Mine

Red Back Loop Trail

Stream crossing on the Red Back Trail - Photo by Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This hike loops around the southeastern corner of the park, following woods roads for most of the way and passing the historic Red Back Mine.

4 hours
Moderate to Strenuous
7 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Historic: 
Sterling Forest State Park
Sterling Forest
NY
Orange
100 Sterling Forest
04/03/2017
Driving: 

Take the New York State Thruway to Exit 15A. Turn left at the bottom of the ramp onto Route 17 and head north for 1.4 miles to the exit for Sterling Forest. Follow Sterling Mine Road (County Route 72) west for 2.4 miles, then turn right onto Eagle Valley Road. Continue on Eagle Valley Road for 0.8 mile to South Gate Road. Turn right onto South Gate Road and continue for 1.2 miles. Opposite Buttonwood Road (on the right), turn left at a Hikers’ Trailhead Parking sign and proceed for a short distance to a dirt parking area.

This hike, for the most part, follows woods roads in a loop around the southeastern section of Sterling Forest State Park, with considerable ups and downs. It traverses a remote and little-used section of the park, and portions of the trail may be very wet, especially after heavy rains. Along the way, the trail passes remnants of the historic Red Back Mine and runs along the interesting McKeags Meadow.

HOTW Count: 
1

Four Birds Trail/Wildcat Ridge Trail Loop from Lower Hibernia Road

Wildcat Ridge Trail in a rock cut for the former Oreland Branch Railroad - Photo by Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike passes many remnants of former mining activity, including a barricaded mine used by hibernating bats and an abandoned cemetery, reaches a panoramic viewpoint, and follows an old railroad bed.

5 hours
Moderate
7 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Historic: 
Wildcat Ridge Wildlife Management Area
Morris County
NJ
Morris
125 Jersey Highlands Trails-Central North
01/08/2017
Driving: 

Take I-80 West to Exit 37 (Hibernia/Rockaway). At the bottom of the ramp, turn left onto Green Pond Road (County 513). Follow Green Pond Road north for 2.8 miles and turn right onto Lower Hibernia Road. Immediately turn left into a parking area for the Wildcat Ridge Wildlife Management Area.

From the parking area, the Four Birds Trail heads north on a woods road, running jointly with the orange-blazed Hibernia Brook Trail. To the right are the stone-and-concrete ruins of buildings that once processed ore extracted from the Hibernia Mines. In 300 feet, bear right to continue on the white-blazed Four Birds Trail (the orange-blazed Hibernia Mine Trail bears left here). In another 100 feet, follow the white blazes as they turn left onto another woods road.    

HOTW Count: 
1

Lake Ames Park

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes


View Lake Ames Park in a larger map

NYNJTC maintained: 
0

This park features a large playground facility, with picnic areas and a walking trail around the lake. Shoreline fishing is permitted. No swimming or boating.

Hiking
Dogs on leash
3 miles
285 acres
Lat/Lon: 
40.951404, -74.502704
Rockaway Township
Morris
NJ
Cluster/Park: 
Park

Purchased by Rockaway Township for nearly $1 million in 1979, this park has picnic and playground facilities, a pavilion and opportunities for short walks. You can also investigate the three or four openings of the Denmark Mine. Although a quantity of ore was removed from some of them, the material contained large amounts of pyrite and was never mined.

In addition to the walk around the lake, more ambitious walkers will find a red tral that meets snake hill road about 100' West of the bridge and again, on Snake Hill road about 1 mile further west. The trail is about 3 miles long, but may require brook crossings that might be difficult in high water. If you don't like to cross streams, just bushwhack out until the trail returns. You will pass the Denmark Mine. Be sure not to trespass on private property.

West on I-80 to exit 37 townard NJ=513/Hibernia/Rockaway. Keep left at the fork, following signs for Green Pond Road. Turn left at Green Pont Road and follow it for 3.2 miles. Turn left at Snake Hill Road. The park will be on the right in 0.3 mile.

Morris County
Landowner: 
Municipality
Park ID: 
346
eBase: 
Missing

Fahnestock State Park [Clarence Fahnestock Memorial State Park]

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes
View of Canopus Lake from the Appalachian Trail - Photo credit: Daniela Wagstaff
View of Hidden Lake from the Three Lakes Trail - Photo credit: Daniela Wagstaff
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

Largest park in the area with diverse recreational opportunities on 50 miles of marked trails [including the Appalachian Trail], a variety of terrain, and numerous lakes, ponds and streams.

Hiking
Mountain biking
Bridle path
X-C skiing
Dogs on leash
50 miles
14086 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.462248, -73.829715
Philipstown, Putnam Valley
Putnam
NY
Cluster/Park: 
Park

The 14,000-acre Clarence Fahnestock Memorial State Park is in an historic iron-mining region, and several remnants of that industry remain in mine excavations, stone foundations and the old railbeds used by some trails. The park has hiking trails and multiple-use trails open to bikes and horses. There is a beach on Canopus Lake open in summer and groomed cross-country ski trails open in winter [both have seasonal fees]. A campground is located just east of the park office.


Many trails listed can be combined to create circuit hikes. Most trails have rocky sections and are moderately strenuous, with especially difficult and easy exceptions noted below.

  • The Appalachian Trail [blazed white] runs through the park. It is usually accessed from NY 301. North of NY 301 the trail roughly parallels the shore of Canopus Lake, with a beautiful view of the lake at 2.3 miles. South of NY 301 the trail follows an old mine railbed.
  • The Cabot Trail [white blaze; 1 mile] has gentle terrain and a short unmarked side trail to a pleasant viewpoint over Jordan Pond. It connects with the Charcoal Burners Trail and the Perkins Trail to make a 1.9-mile loop.
  • The Candlewood Hill Trail [red blaze; 2.1 miles one way or 3.5-mile loop] ascends Candlewood Hill, sometimes steeply, to long views in all directions.
  • The Catfish Loop [red blaze; 4.7 mile] is accessible where the Appalachian Trail crosses Dennytown Road and is a full loop west of the road. It passes through a wide variety of terrain typical of the area.
  • The Cedar Ridge Trail [yellow; 0.8 mile] follows an easement on a private farm through meadows to a view of the Hudson River.  Please leave all farm gates through the fields as you find them (open or closed)
  • The Charcoal Burners Trail [red; 3.3 miles], along with the Appalachian Trail, connects the north and south sections of the park. It follows a gently rolling ridge and provides access to the Perkins Trail and the Cabot Trail, also connecting with the Fahnestock Trail and the Wiccopee Trail.
  • The East Mountain Loop [red; 1.5 miles] crosses over the top of East Mountain.
  • The Fahnestock Trail [blue blazes; 7.3 miles] is the main east-west trail north of NY 301. This trail covers a wide variety of terrain, including a very steep climb to the top of Round Hill providing long views of the Hudson.
  • The Old Mine Railroad Trail [yellow; 1.6 miles], true to its name, in part follows the railbed of a Civil War era mule-drawn railroad used to haul iron ore. Consequently, it is quite level, with only one short rocky hill after it leaves the railbed.
  • The Pelton Pond Nature Trail [yellow; 1.5 miles] is the most-used trail in the park. Located across NY 301 from the park office, it is a level and scenic stroll circling the pond. There is a pavilion built by the CCC, a restroom, and a picnic area. A side trail leads to the Nature Center, which is open in summer. No dogs are allowed on this trail.
  • The Perkins Trail [yellow; 4.0 miles] encompasses rolling ridges, hilltop farm fields, views, and a long descent to a scenic stream. Please leave all farm gates through the fields as you find them (open or closed).
  • School Mountain Road [white; 4.1 miles] is a multi-use woods road that connects with several other trails. These side trails are foot traffic only.
  • The Three Lakes Trail [blue; 3.7 miles] is named for the three lakes it encounters on its meandering path. It begins at NY 301, crosses Sunk Mine Road, and ends at Dennytown Road.
  • The Wiccopee Trail [blue; 1.9 miles] is a scenic and lightly used connector between the Charcoal Burners Trail and School Mountain Road in the northernmost section of the park.
  • There are two multi-use trails that are open to horses and mountain bikes. One is blazed yellow and starts at Indian Brook Road, and the other is unblazed but starts at the Pelton Pond parking area. See also the trails in Clear Lake Scout Reservation, which connect with Fahnestock trails.

To find detailed descriptions of specific hikes, click here and scroll down the "Parks" column to the name of this park. 

Maps: A detailed trail map can be purchased from the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference (click on East Hudson Trails Map at top).

Fahnestock State Park is located along NY 301 between US 9 and the Taconic State Parkway. The park office is on NY 301 less than a mile west of the Taconic State Parkway. Parking for many trails is available in several locations along NY 301. See trail overviews for other trailhead parking. The park is not easily accessible by public transportation; the nearest Metro North station is 8 miles away in Cold Spring.

Fahnestock State Park
Fees: 
Some times and places; check with park

Modified By: 
josh, gayle; Phil McLewin
Last Update: 
12/18/2016
Landowner: 
NYS OPRHP
Manager: 
NYS OPRHP
Park ID: 
46
eBase: 
Rename
eBase Name: 
Fahnestock Memorial State Park

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Complete: 
Yes


View AT Parks in a larger map

New Jersey Boardwalk on the Appalachian Trail - Photo Moe Lemire
Appalachian Trail near Bellevale, NY - Photo Marie-Pierre Castermans
Extra Pictures: 
New Jersey Boardwalk on the Appalachian Trail - Photo Moe Lemire
NYNJTC maintained: 
1

A beautiful 162-mile segment of the Appalachian Trail passes through the New York-New Jersey region.

 

Hiking
X-C skiing
Accessible
Dogs on leash
162 miles
Lat/Lon: 
41.244185, -74.287035
Multiple locations /NY/NJ
Orange
US
Cluster/Park: 
Park

The Appalachian Trail is one of the longest continuously marked footpath in the world, measuring roughly 2,180 miles in length. The Trail goes through fourteen states along the crests and valleys of the Appalachian mountain range from the southern terminus at Springer Mountain, Georgia, to the Trail’s northern terminus at Katahdin, Maine. 

An overview map of the trail along its entire length is available from the National Park “Appalachian National Scenic Trail” web page. 

The AT is uniformly marked with a 2" x 6" white-painted, vertical blaze.

For detailed descriptions of hikes along the AT in NY and NJ click the "Choose another experience" button on this web site.  In the search field enter "Appalachian Trail."  The majority of these are loop hikes in conjunction with other trails.  For AT-only hikes click here. The database includes a few AT hikes in nearby sections of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. 

Two of the few wheelchair accessible sections from Georgia to Maine are in this region:

 

Driving:

Parking is available in all the parks listed on this site that host a segment of the AT.   One spot identified on this web page is where the AT crosses NY-17A  near Warwick, NY.  GPS Coordinates: 41.244185, -74.287035.

On the Appalachian Trail Region page look for the link “Parking along the AT.”  It features parking areas organized by state.

Public Transportation:

Hike descriptions that include the AT will indicate if public transportation (train or bus) is available to a particular trailhead. 

The AT crosses the Metro-North Railroad’s Harlem Line at the Appalachian Trail station (just off N.Y. Route 22, between Pawling and Wingdale) -- the only train station located directly at an AT crossing anywhere along the 2,180-mile-long trail!  Limited service is provided at the Appalachian Trail station, with trains stopping there only on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays (the station, which is little more than a low-level platform, is not wheelchair accessible).  At other times, hikers may board trains at Pawling (to the south) or Harlem Valley-Wingdale (to the north).  Trains run north to Wassaic and south to Grand Central Terminal in New York City.
 

 

 

Appalachian Trail
Fees: 
Some times and places; check with park
Modified By: 
Phil McLewin
Last Update: 
02/26/2017
Park ID: 
252
eBase: 
Missing

Sparta Mountain Wildlife Management Area

Historic: 
Complete: 
Yes


View Sparta Mountain WMA in a larger map

Old mining activity near Edison Monument - Photo credit: Daniela Wagstaff
NYNJTC maintained: 
0

An unusual joint cooperative management of a wildlife area by the NJ Audubon Society and the NJ Department of Environmental Protection. One encourages birding; the other permits hunting.

Hiking
No dogs
3461 acres
Lat/Lon: 
41.063498, -74.570722
Sparta, Jefferson, Hardyston
Sussex
NJ
Cluster/Park: 
Park

 

The Edison Trail is just over 4 miles long and passes through a habitat of forest, lakeside and wetland.  The trail may be rocky and wet in places.  The Highlands Trail, a long distance trail, traverses roughly 1.5 miles of the management area, with one segment east of Ryker Lake. In addition to two named dirt roads - North Entrance Trail and Monument Trail - other linking trails, side trails and woods roads make loop hikes or in-and-out hikes possible.

Use the Web Map link on this site to view an Audubon Society trail map and trail descriptions . Note: Trail names differ in some instances from other maps. In particular the Highlands Trail is identified as the HeritageTrail by the Audubon.  Topographical PDF maps are available for download from the Table of Wildlife Management Areas.  Several parking areas are shown, although local roads are not always clearly identified. 

To Ryker Lake Section:

  • From US 80, exit at Route 15, travel north 8.2 miles to Sparta/Lake Mohawk Exit [Route 181] on right.   Take 181 North 1.2 miles; take a right onto East Mountain Road.  Follow it for 1.3 miles and turn right onto Glen Road [Route 620 East]. Take Glen Road 3.7 miles and take a left onto Edison Road.  Entrance to Ryker Lake is 0.2 mile on your right.
  • From 287/23 Interchange, take Route 23 north 9.6 miles and take right jug-handle to Oak ridge Road exit.  Continue through light on Oak Ridge Road and drive 3.1 miles.  Take a right [past a gas station] onto Ridge Road.  Take Ridge Road 2.8 miles and take a right onto Edison Road. Entrance to Ryker Lake is 0.2 mile on your right.
  • GPS Coordinates: 41.050314, -74.549583

To the mining area and the Edison Monument:

  • Continue northwest along Edison Road from the Ryker Lake area for roughly 2 miles: Approximate GPS Coordinates: 41.064449, -74.571528 

Parking areas for other sections of the park are identified on maps for Sparta Mountain management area in "Table of Wildlife Management Areas" -- use link elsewhere on this site. 

 

Kittatinnies
Fees: 
None
Modified By: 
Ken Malkin; Phil McLewin
Last Update: 
03/15/2017
Landowner: 
NJ DEP
Park ID: 
428

Three Lakes Trail/Appalachian Trail Loop from Dennytown Road

John Allen Pond - Photo by Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike leads to the remains of an old iron mine, passes an attractive lake, and follows the scenic Appalachian Trail along a forested ridge.

4 hours
Moderate to Strenuous
5 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Waterfall
Historic: 
Fahnestock State Park
Fahnestock State Park
NY
Putnam
103 East Hudson Trails Fahnestock
06/26/2003
07/25/2012
Driving: 

Take the Palisades Interstate Parkway to its northern terminus at the Bear Mountain Bridge. Cross the bridge and proceed north on N.Y. Route 9D for about 8.5 miles to a junction with N.Y. Route 301 in Cold Spring. Turn right and follow Route 301 for about five miles to Dennytown Road, then turn right and follow Dennytown Road south for 1.1 miles to a dirt parking area on the left side of the road.

Proceed to the northeast corner of the parking area (to the right of an old stone building) and follow the blue-blazed Three Lakes Trail, which enters the woods, crosses a stream and bears right to parallel it. After passing a swamp on the right, the trail turns left and begins to climb rather steeply. Near the top of the hill, the trail passes an interesting split rock to the right. Just beyond – at the top of the rise – the remains of the Denny Mine may be seen to the right of the trail. Split Rock On The Way to Denny Mine.</body></html>

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week

Monks Trail Circular

NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike passes by remnants of the abandoned Winston Iron Mine and climbs to a viewpoint over the Monksville Reservoir.

2 hours
Moderate
3 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Long Pond Ironworks State Park
Historic: 
Wyanokies
NJ
Passaic
115 North Jersey Trails East
02/11/2010
Driving: 

Take Interstate Route 287 to Exit 57 and continue on Skyline Drive to its western end at Greenwood Lake Turnpike in Ringwood. Turn right and proceed for about four miles to Margaret King Avenue. Continue ahead along Greenwood Lake Turnpike for another 0.3 mile and turn left into the access road leading to the northern boat launch area for the Monksville Reservoir. The access road is just east of the Monksville Reservoir and directly opposite Beech Road. Continue along the access road for about 0.2 mile to the parking area.

At the south end of the parking area, you will notice a yellow gate with a triple white blaze, which marks the start of the Monks Trail. You will be following this trail for the entire hike. Proceed ahead for 50 feet, then turn left, following the white-blazed trail into the woods (the trail to the right, also blazed white, will be your return route).

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week

Iron Mines Loop #2 (Southwest) in Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks

Harriman State Park, Iron Mines Loop Trail. Photo by Daniel Chazin.
Harriman State Park, Iron Mines Loop, Black Rock Mountain. Photo by Daniel Chazin.
Harriman State Park, Iron Mines Loop, R-D Trail, Bald Rocks. Photo by Daniel Chazin.
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This loop hike climbs to viewpoints from the summit of Black Rock Mountain and passes the historic Hogencamp, Pine Swamp, Surebridge and Boston Mines.

6 hours
Moderate
9 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Historic: 
Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks
Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks
NY
Orange
119 Northern Harriman Bear Mountain Trails
06/19/2003
11/08/2015
Driving: 

Take N.Y. Route 17 north through Sloatsburg and Tuxedo. About 2.4 miles north of Tuxedo, take the exit leading to N.Y. Route 17A. Turn right at the top of the ramp onto County Route 106 and continue for 2.2 miles to a parking area on the right side of the road, just beyond a sharp curve.

From the parking area, cross the road and turn left on the White Bar Trail, blazed with white horizontal rectangles. The White Bar Trail parallels the road for about 500 feet, then turns right and crosses a stream on a metal culvert. A short distance beyond, it bears right at a fork (the road that goes off to the left will be your return route) and continues ahead on a woods road. 

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week
HOTW Date: 
Fri, 10/28/2016
HOTW Count: 
2

Iron Mines Short Loop

Hiker at Cape Horn on the Long Path - Iron Mines Short Loop - Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks - Photo: Daniel Chazin
NYNJTC maintained: 
1
Summary: 

This hike in Harriman State Park passes interesting remnants of old iron mines.

3 hours
Easy to Moderate
4 miles
Route type: 
Circuit
Allowed on leash
Historic feature
Views
Historic: 
Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks
Harriman-Bear Mountain State Parks
NY
Orange
119 Northern Harriman Bear Mountain Trails
05/07/2009
01/02/2015
Driving: 

Take N.J. Route 17 north to the New York State Thruway and take the first exit, Exit 15A (Sloatsburg). Turn left at the bottom of the ramp onto N.Y. Route 17 north, and continue through the Village of Sloatsburg. Just past the village, turn right at the traffic light, following the sign for Seven Lakes Drive/Harriman State Park. Follow Seven Lakes Drive for about 8 miles to the parking area for Lake Skannatati, on the left side of the road. The turnoff to the parking area is 0.7 mile beyond the Kanawauke Circle.

From the kiosk at the northwest corner of the parking lot, bear left and follow the aqua blazes of the Long Path along the north shore of the lake on a rocky footpath through a mountain laurel thicket. After about ten minutes, the trail bends away from the lake, crosses Pine Swamp Brook, and passes by a huge rock ledge to the right. A little over a mile from the start, you'll climb to a junction with the yellow-blazed Dunning Trail.

Reference/Source: 
Bergen Record: Hike of the Week