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Daniel Chazin's picture

The New Jersey Walk Book went out of print several years ago.  At present, the Trail Conference Publications Committee has decided not to revise and reprint it.  Updated information on trails, hikes and parks in New Jersey is available on the Trail Conference website.
horicon@post.com's picture

Why??
horicon@post.com's picture

There is still snow on the ground in Ulster County, NY
Michael K7's picture

On my 2009 North Jersey trail map 116, it shows the proposed route for the Iron Belt Trail, which would connect the Appalachian Trail and the Highlands Trail in the western section of that map area. Having just received the 2014 edition of this map set, i noticed that the proposed route is no longer on the map, nor is there any mention of the trail. Was the idea for this trail abandoned for some reason?
Bob's picture

Hey Michael........Many hours went into the planning and design of this rather long trail (for NJ Trails, that is), but there were complications. One of which was the remoteness of this proposed trail and access points in the event of an emergency or a hiker becoming benighted. At the moment it's on the back burner, but may be revieved sometime in the future. Please don't attempt to locate any trace of it since it was only a Trail on a map, not on the ground.
Michael K7's picture

Thank you for the reply. I wasn't planning on looking for it lol, but i was somewhat disappointed to see that it had not come to fruition, since it looked like a great area for hiking. I do understand the reasoning for not going through with the trail though.
Michael K7's picture

I have an older version of the Harriman map set (2010), and it shows a shelter on the White Bar Trail, just south of 106. I passed that area today, and took a look around, but could not find the shelter. All i saw were numerous fire rings spread around the area. Does this shelter still exist? If so, does anyone know what kind of shape it's in? Thanks   Also, i stayed at the Bald Rocks shelter last night, and it is in great shape since the park did work on it. It does have a very small sleeping platform though, 2, maybe 3 people at most. I'm not sure why the park didn't extend the platform all the way across inside...
Jeremy Apgar's picture

The shelter on the White Bar Trail, just south of its crossing of Route 106 (and before reaching Car Pond Mountain), was removed from the map in the next published edition in 2012.  This particular shelter was an old camp shelter and not like the official shelters in the park.  It had no floor, was a metal structure, was located off the trail a short distance, and was something we and the park did not want to show on the map for safety issues, as well as to make sure map users did not think this shelter structure was similar to the other official shelters in the park.~Jeremy, TC Cartographer
Michael K7's picture

Thanks Jeremy- i plan on updating my Harriman maps with this week's sale, but i appreciate the reply.
qvideo's picture

I can't find a trail map that covers the area east (-ish) of High Point NJ (map 123) and west (-ish) of Vernon NJ (map 116). That would cover a small portion of the AT as well as Liberty Marsh etc. Am I just looking in the wrong place, or does it not exist?
Daniel Chazin's picture

The Trail Conference does not publish a map that covers the area between High Point (Map 123) and Vernon (Map 116).  That area is, however, covered on one of the maps that accompanies the Appalachian Trail Guide for New York and New Jersey, published by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and available from the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference.
qvideo's picture

Oh well, thanks for the reply. I wouldn't buy the bookset for just this one section. Maybe you guys can add this at some future point in time.....
Bob's picture

Folks, we all want more open space, but this bill before the voters is simply a "Shell Game", where we are being asked to Rob Peter to pay Paul. While it may appear that this bill will provide 71 Million Dollars for "Open Space", but in fact it will be robbing this amount that was approved by voters in 2006. Pollution control programs will be reduced to essentially nothing, State parks will lose all previously approved funding for major repairs and upgrades. And a "Yes" vote will result in a loss of jobs for about 200 DEP Employees. Vote "NO" to protect our Parks and Pollution Control Programs.
tree188's picture

In regard to the open space funding question on November 4, 2014, in New Jersey.  While this question and the people behind it are well intentioned, this is a classic case of the Law of Un-Intended Consequences.  I urge voters to vote "No" on this question.               I have previously supported open space funding but find it harder and harder to do so for various reasons.  This recent public question has not provided the public with enough information about where the money to pay for this program will come from.  In reading about this question, it appears that for all intent and purposes the money will be taken from the NJDEP Parks budget and the budgets for other NJDEP programs related to clean water planning and enforcement, hazardous waste site clean-up and even air pollution programs.  This was recently described in a review of the CBT (Corporate Business Tax) and NJDEP budget that was analyzed by the environmental group known as PEER- NJ Chapter, that can be reviewed at http://www.wolfenotes.com/page/2/ on the October 21, 2014 entry, " Flying Blind on Open Space – And Lying About It".   The state parks have enough trouble already to obtain funding to operate and are resorting more and more to charging fees to run their operations.  While some may say the users should pay to use these locations, the parks were always supposed to be for everyone, regardless of income, to enjoy the outdoors for little or no money as a public service for all.  Don't complain about reduced access to parks or activities because you voted to reduce the meager funding the parks currently receive.     Additionally, the other environmental programs that would be affected will result in fewer personnel to carry programs the public may not see directly but absolutely affect everyone's health and quality of life.  Don't complain about dirty water or odors/air pollution or clean beaches or other environmental issues if you vote for this public question and it results in layoffs of the people who perform these jobs.  And if more open space is purchased, who will be there to oversee it?  To prevent problems like the rampant dumping of solid waste on public property (parks) or prevent other damages to these resources that are currently occurring?   This public question, if passed, will end up having unforeseen negative consequences.  While true open space is important (not ball fields or lighting; a manipulation of what this fund was intended for, but for undeveloped natural space), this is not the way to fund its purchase.  I will not vote for the passage of this public question.  I urge voters to carefully consider the negative impacts of this question and vote "No" on this question.      
Estelle's picture

thank you Joe, for calling it as it is!  We voted for stable funding for the Parks in 2006; this "new" question seeks to re-write that vote by stripping $39 million from environmental programs as outlined in your post as well as $32 million from the State Parks. And that loss of money remains through fiscal year 2020!   (The Parks have a $400 million backlog on capital repairs and upgrades - that's why we votedin 2006.)    I have heard estimates of 200+ people being terminate by NJDEP - people who would monitor pollution problems and effect remediation. Thanks for your honest opinion. Estelle   
amber.ray's picture

The Trail Conference urges a YES vote on Question 2. This referendum is not perfect, but it is the only chance we have to secure permanent funds for land acquisition and parks improvement, as well as stewardship efforts. After passage, it is then incumbent on the Trail Conference, the New Jersey Keep It Green Coalition, and everyone with an interest in preserving our parks to ensure the enabling legislation allocates a significant portion of the funds for parks improvement. Furthermore, we will need to continue working to ensure parks receive adequate annual budgets. -- Amber Ray, Trail Conference Communications Manager
joerichkus's picture

Also the New Jersey Sierra Club is urging everyone to vote YES : "On November 4th you will have the opportunity to save open space in New Jersey by supporting Public Question #2! This ballot question would dedicate part of the Corporation Business Tax revenues to fund open space preservation.  Passing this ballot measure is critical for New Jersey’s future.  Without this funding there will be no money left to buy open space, save farmland, buyouts of flood prone properties, or to build parks and playgrounds in our neighborhoods.  Open Space is the most successful program in state history and without funding the bulldozers will win.  Once you lose open space to development you can never get it back. That is why it is critical to vote YES to save open space in the Garden State! Investing in open space is investing in our future. Urban parks are a catalyst for redevelopment. Open space helps our tourist economy with outdoor recreation providing more than $4 billion a year in economic activity. Preserving farmland keeps our agriculture industry viable. By buying open space we also protect our water supply. We would be hurting ourselves both environmentally and economically by not investing in parks and open space. New Jersey needs this funding for open space now more than ever! We need to help buyout families that have been impacted by flooding. We need to keep the garden in the Garden State. We need to make sure we have parks and recreation areas for our families to enjoy. Most importantly buying open space helps protect our environment, our water supply, creates habitat for threatened and endangered species, and protects our forest and farmlands. We urge you to VOTE YES on Public Question #2 to save New Jersey’s Open Space!"
tree188's picture

Sierra Club would rather gut other environmental programs than do what is right, robbing Peter to pay Paul.  The lack of detail on Club's part is disingenuous.  Don't be fooled by a bad proposition.  Open space is important but so are the details ABOUT HOW TO PAY FOR IT.  It's great that the TC and the KIG coaIiton are now setting precedent to start canabalizing environmental programs for the benefit of other environmental programs.  Jeff Tittle & company will be the first to complain when water quality is impacted, the underground storage tank program decimated or parks can no longer support themselves when the money has been diverted to this poor choice.  Who knows, maybe Sierra Club is playing chicken with the State thinking the State would not be so bold as to gut these other programs due to public back lash over funding cuts.  Think again, it will happen.   There will be un-intended consequences if this question is passed.  At least we will know where to publically assign the blame when it happens.  VOTE NO FOR PUBLIC QUESTION #2 on NOv.4, 2014.
Willy's picture

There are news stories this morning that a bear killed a hiker in Apshawa Reserve in NJ. Initial reports are that a group of hikers were being followed by a bear while hiking in the reserve. The hikers made the mistake of running in different directions to try to get away from the bear. One of the hikers was found dead by authorities a few hours later after failing to reunite with the other walkers. If you ever run into a bear in the woods, DO NOT run away. That is one of the worst things you can do. Do not panic. Make yourself look as big as possible. Make noise, shout, etc., and slowly back away from the bear. My condolences to the family of the deceased. RIP.
Michael K7's picture

and by chance, today my copy of Trail Walker arrived in the mail, with an article by Jerry Adams about his experience with a "problem bear" in Stokes State Forest. Be careful out there folks.

Remember: The safest place right now is at home.