Ruin

Kennedy Dells County Park

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
Crum Creek flowing over a breached dam - Photo credit: Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
0

Only a small portion of this 179-acre park is developed for active recreation.  Most of the park consists of wooded areas and open fields.  Hiking trails loop around the park, and a 2.4-mile circular hike is possible.  The western boundary of the park is the scenic Crum Creek, paralleled by a trail, and an old road leads down to ruins of a stone dam, stone arches that once supported a bridge over the creek, and a stone pumphouse,

Hiking
Bridle path
X-C skiing
Dogs on leash
3 miles
179 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.168625, -73.988881
New City
Rockland
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park

Owned in the early 1900s by the well-known movie producer Adolph Zukor, this 179-acre park offers a fitness trail, hiking trails, horseback riding, a horse corral, nature study, soccer, and cross-country skiing.

There are two major trails in the park -- the 1.4-mile white-blazed Bridle Path, and the 1.4-mile unblazed Fitness Trail.  These trails can be combined to make a 2.4-mile loop hike around the perimeter of the park.  Although the Bridle Trail is open to equestrian use, it is primarily frequented by canines (accompanied by the owners and other family members). A section of the Bridle Path parallels scenic Crum Creek, the western boundary of the park, and an old road leads down to the remains of a stone dam (now breached), a road bridge over the creek (all that remains are the stone-arch abutments) and a stone pumphouse (with ruins of the machinery still inside). The park features nearly level topography, so the hikes are all easy. Click here for a description of a loop hike in the park.

Click here for a downloadable trail map. 

To reach the park, take NY 304 to Main Street in New City and follow Main Street north for about one mile, past the County Court House, to the park entrance on the left.

Public Transportation: Rockland Coaches

Rockland County
Fees: 
None
Modified By: 
Daniel Chazin
Last Update: 
11/30/2009
Landowner: 
County
Park ID: 
344
eBase: 
Missing

Leon Levy Preserve

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
What remains of the Black Mansion Photo: Jane Daniels
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

Haboring a variety of wildlife, the Leon Levy Preserve has 25-foot high cliffs, extensive wetlands, and hardwood forests. 

Hiking
Bridle path
X-C skiing
Dogs on leash
5 miles
383 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.260874, -73.530020
Lewisboro
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park
The Leon Levy Preserve is tranquil, scenic, and, adding to the charm of the place, a mansion in ruins. The preserve is named in memory of its principal benefactor., Leon Levy. His love of Lewisboro and for nature came together in the purchase of watershed property that local residents had been trying to protect since 1996.

The carriage roads on this former estate have become hiking trails and are wide enough to allow walking two or three abreast. Extensive stonework is apparent on the many at-grade raised roadbeds. 

From I-684, take Exit 6 (Route 35) and turn east. Continue 9.1 miles and turn right at the traffic light onto Route 123 just before the New York-Connecticut line. Continue south 0.3 mile and just after the sign for the preserve, turn right into the parking lot .
 
No public transportation
Westchester County
Modified By: 
Jane Daniels
Last Update: 
11/10/2016
Landowner: 
Municipality
Manager: 
Town of Lewisboro
Park ID: 
425

Cranberry Lake Preserve

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
Quarry at Cranberry Lake Photo: Jane Daniels
Crusher Wall Photo: Jane Daniels
A small quarry Photo: Jane Daniels
Along the shore of Cranberry Lake Photo: Jane Daniels
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

Watershed lands are on two sides of Cranberry Lake Preserve. This quiet oasis in suburban Westchester County is also the site of the quarry operations to supply stone to build the Kensico Dam, completed in 1917.

Hiking
No dogs
6 miles
190 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.075128, -73.756070
Valhalla
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park

Cranberry Lake Preserve's tranquil environment includes a glacial lake, wetlands, and abandoned quarrying operations. The portions of the preserve that are sparsely used offer a chance for solitude. All seasons here have their high notes: in early spring, an overture to the opening season erupts from the chorus of spring peepers emerging from the many vernal pools. Hot summer days are tempered in the shade under a canopy of trees. When fall colors are at their peak, a stroll around Cranberry Lake is a feast for the eyes.

The trail system at the preserve is designed with a novice hiker in mind. The Red and Yellow trails at are loops which allow visitors to follow only one color and return to their starting point. The History Trail is also a loop, often co-aligned with one of those trails. The Blue Trail is no longer a loop because a boardwalk section across South Pond was removed when it became unsafe. Trails that start at the Nature Center lead downhill to the lake. Conneting trails are blazed white or orange. 
From the Bronx River Parkway at the Kensico Dam in Valhalla, take Route 22 north. Once past the dam, make the first right turn onto Old Orchard Street and again the first right to enter the preserve.
 
No public transportation
Westchester County
Modified By: 
Jane Daniels
Last Update: 
11/05/2016
Landowner: 
County
Manager: 
Westchester County Parks
Park ID: 
39
Region - Maintenance: 

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Complete: 
Yes


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New Jersey Boardwalk on the Appalachian Trail - Photo Moe Lemire
Appalachian Trail near Bellevale, NY - Photo Marie-Pierre Castermans
Extra Pictures: 
New Jersey Boardwalk on the Appalachian Trail - Photo Moe Lemire
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

A beautiful 160-mile segment of the Appalachian Trail passes through the New York-New Jersey region.

 

Hiking
X-C skiing
Accessible
Dogs on leash
160 miles
Lat/Lon: 
41.244185, -74.287035
Multiple locations /NY/NJ
US
Cluster/Park: 
Park

The Appalachian Trail is one of the longest continuously marked footpath in the world, measuring roughly 2,180 miles in length. The Trail goes through fourteen states along the crests and valleys of the Appalachian mountain range from the southern terminus at Springer Mountain, Georgia, to the Trail’s northern terminus at Katahdin, Maine. 

An overview map of the trail along its entire length is available from the National Park “Appalachian National Scenic Trail” web page. 

The AT is uniformly marked with a 2" x 6" white-painted, vertical blaze.

For detailed descriptions of hikes in the region click on Find a Hike -- sort on “Title” column for hikes beginning with “Appalachian Trail …” The majority of these are loop hikes in conjunction with other trails.  For AT-only hikes click here. The database includes a few AT hikes in nearby sections of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. 

Two of the few wheelchair accessible sections from Georgia to Maine are in this region:

 

Driving:

For specific traveling directions and parking areas use the “Find a Hike” and “Find a Park” links provided above, then scroll to the particular park or hike you plan to visit.  

Public Transportation:

Hike descriptions will indicate if public transportation (train or bus) is available to a particular trailhead. 

The AT crosses the Metro-North Railroad’s Harlem Line at the Appalachian Trail station (just off N.Y. Route 22, between Pawling and Wingdale) -- the only train station located directly at an AT crossing anywhere along the 2,180-mile-long trail!  Limited service is provided at the Appalachian Trail station, with trains stopping there only on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays (the station, which is little more than a low-level platform, is not wheelchair accessible).  At other times, hikers may board trains at Pawling (to the south) or Harlem Valley-Wingdale (to the north).  Trains run north to Wassaic and south to Grand Central Terminal in New York City.
 

 

 

Appalachian Trail
Fees: 
Some times and places; check with park
Park ID: 
252
eBase: 
Missing

Taxter Ridge Park Preserve

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes


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Chimney from Woodycrest Photo: Jane Daniels
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

In the midst of heavily traveled highways and bordered by residential areas, Taxter Ridge Park Preserve is a large green oasis providing enjoyable hiking though beautiful woods. 

 

 

Hiking
Dogs on leash
2 miles
190 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.059352, -73.846266
Town of Greenburgh
Westchester
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park

Considered by some to be the gateway to Westchester County, Taxter Ridge Park Preserve is an excellent example of how concerned citizens rallied to protect a large tract of open space in southern Westchester County. The horse-shoe shaped park has a landscape featuring natural rock ledges, woodlands, streams, wetlands and old growth forest. The 190 acre park is jointly owned by New York State, Westchester County and the Town of Greenburgh with the latter providing maintance.

 

 

There are three blazed trails in the preserve:

Hike in from parking on Mt Pleasant Lane and follow an easy trail (blue blaze) through wooded forest for 1.4 miles. The trail passes by a 250 year-old oak tree and a deep ravine.

From parking on Sheldon Avenue in Tarrytown, hike a more challenging trail (orange blaze) for 0.9 mile that meanders up and down hills. Initially it is on a graded woods road. A bit after it becomes a single track, until it meets the blue-blazed trail from Mt Pleasant Lane.  Sections away from the NYS Thruway are quiet.

A third 0.2-mile trail (yellow blaze) from Taxter Road in Greenburgh is not open, but will lead from a proposed parking lot to be built but as of 2016 funds are still lacking. 

 

To reach the Sheldon Avenue trailhead (at end of a dead end road)

  • From westbound I-87-I287 take the Route 119 Exit (last exit before toll). Turn left onto Route 119 and when it ends at Route 9, turn left again just past the east bound I-87/I287 exit/ entrance ramp. Turn left on Walter Avenue. Go left again on Sheldon Avenue and follow it 0.5 mile to the end.  
  • From east bound I-87/I-287, stay in the right hand lane when approaching the tolls of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Take Exit 9, Route 9 and turn left at the bottom of the ramp. Take the next left and follow the directions above from.
  • GPS Coordinates: 41.059242,-73.84747

The Mt. Pleasant Lane trailhead (on-street parking in a cul-de-sac)

  • From Route 9 in Tarrytown, turn east on East Sunnyside Lane which is opposite the road to Sunnyside historic site. Go 0.6 mile and make a slight left onto Taxter Road. Take the first left onto Pine Lane and left again to Mt. Pleasant Lane. Park in the cul-de-sac near the sign.
  • GPS coordinates: 41.048751,-73.849461

No public transportation

Westchester County
Fees: 
None
Modified By: 
Jane Daniles
Last Update: 
11/09/2016
Landowner: 
Partnership
Manager: 
Town of Greenburgh
Park ID: 
205
eBase: 
Rename
eBase Name: 
Taxter Ridger Preserve

Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
NYNJTC maintained: 
0

The park commemorates “The Cradle of American Industry."

Hiking
Accessible
Dogs on leash
35 acres
Lat/Lon: 
40.9144289, -74.1802668
Paterson
Passaic
NJ
RegionURL: 
Cluster/Park: 
Park

The Great Falls of the Passaic River, located in Paterson, N.J., is the site of an early, successful initiative to establish a “national manufactory” in post-revolutionary America.  As part of the Mercantilist vision of Alexander Hamilton, the country’s first Secretary of the Treasury, Paterson become America’s earliest planned industrial city with the incorporation of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (S.U.M.) in 1791.

Great Falls in Winter (NPS photo)The Welcome Center, at 65 McBride Avenue Extension across from Overlook Park, is a great place to begin a visit -- check their website for seasonal hours. It is where the self-guided Mill Mile tour starts. This walking tour introduces visitors to the remarkable history, geology, social and cultural importance of the area around the site of the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park. An on-line brochure describing the 10-stop tour – which includes a map -- is available, as is a free downloadable audio tour app (from I-Tunes and Google Play Store) and a number to call using a cell phone along the way.   The Tour is an educational project of the Hamilton Partnership for Paterson.  

The National Park Service also offers Guided Introductory Tours seasonally. Led by a National Park Ranger, a volunteer, or a member of the Great Falls Youth Corps, it takes roughly one hour and covers one mile.  See the website link in Contact Information below for a schedule, follow the "Plan a Visit" tab. 

“Trails” largely consist of city sidewalks with uneven surfaces.  A graphical representation map of the park (use link near top of this page)  identifies such major features as the Great Falls, mills (both standing and in ruins), the S.U.M. Hydroelectric Station, the upper, middle and lower raceways, street names (for navigation), smaller local parks, cultural centers, several public parking areas, and (important in an urban setting) public restrooms. 

To complement a visit with a more woodsy hiking experience, Rifle Camp Park and Garret Mountain Reservation, two interconnected Passaic County parks just a short drive from the mill district, have a combined trail network of 13 miles on roughly 800 acres of parkland. 

 

From I-80 West, take Exit 57 B-A. Follow the Downtown Paterson signs. Turn left at second light onto Cianci Street, and left at first light onto Market Street for 1/4 mile. Turn right onto Spruce. Go one block and turn right onto McBride Avenue Extension, then immediately left into Great Falls Overlook parking area.

From I-80 East, take Exit 57 B, circle onto Grand Street exit. At end of exit ramp turn left onto Grand. At second light on Grand turn right onto Spruce Street. At second light on Spruce bear right onto McBride Avenue Extension, then turn immediately left into the Great Falls Overlook parking area.

From the Garden State Parkway use the “Directions” link on the park’s webpage under Contact Information.

New Jersey Transit provides regular train service (including weekends) to Paterson on its Main Line.  Trains leave from Hoboken, but connections from New York City are available via PATH trains from World Trade Center or 33rd Street to Hoboken, or NJ Transit trains from Penn Station to Secaucus Junction. The walk from the Paterson train station to Overlook Park at the Great Falls is about 0.8 mile. 

NJ Transit Bus Route 161 connects the 42nd Street Port Authority Bus Terminal with Paterson, stopping near the NJ Transit train station.

See also Location Tab at top of page.

Watchungs
Fees: 
None
Landowner: 
NPS
Manager: 
973.523.5295; Ilyse_goldman@nps.gov
Park ID: 
366
eBase: 
Missing

Yellow-Silver/Schuber/Cannonball Trail/Bear Swamp Lake Loop


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Placeholder for Hike
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike traverses less-used portions of the reservation, climbing to a viewpoint over Bergen County and the Manhattan skyline and passing several lakes.

5 hours
Moderate to Strenuous
9 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Waterfall
Ramapo Valley County Reservation
Historic: 
Ramapo Mountains
NJ
Bergen
115 North Jersey Trails East
06/06/2008
Trailhead GPS Coordinates: 
41.077928,-74.186575
Driving: 

Take N.J. Route 17 to U.S. Route 202 in Mahwah. Turn left at the bottom of the ramp, proceed south on Route 202 for two miles, and turn right into the Ramapo Valley County Reservation parking area.

Bus: 

Short Line offers bus service from Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City to Ramapo College, which is located about a mile to the north of the park entrance on Route 202. For schedule information, go to www.shortlinebus.com. Only limited service is available on weekends.

The hike begins at a kiosk in the southwest corner of the parking area. Just ahead, you'll notice two triple blazes on a tree. The three silver-on-white blazes mark the start of the Silver Trail, while the three orange blazes designate the start of the Schuber Trail.

Follow the co-aligned Silver and Schuber Trails, which descend a slope to join a paved park road. The paved road bears left, but the trails continue ahead and cross the Ramapo River on a steel truss bridge. In another 250 feet, follow the orange blazes as they turn left, leaving the wide park road.

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week

South Beacon Mountain Firetower and Scofield Ridge

Beacon reservoir from fire tower - South Beacon Mountain Firetower and Scofield Ridge - Hudson Highlands State Park - Photo: Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This hike climbs to the firetower atop the summit of South Beacon Mountain and follows the Scofield Ridge, passing many panoramic viewpoints over the Hudson River and the surrounding mountains.

7 hours
Strenuous
8 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Public Transportation
Views
Historic: 
Hudson Highlands State Park
East Hudson Highlands
NY
Dutchess
102 East Hudson Trails North
06/02/2006
08/17/2014
Trailhead GPS Coordinates: 
41.493547,-73.959854 (or N41°29.61282, W073°57.59124)
Driving: 

Take the Palisades Interstate Parkway to its northern terminus at the Bear Mountain Bridge. Cross the bridge, bear left onto N.Y. 9D, and proceed north on N.Y. 9D for 14.5 miles. As NY 9D (Wolcott Avenue) curves sharply to the left at Bob’s Corner Store in Beacon, turn right onto Howland Avenue. Immediately, turn right into the parking area for Scenic Hudson’s Mount Beacon Park.

Train: 

Take the Metro-North Hudson Line to the Beacon station. The trailhead is approximately 1.5 miles from the train station.  To reach the trailhead from the station turn right (south) onto Beekman Street (towards Dia Beacon).  In 0.4 mile, Beekman Street ends, and you should continue along Wolcott Avenue (Route 9D).  In about another mile, Wolcott Avenue makes a sharp right turn.  At this bend, turn left onto Howland Avenue.  The trailhead is on your right.

This hike begins with a steady, steep climb of 1,000 feet of elevation in the first mile, and the overall elevation gain exceeds 2,000 feet. It is not an easy hike, but the spectacular views that it affords are ample reward for the strenuous ascents. Much of the land traversed by the hike has been protected through the efforts of Scenic Hudson, which preserves open space in the Hudson River valley.

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week

Schuber/Yellow-Silver Trails Loop


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MacMillan Reservoir - Photo by Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike traverses lesser-used areas of the reservation, passing MacMillan Reservoir and attractive cascades, and climbs to a panoramic viewpoint over the Manhattan skyline.

5 hours
Moderate to Strenuous
8 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Waterfall
Historic: 
Ramapo Valley County Reservation
Ramapo Mountains
NJ
Bergen
115 North Jersey Trails East
12/15/2003
08/28/2016
Trailhead GPS Coordinates: 
41.077928,-74.186575
Driving: 

Take N.J. Route 17 to U.S. Route 202 in Mahwah. Proceed south on Route 202 for two miles, then turn right into the Ramapo Valley County Reservation parking area.

Bus: 

Short Line offers bus service from Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City to Ramapo College, which is located about a mile to the north of the park entrance on Route 202. For schedule information, go to www.shortlinebus.com. Only limited service is available on weekends.

The hike begins at a kiosk in the southwest corner of the parking area. Just ahead, you'll notice a triple-yellow blaze on a tree, which marks the start of the Vista Loop Trail. Follow the yellow blazes as they descend wooden steps, join a wide dirt road, and continue ahead to cross the Ramapo River on a steel truss bridge. In another 250 feet, the green-dot-on-orange-blazed River Trail begins on the left, but you should continue ahead on the wide dirt road, following the southern shore of Scarlet Oak Pond (formerly the site of a gravel quarry).

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week

Ramapo Lake Loop


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Placeholder for Hike
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This hike loops around scenic Ramapo Lake.

2 hours
Easy
4 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Historic: 
Ramapo Mountain State Forest
Ramapo Mountains
NJ
Bergen
Passaic
115 North Jersey Trails East
01/09/2003
01/04/2016
Trailhead GPS Coordinates: 
41.032596, -74.251801
Driving: 

Take I-287 to Exit 57 (Skyline Drive/Ringwood) and proceed north on Skyline Drive (following the signs to "Ringwood"). Just ahead on the left is the Ramapo Mountain State Forest parking area.

From the southern end of the parking area, follow the blue blazes of the MacEvoy Trail, which passes stone ruins, turns right onto a woods road and climbs a steep pitch. The trail continues to climb on a wide, rocky path, paralleling a caCascades in the brook along the Macavoy Trail. Photo by Daniel Chazin.

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week
HOTW Date: 
Fri, 01/08/2016
HOTW Count: 
1