Dam Photo: Jane Daniels
NYNJTC maintained: 
0
The massive dam at the entrance to Croton Gorge Park never fails to impress whether there is a delicate trickle barely covering the ledges or water roaring down the spillway. Sometimes visitors are treated to a rainbow. 
Hiking
Dogs on leash
1 miles
97 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.226248, -73.85749
Croton on Hudson
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park
The impressive New Croton Dam towers about 200 feet above grassy fields and picnic areas. The dam, also called the Cornell Dam, because it was built on property purchased from A.B. Cornell in 1893. It was completed in 1907.  

An unmarked trail wanders along the Croton River. Several longer trails start at the pak.  The Briarcliff-Peekskill Trailway crosses the top of the dam. Two side trails on the River Trail connect to the Old Croton Aqueduct.

From Route 9, take the Croton Avenue Exit. At the end of the ramp, turn away from the river. Head uphill towards a traffic light at a T junction with South
Riverside Avenue/Route 9A (not labeled) and turn left. Go 0.6 mile to turn right at Route 129 and continue 2.2 miles to the park entrance to the right. 
 
Alternately, from the Taconic State Parkway take the Underhill Avenue Exit and head west toward Croton. Underhill Avenue ends at a T junction with Route 129. Turn right and go 3.4 miles to the park entrance to the left, which is downhill from the road over the New Croton Dam (closed to vehicles).
 
No public transportation.
Westchester County
Landowner: 
County
Manager: 
Westchester County Parks
Park ID: 
421
Region - Maintenance: 

Muscoot Farm

Historic: 
Complete: 
No
Hiking along the yellow-white trail in Muscoot Farm Photo: Jane Daniels
Extra Pictures: 
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
A sign on Route 100 in Somers doesn’t begin to reveal what is in store for visitors at Muscoot Farm. It is a museum, education center and host to miles of old farm roads and blazed trails, as well as a
demonstration farm.
Hiking
No dogs
6 miles
777 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.259981, -73.725502
Somers
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park
The animals at Muscoot Farm are typical of the animals that would have been found at a gentleman’s farm in the early twentieth century. There are a variety of domestic animals: fowl, cows, sheep, horses, donkeys, and goats, many of which are unusual or rare breeds. Children may be disappointed by not being able to touch or feed them.
 
The trails at Muscoot Farm follow rolling hills, sometimes in the woods, at other times across former farm fields. Several unmarked trails head towards the Muscoot River. Although there are no viewpoints along the wooded trails and farm roads, several open fields with expansive vistas of the surrounding forest are a short
distance from the farm proper. With sufficient snow cover, the fields are ideal for cross-country skiing.
From I-684 take Exit 6 (NY 35) and head west. At Route 100, turn left and go 1.5 miles to the farm. The gate is locked at 4 pm, so plan accordingly
 
No public transportation available
 
 
Westchester County
Nearby Parks: 
Landowner: 
County
Manager: 
Westchester County Parks
Park ID: 
133

Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
Weir in Sleepy Hollow Photo: Jane Daniels
Ventilator along the Old Croton Aqueduct Photo: Jim Simpson
NYNJTC maintained: 
0

Completed in 1842, the Old Croton Aqueduct was built to meet the water needs of New York City's growing population. While capable of carrying 100 million gallons per day, the Aqueduct was replaced by a new structure in the 1890's, though it continued to serve city residents until 1965. 

Hiking
Mountain biking
Bridle path
X-C skiing
Accessible
Dogs on leash
26 miles
Lat/Lon: 
41.011832, -73.876760
Several
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park

Affectionately called the Aqueduct, the 26.2-mile Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park, running from Yonkers to Cortlandt in Westchester County, is heavily used by its neighbors and friends. Joggers, cyclists and dog walkers use it to exercise. For others, it is route to walk to work, school, or the train station. The original 41-mile length of the Aqueduct was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1992. 

While 26 miles may be too long for a walk or day-hike, the route is conveniently separated here into three sections. 

  • Ossining to Quaker Bridge (5.5 miles) features some of the more natural settings of the entire 26 mile route.  Shortly after crossing Quaker Bridge Road, the wide path follows a route carved into the hillside and is uninterrupted by road crossings for nearly a mile.  The Croton River is visible through the trees far below to the left. 
  • Tarrytown to Yonkers (9 miles) hails along its path an American Gothic Revival "castle" named Lyndhurst, built around 1840 and once owned by railroad baron Jay Gould.  Another highlight includes spectacular views of the Hudson River and the Palisades. 
  • Tarrytown to Ossining (9 miles) takes you back in time to the old Dutch Reformed Church and Sleepy Hollow Cemetery as well as through a section of woodlands and the Rockefeller State Park Preserve. 

Driving Directions

The Old Croton Aqueduct has multiple access points including 90 road crossings.  Use the Aqueduct map or a Westchester County map to reach various road crossings.  Where the Aqueduct runs through residential areas, parking is limited.  Parking areas are at Croton Dam (Cortlandt), Croton Gorge Park (Cortlandt), Joseph P. Caputo Community Center (Ossining), River Road (Scarborough), Gory Brook (Sleepy Hollow), Prospect Avenue (Tarrytown), and municipal lots which require a permit on weekdays.  There are many places to park a car on streets near the Aqueduct. 

Public Transportation

Metro-North Hudson Line Ossining, Scarborough, Tarrytown, Irvington, Ardsley-on-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Hastings, Greystone, Glenwood, and Yonkers stations are within walking distance of the Aqueduct.  Although Beeline Buses run along Route 9, they often have limited service.  The 1C, 1T and 1W buses along Warburton Avenue terminate at the 242nd Street/Broadway subway station (MTA #1) at Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx. 

Westchester County
Fees: 
None
Modified By: 
Phil McLewin
Last Update: 
11/09/2016
Landowner: 
NYS OPRHP
Manager: 
Rockefeller State Park Preserve
Park ID: 
405
eBase: 
Missing
Region - Maintenance: 

Loop Hike to Fire Tower Site and Indian Rock Shelter from Michigan Road Parking Area


View Untitled in a larger map

Deer Photo: Jane Daniels
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike climbs to the highest point of this Westchester County park and passes an interesting rock shelter.

3 hours
Moderate
4 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Horses allowed
Fees
Views
Woods
Historic: 
Ward Pound Ridge Reservation
Westchester County
NY
Westchester
02/25/2010
Trailhead GPS Coordinates: 
41.264905,-73.616295
Driving: 

From I-684, take Exit 6 (Route 35) and turn east. Follow Route 35 east for 3.7 miles, then turn right onto Route 121 south. After crossing a bridge, immediately turn left into Ward Pound Ridge Reservation. Continue for 0.7 mile to the tollbooth (there is a parking fee on weekends, daily in summer),  Make the next right onto Michigan Road and continue for 0.7 mile to a parking area on the right, just before a circle at the end of the road.

Walk back to a junction where a "parking" sign points to the right. Turn right into a dirt parking area, follow it to its end, then continue along a wide path, passing a cedar tree on the right. At the end of the path, steeply descend the hillside. At the base of the descent, bear right and follow the FH blazes of the Fox Hill Trail (in the direction indicated by the sign "To Junction Marker 9"). The trail climbs, passing through gaps in several stone walls. Just below the high point, it bears left and begins to descend.

Reference/Source: 
Daniel Chazin: Hike of the Week